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Full text of "The Game breeder"

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LIBRARY 



OF THE 



Museum of Comparative Zoology 



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TH e 



QAH E DKEDEK 



APRIL, 1915 




THE" Object of this hagazine is 
TO Make- Noeth Ameeicathe 5i6gest 
Gahe Producing Countey in the Woeld 





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No. 1 



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PROFIT AND SATISFACTION 

lie in the number of poults you rear. Thousands die before they are two 
weeks old -the Ttikilt OlyndigeiStible and innutritions food. 

SPRATT'S GAME FOOD 

j AND 

PHEASANT MEALS 

will reduce the percentage of 
mortality to a minimum and 
will make Game Breeding a 
pleasure. 

SPRATT'S GHIG6RAIN 

contains no salvage grains, 
field corn, weed seeds, oyster 
shell or grit and is undoubtedly 
the best and cheapest food 
on the market. 

Birds fed on CHICGRAIN will 
have strength and stamina 
and will mature quickly. 

Below is a partial list of 

' ' ~~' Game Foods manufactured by 

SPRATT'S:— 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT POOD No. 3 (For Adult Birds). 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 12 (For Pheasant, Partridge and 
Quail Chicks). 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 5 (For Young Pheasants). 
SPRATT'S MAXCO (The most nourishing food obtainable). 
SPRATT'S PRAIRIE MEAT "CRISSEL" (Takes the place of Ants 

Eggs and is a perfect substitute for insect life). 
SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MEAL (The best food for Ducklings). 
SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MANNA (A strong nourishing food). 




MUS. COMP. ZOOL 
LIBRARY 



K.aeVARO 
UHIVERSITY 



Send 25 Cents for "PHEASANT CULTUREr 
"POULTRY CULTURE" sent on receipt of 10 Cents. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

Factory and Chief Offices at NEWARK, N. J. 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Here's The 

Steel 



Lining 

It grips the powdei 

charge and puts all the 

punch back of the shot - 

It gets the load to the 
target quicker — 



It protects gun and shooter — 







And It's Found Only In 

UMC 

SPEED SHELLS 

The Steel Lining is one of those simple but fundamental discoveries that come 
along now and again, and revolutionize standards all along the line. 

You know how it works out, in practice, at traps or in the field — the shot 
thrown faster, getting quicker to the marks ; a shorter lead on your bird ; an easier 
feeling about angles— less guess-work on the quartering bird or the "on-comer". 

Many a dealer sells nothing else in Shot shells— has no demand for anything 
else. Whatever make of gun a man shoots, whether a Remington-UMC or some 
other standard arm, he is more than hkely to shoot one or the other of these 
Remington-UMC Shells— the "Arrow" or the "Nitre Club". 

Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 

299 Broadway, New York City 



THE GAME BREEDER 



For 50 YEARS PARKER GUNS 
have led all other makes in dura- 
bility and efficiency 
among trap and field 
shooters. 




f^' ^ 



With a range of price 
from $27.50 to $525, 

it fits all purses. 

QUALITY is the dominant 
feature in all grades of the 
PARKER GUX. 




PARKER BROS., Meriden, Conn. 32VatrS 



Wire - Coops -Traps 

and other appliances for 

GAME FARMS and PRESERVES 



Strong heavy coops and fenders which ^^^ill 
not blow over. 

Wire, all sizes, for Deer, Pheasants, Ducks, Quail 
and other game. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 

THE GAME BREEDER 150 Nassau Street, New York 



THE GAME BREEDER 



THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands onequaled. 

Nem) Edition Just Oat. Illustrated. 
A t lain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the an of training, handling and the correcting 
of taults of the bird dosr subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 

Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, $1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Our Feathered Game 



A HANDBOOK OF 



American Game Birds 



BY DWIGHT^W. HUNTINGTON. 



Illustrations — Shooting Pictures 
in color and Portraits of all 
American Game Birds 



$2.00 




In Loaded Shells 

of practically all makes 
you can get Infallible. 
Ask for it the next time 
you buy shells. 

If you are interested in 
trapshooting write for our 
booklet called, "TRAP- 
SHOOTING." It is worth 
reading. Address 

HEtfpULES POWDBH^ CO. 
Wilmington, Del. 



ffEIipULES^POWDEPiCO. 



Heating and Coo 
Clubs and Cottages 

The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Camps ; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
large gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Raneres 
Victor Cook DobuleOven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. lo Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. go Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves 

Ormond Ranges 

No. IS Hot Blast Heating Stoves 

Victor Gem Cook 

Laundry Stoves 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 
Victor Cook Ranges 
Loyal Victor Ranges 
Victor Hotel Ranges 
Elm Ranges 
Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and | 

Cauldrons 



Manufactured by 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2i\d St., PHiladelpHia, Pa. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field— Charles Hallock, Portrait— The Machold Bill— Pheas- 
ant Breeding in Ohio — The Prices of Pheasants in New York— Game 
Breeding in Canada— The Sale of Trout and the Price of Tags— An 
Emblem of Fairness— His Honor, Mayor Viles— Gardner's Island— Our 
Vanishing Wild Hares — Game Tags Migratory Bird Law Unconsti- 
tutional — Our Vanishing Jacks. 

A Peculiar Fox Hunt at a Quail Club - - - H. J. Montanus 

A New Jersey Pheasantry, and Comment on New York Laws 

"Philadelphia Record" 

The Bob-White in Oregon Wm. L. Findley 

A Pheasant-Bantam Hybrid - - - - - H. J. W^heeler 

Pond Fish Culture ....... Prof. L. L. Dyche 

Yet to Be Landed. Poem - - - - Hon. M. D. Baldwin 

Game Enemies — Foxes and Partridges - - - - F. E. R. Fryer 

The Game Breeders' Department _ . _ . By Our Readers 

Pheasant Breeding, by Spencer Brothers — Breeding Pin Tails, Teal and 
other Fowl, by C. J. Harris — Hatching Pheasants, by Joseph J. Demenkow 
— Pheasant-Bantams, by W. N. Dirks 

Editorials— The Attitude of the Camp Fire Club— Wrong End First- 
Gratifying Requests — Quail on Toast — Increasing Prejudice — A W^arm 
Ration — Excitement 
Correspondence — Trade Notes, Etc. 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please enter my name as a contributing member of The Game 
Conservation Society and send me its publication, THE GAME 
BREEDER, for one year. $1.00 enclosed. 

Name 

Street 

City 

State 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



T^! Game Breeder 



VOLUME VII 



APRIL, J9I5 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER J 




Charles Hallock, 

We received recently the two pictures 
of Charles Hallock, reproduced in this 
issue ; one of them was made quite re- 
■cently. Sportsmen should remember 
that the success of the "more game" 
inovement which promises quickly to 
"make America the biggest game produc- 
ing country in the world, is largely due 
to the influence of Charles Hallock, the 
dean of American sportsmen. 



The Machold Bill. 

The bill permitting the sale in New 
York of game produced by breeders in 
other States upon the same terms that 
trout from other States are now sold in 
New York, was discussed March 9, be- 
fore the Assembly Committee at Albany. 
Since the announcement had been made 
that the hearing would be held on the 
10th a number who would have attended 
from other states did not come. 



The Editor of The Game Breeder 
pointed out the common sense features 
of the measure ; referred to the great 
industry of game breeding which had 
resulted in the production of hundreds 
of thousands of deer and game birds 
during the last few years and insisted 
that the breeders in other states should 
have the same right to sell their food in 
the New York market that the New 
York breeders have. The receipts from 
tags, he said, indicated that hundreds 
of thousands of dollars were sent abroad 
for cold storage game and that this 
money should go to American game 
farmers, and that it would result in 
"more game" being produced in the 
United States. 

Mr. Marshall McLean said he repre- 
sented the Camp Fire Club and that the 
club was opposed to the bill. Mr. Mack- 
ennen, chairman of the Fish and Game 
Commission, said it would be impossible 
to save the wild life of New York if the 
outside breeders were permitted to sell 
game. He evidently impressed the Com- 
mittee with the idea that it was high time 
New York had game officers capable of 
handling this business problem as it can 
be handled, properly. 

Draining in Iowa. 

At the conference on Game Breed- 
ing, held recently in New York, Hon. E. 
C. Hinshaw, the able Game Warden of 
Iowa, said the sportsmen and nature 
lovers of Iowa are constantly trying to 
prevent the farmers of the State from 
draining the last square foot of lake and 
swamp in order to place it under culti- 
vation. 

The remedy is to show the farmers 
that wild ducks can be profitably raised 
on such privately owned lakes and 
swamps. Wild ducks sell readily for $3 



r* 



THE GAME BREEDER 



♦ per pair in the markets and the sports- 
men should pay fair prices for the shoot- 
ing provided they can sell a lot of the 
ducks to secure the money for the shoot- 
ing rental. It seems idle to urge a 
farmer to pay taxes on such properties 
simply that he may entertain licensed 
trespassers. The duck shooting surely 
will be ended when the marshes are 
drained and it would be far better for 
the sportsmen to form many shooting 
clubs and preserve many of the marshes. 
Where thousands of ducks are reared 
many will fly away to the rivers and 
other public waters where the public can 
shoot. The Game Breeders' Association 
when it reared ducks on Long Island, 
N. Y., furnished at least a thousand 
ducks for the waters outside the preserve 
in one season. 

Pheasant Breeding in Ohio. 

It seems likely that Ohio will enact 
a game breeders' law permitting the 
breeding of pheasants for the market. 
The Sportsman's Review, quoting a Co- 
lumbus paper says : "The pheasant 
weighs about four pounds and would 
now bring in the open market $1.50 and 
the demand is unexhaustible according 
to General Speaks. It is a most prolific 
bird, the hen laying about forty eggs 
and the spring hatch is ready for the 
table by fall, thus bringing a quick re- 
turn. The flesh is light and very palat- 
able. The bird is sold in all the markets 
of Europe just as poultry is sold, and the 
demand there gives hundreds a living 
with comparatively little work." 

General Speaks, the Ohio Game War- 
den, predicts that within five years a 
large number of people in Ohio will be 
raising the birds for the market. 

The Prices of Pheasants in New York. 

"The Ohio people will be interested to 
learn that the pheasants bring $2.50 each 
in New York, when sold to dealers and 
hotels in large lots. The Astor Hotel 
purchased all the pheasants a big club 
wished to sell and one of our readers 
who has a farm in Dutchess County, sold 
three hundred birds last fall to a game 



dealer for $2.50 each. Most of the 
hotels and clubs could not get any phea- 
sants. There is a demand for hundreds 
of thousands in New York City.. 

Game Breeding in Canada. 

We predicted that Canada soon would 
feel the "more game" breeze which has 
been blowing with increasing velocity in 
the United States, and which assumed 
cylonic importance in Indiana, recently, 
when it ceased to be a criminal offence 
to rear any species of game for profit. 
The Free Press, London, Ontario, men- 
tions, among the entirely new sugges- 
tions made to the fish and game com- 
mittee of the legislature, "a provision 
for the sale of imported game or that 
raised in captivity; permits to take game 
for propagation purposes and to trans- 
port the same." 

We are told there is a possibility that 
after this year no wild ducks will be 
offered for sale in public markets of the 
province. 

The Sale of Trout and the Price of 
Tags. 

It is only a few years ago that the 
New York League of Sportsmen, in 
convention at Syracuse, was asked to en- 
dorse a proposed law favoring the sale 
of trout produced by industry. The 
editor of The Game Breeder was present 
and, of course, favored this common 
sense measure. 

Dr. Dutcher, the President of the 
Audubon Society, spoke in opposition to 
the measure and termed it "an entering 
wedge." If such a law should be en- 
acted he said, in another year these gen- 
tlemen will be here urging a measure to 
permit the sale of game. Our feathered 
friends will be in danger, etc., etc. He 
did not have to wait another year since 
on the following day the editor of The 
Game Breeder, who had been invited to 
address the convention, read a paper 
advocating the selling and the eating of 
the edible "feathered friends." when 
produced by industry. The sale of trout 
was soon permitted, and not long there- 
after the sale of certain food birds and 
deer was permitted provided they be 



THE GAME BREEDER 











^g^;^-a^^pc. 



produced abroad or within the State of 
New York. Mr. Chas. J. Vert, a mem- 
ber of the League, is entitled to the will be enacted, 
credit of haA-ing brought the trout mat- 
ter to the attention of the League. 

Trout Tags. 

The trout law permits the sale of 
trout from other states, in New York. 
At the legislative hearing at Albany, 
March 9, an amendment was discussed 
which provides that the tags shall no 
longer cost 3 cents each but that the 
Conservation Commission shall only 
charge the actual cost of the tags which 
would be a very small charge. 

Mr. Charles J- Vert, speaking for the 
amendment, said that the straight tax of 
3 cents for each tag made a tax of from 
12 to 24 cents per pound on every pound 
of this desirable food sold, the amount 
depending upon the size of the trout and 
the number to the pound. He argued 
forcibly that it was a public wrong to 
impose such a tax upon food and said 
that no other state except New York 
made such excessive charges. No one 
excepting the Conservation Commission, 
he said, opposed the measure and he 
was informed they wanted the money. 
The question evidently was of economic 



importance. It seems likely at this writ- 
ing that the amendment to the trout law 



An Emblem of Fairness. 

Often we have said we would print 
anything anyone may wish to say against 
our policy. Any one who thinks Ave are 
wrong in advocating "more game and 
fewer game laws," can say so in this 
magazine and give his reasons if he has 
any. This month we give prominence to 
the statement of Mr. Neubold L. Her- 
rick, 60 Wall Street, New York, who 
says we are wrong. He is not a sub- 
scriber to the magazine ; evidently he has 
not read it. He simply ran across one 
of our campaign circulars and wrote his 
opinion oi» it. So here it is. We are 
glad to give it space to illustrate our 
fairness. It is becoming more and more 
difficult to find any one who will say we 
are wrong. 

His Honor, Mayor Viles. 

Hon. Blaine S. Viles, of Augusta, Me., 
has been elected Mayor with a splendid 
majority, says Maine Woods. We con- 
gratulate his honor and take a special 
pleasure in so doing since Mr. Viles is 
a contributing member of The Game 



8 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Conservation Society and we are always 
glad to see our readers successful when 
they run for office. Mr. Viles is a mem- 
ber of the Fish and Game Commission 
of Maine. = 

Gardners Island. 

Mr. Clarence H. Mackay has leased 
the shooting on Gardner's Island which 
contains about 3,000 acres, said to be 
well stocked with pheasants, quail, wood- 
cock, etc. The island is a short distance 
to the eastward of Long Island, New 
York, and for many years it was leased 
to Mr. A. F. Schermerhorn who had ex- 
cellent shooting every season. 

Besides the abundant live game of the 
upland there are thousands of ducks. 
Some are bred on the island ; others visit 
it during the fall migration in big num- 
bers. Since Mr, Mackay is a practical 
game preserver the game will increase 
rapidly during his term and it is to be 
Tioped that he will send much game to 
the New York markets as he no doubt 
will, since he is well known as a gener- 
ous and public spirited man. He has an 
excellent quail shoot in the South where 
the quail always are plentiful. He em- 
ploys capable gamekeepers and has a 
splendid kennel of pointers and setters. 

Our Vanishing Wild Hares. 

One of our Connecticut readers sends 
us a newspaper clipping which says a 
bill "authorizing towns to offer a bounty 
of not more than $5.00 for killing wild 
Belgian and wild German hares.' Pos- 
sibly the word Belgian was inserted to 
avoid the appearance of any violation of 
neutrality notions. Truly game law 
making is a remarkable industry. Enough 
money is spent every year on game laws 
to feed the nation with game. The 
bounty hunters should pick up a few 
ruffed grouse while they last. 

Game Tags. 

The tags required for the game birds 
cost 5 cents each. This evidently is ex- 
cessive and in time these tags also will 
be furnished at actual cost which should 
be a small fraction of a cent per tag. 
The absurdity of permitting the sale of 
trout from other states; the sale of 



game from foreign countries; the Sale 
of game produced by industry within 
New York, and refusing the breeders of 
other states the right to sell the foods 
they produce in the best market has been 
emphasized by The Game Breeder and 
our readers can rest assured the subject 
will be not dropped until a common 
sense enactment is safely in the books. 
If it does not pass this year we believe 
it will next winter. Nonsense surely 
can not long prevail even if large sums 
are collected to support it. 

Migratory Bird Law Unconstitutional. 

A dispatch from Topeka, Kansas, to 
The Globe, N. Y., says: 

The migratory bird law was declared un- 
constitutional by Judge Pollock in the United 
States District Court to-day. Judge Pollock 
held congress had no jurisdiction over game 
in any states, and that separate states only 
had the right to enact laws for regulation or 
protection of game. The decision was in the 
case of George L. McCuUagh, a banker of 
Galena, Kan., and two companions arrested 
on complaint of the United States district 
attorney for shooting ducks out of season. 
The defendants filed a demurrer attacking the 
law, and Judge Pollock sustained their con- 
tentions. _ 

Surprising Game Law Activity. 

A New England game officer, of the 
right sort, says the legislature in his 
state is in full swing and one might im- 
agine from the bills and the discussions 
that legislators are more interested, some 
in the protection and some in the exter- 
mination of game, than they are in ed- 
ucation or agriculture. 



Our Vanishing "Jacks." 

Jack rabbits have become so abun- 
dant in eastern Oregon that they are a 
menace to farmers' crops. In Harney 
county a four-mill tax produced $31,000 
for a jack rabbit bounty fund. The 
bounty law became effective January 2, 
1915. On February 18, 1915, the county 
clerk's office had paid a bounty of 5 
cents each on 156,707 rabbits. 

The Oregon Sportsmen also informs 
us that Harney county paid $1,039 for 
1,039 bobcats, so that it woul4 appear 
that cats vanish nicely when a bounty 
is paid. 




THE GAME BREEDER 



9 




A PECULIAR FOX HUNT AT A QUAIL CLUB. 

By H. J. MONTANUS. 

Mr. Ashton's home was our first 
headquarters. The inclosed fihn, when 
printed, will give you a good picture of 
him. 

We secured two foxes and one of 
them was taken in a peculiar manner. 
Two members of our association, feeling 
somewhat tired, proceeded to a tree 
which had fallen, after having weathered 
many a storm, and broken short off 
about ten feet from the ground. There 
was a hole of about 6 inches in diameter 
in the side of the tree and at the small 
end there was an opening of 3 inches. 
Mr. Raush, looking in the hole, called 
Mr. Henry Lemaire's attention to a pe- 
culiar object, presumably a rabbit. Le- 
maire punched the object with a stick but 
there was no move ; finally with much 
courage he inserted his hand and dis- 
covered Mr. Fox dead in the hole. Upon 
the arrival of the gamekeeper and after 
some ten minues' work, Mr. Fox was 
removed from his trap. Evidently he 
had made an awful fight for his life, and 
in the endeavor to get out of the hole his 
sides were torn. 

The explanation offered was that Brer 
Fox had pursued a squirrel which had 
run into the hole for safety. The squir- 
rel easily came out the smaller hole but 
the fox became wedged in the narrow 
l)art of the hole and could neither go. 




We recently had a fox hunt, (prob- 
ably I should say fox shoot, since fox 
hunting usually refers to riding behind 
the hounds) to celebrate the 77th birth- 
day of the organizer of our association, 
Mr! Jas. M. Ashton, who is hale and 
hearty and likely to reach the century 
mark. Our association preserves and 
shoots quail in good numbers and the 
fox shooting is done to protect the 
feathered game. 



10 THE GAME BREEDER 

forward or backward. He had starved because we do not let foxes, hawks, dogs, 

to death. cats and many other kinds of vermin 

We secured two foxes, as you will ^^^ j^_ j^e Game Breeder has given 

see, and the hawks shown m the other , cnrrerf pHvire and we all ire 

. , /-^ • 1 J i 1 us tne currcct auvice diiu. we dii circ 
pictures. Our game is abundant because 

we look after it and feed it in winter and much interested in the magazine. 



A NEW JERSEY PHEASANTRY. 

With Some Comment on the Laws of the Empire State Which Require New 

Jersey Pheasants to Be Shipped to Liverpool and Back Before They 

Can Be Sold as Food in New York. 

[This is the twenty-second of a series of two hundred articles about American game farms 
and preserves. — Editor.] 

Unless the New York game laws of what he succeeded in trapping, a 
which make it imperative for a Haddon- naturalist. So it was quite consistent 
field pheasant to travel all the way to that, on his new quest, the idea of 
Liverpool and back across the broad At- adopting game of some kind and rear- 
lantic before it can appear for sale in ing it appealed to him. He always had 
the market of the Empire State are been interested in the pheasant, princi- 
changed, the Legislature at Albany will pally because of the difficulty of rear- 
find itself facing a serious situation, ing it • in captivity, so the gamey bird 
Already the Governor has been ap- was decided upon and the hobby hunt 
pealed to and his attention drawn to the ended, and the Reeves pheasant farm 
infringement by the game laws of his started. 

State of the rights guaranteed under From a few small pens it grew until 

the Federal Constitution, and he has it covers nearly a half-acre under wire, 

been requested to suggest to the Legis- with many buildings and coops to ac- 

lature that it do away with the double commodate the 80 or 90 birds kept on 

transatlantic voyage of the American- hand for breeding purposes. And dur- 

born game bird, thus shortening the trip ing all these years Reeves has refused 

of the New Jersey pheasant from some- to commercialize his hobby. He started 

thing like 6,000 miles to 60. with the idea of making his pheasant 

As the representative of the New farm a producing home from which the 

Jersey pheasant the initial step toward product would go to stock the wooded 

this important reform in the New York district of South Jersey, and hundreds 

laws was taken a few days ago by S. of birds have been liberated through 

V. Reeves, of No. 114 East Park ave- that section of the State by him in the 

nue, when he brought this violation of past quarter. 

the comity of States to the Governor's But even hobbies sometimes show a 

attention. Since then he has been busy disposition to become unmanageable, and 

with the campaign which, it is expected. Reeves found that, while it was easy to 

will result in relieving the New Jersey supply the wilds with birds, something 

bird from the danger of being confis- more was needed. One thing in partic- 

cated when on sale in a New York mar- ular attracted his attention, the market 

ket unless an official foreign passport, conditions and marketing restrictions, 

guaranteeing its legal right to be there This led him to investigating the game 

is found tucked under its wing. laws of other states and one of the 

Thirty years ago Reeves felt the need things he discovered was that New York 

of a hobby. When a boy he had been excluded the New Jersey pheasant while 

a famous trapper of small game and it admitted those shipped from European 

birds and had become, through his study ports, and, what was still more interest- 



^ 



THE GAME BREEDER 11 

ing, was that New Jersey birds were fully feathered the new bird shows 

shipped abroad and reshipped to New markings of exquisite beauty. It also 

York as European pheasants. is a strong bird and may become an- 

Ouite naturally he felt an injustice other permanent variety. The Prince of 
wal being done his little colony, the Wales is no mean aquatic bird. It 
colonies of other pheasant breeders and takes to the marshlands, and will swim 
the hundreds of pheasants putting in as easily as a duck. For this reason it 
their time acquiring a spicy European is well adapted for New Jersey propa- 
gameflavor in the wilds of his own state, gation and is being stocked in the low- 
Now the injustice is squarely before the lands and marshy regions, 
lawmakers of New York, and the ac- In the breeding of pheasants Reeves 
tion to be taken by them will be watched has some exciting experiences. A pheas- 
with interest. ant cock is one of the gamiest of game 

Contrary to general belief, the pheas- birds. He is well spurred, is quick, can 

ant is not one of the older English game rise and strike at a considerable height 

birds. While it has been known and fa- and prefers fighting to running. Hardly 

vored for table use for centuries, and a day passes but Reeves is made the ob- 

for other centuries worshiped as a ject of attack by one or more of them, 

sacred bird by the Chinese, it was not Contented so long as he remains outside 

until 1821 that it was introduced in the wired inclosure, his entrance is the 

England by a man named Reeves, un- signal for attack. A wicked dash at his 

related to the Haddonfield Reeves. The legs is instantly followed by one at his 

English pheasant, now known as the head, and it frequently happens that he 

Reeves pheasant, was brought by him ducks just in time to escape with the loss 

from China. A little later John R. of his hat. And all the while the pheas- 

Reeves. his son, returned from the Far ant keeps up a constant sputtering. If it 

East, bringing with him a consignment is not downright profanity it is a good 

of pheasant hens, and from this stock imitation of it. 

the common English pheasant sprang. . Unlike the game cock, the effect of 

PRODUCING NEW VARIETIES. domcstication fails to outbreed this dis- 

Strictly speaking, the bird is of Asi- position even after many generations 
atic origin, although subsequent cross have lived and died within the wire con- 
"breedings have produced a number of fines. Once a game pheasant, always a 
European varieties. At the Reeves game pheasant, appears to be the rule, 
pheasant farm here, the Ring Neck, In trying to tame them Reeves has found 
Reeves, Lady Amherst, Prince of Wales that, while the pheasant sometimes will 
and Golden varieties are being bred and appear to have lost his love of the wild, 
cross bred by Reeves, who has demon- the result is more apparent than real, 
strated the possibility of producing even Frequently he has been tempted to re- 
a better-flavored and stronger bird than lease a few of the tamer birds from the 
is represented by the older parent stock, inclosures. But the result always has 
For instance, his experiments have been that once outside the netting, they 
shown that the cross between the Prince grasp the opportunity and are ofif with a 
of Wales and the Ring Neck insures a whirr and, once freed, can rarely be re- 
faster, larger, gamier and better-flavored captured. 

bird, and many of them are being bred In the rearing of the newly-hatched 

by him. As this crossing reproduces its pheasant it has been found that is best 

kind, it is believed a new variety of attended to by bantam hens, and so the 

pheasant has been added to the list, and Reeves pheasant farm has a corps of 

one that will become a favorite with these diminutive little fowls on hand, 

sportsmen as well as with epicures. For some reason the pheasant hen has 

One of the most beautiful results so little conception of maternal duties and 

far obtained resulted from mating Lady less inclination to practice them. Possi- 

Amherst and Golden Pheasants. When blv she believes in the law of the sur- 



12 THE GAME BREEDER 

vival of the fittest, and so reconciles her- the Httle pheasant quite satisfactorily, 

self to the loss of her brood when the with the assistance of this little mother 

latter scatters almost as soon as hatched. -^ ^^^ ^^^^ f^^^^ ^ggi^le to raise fully 

Rarely will any be left to her after the ,^„ . , t • i i i j 

third or fourth day. But the bantam ^0 per cent, of the young birds hatched 

hen works along other lines, and, if the at the Reeves farm.— Philadelphia Rec~ 

coop be not too large, manages to mother ord. 



THE BOBWHITE IN OREGON. 

By WlLLIAAI L. FiNLEY. 

[We were about to ask Mr. William L. Finley to write an article on the status of the 

bobwhite in Oregon when he sent us the Oregon Sportsman containing the follow- 
ing story about the introduction of this quail in his state. The article on, "The Intro- 
duction of Bobwhite in Montana," written by Hon. M. D. Baldwin for The Game Breeder, 
attracted much attention and Mr. Finley's article is equally timely and interesting. — Editor.] 

In our Oregon country. Bob-white is of the State Hospital near Pendleton, 

loved by all. Since his coming years They thrive well in the patches of wil- 

ago, there has never been an open sea- low and cottonwood along >the river, 
son in this state. No bird gladdens the Years ago. Bob-white quail were in- 

heart of the Oregon farmer more than troduced into the Boise valley in Idaho 

Bob-white as he calls from the top of and from this point they have undoubt- 

an old rail fence, for the larger part of edly spread to eastern Oregon in the 

our farmers knew him in bare-foot days vicinity of Vale and Ontario in Mal- 

among the hills of the easten'i states. He heur county and along the Snake river 

is the friend and companion about the in Wallowa county. 

garden and field. His call means glad- Bob-white are also found in the north- 

ness and satisfaction. To some of my ern part of Umatilla county and it may 

farmer friends, he is always an optimist, be these birds spread north from those 

If a shower is needed, one may hear that were introduced at Pendleton in 

Bob-white calling — "More-wet! More- 1893; or they may possibly have- been 

wet!" After a dreary downpour, that introduced by some one in that locality, 
has lasted for several days. Bob-white During the summer of 1899 while on 

is sure to mount an old brush heap and a cruise up the Willamette river with 

sing just as confidently — "No-more-wet! Herman T. Bohlman, we saw and heard 

No-more-wet !" Bob- white quail near Independence. 

The history of the introduction of the They were not uncommon at that time 

Bob-white quail into Oregon would be in the country around Salem and south 

very interesting if it were complete. A to Independence. 

few birds > were brought in from the During. the spring of 1908, I heard a 

East thirty or thirty-five years ago and Bob-white quail at Risley station be- 

liberated in the Willamette valley. tween Portland and Oregon City. Dur- 

Mr. J. H. Raley of Pendleton, writes ing the early spring of 1909, I fre- 

that during the fall of 1893 he secured quently heard Bob-white quail calling i'"' 

sixty Bob-white quail from the Willam- the vicinity of Jennings Lodge. I am 

ette valley and liberated them on Mc- very sure a pair nested in that locality. 

Kay creek on the place where he was but after the summer was over I, sa-w 

then living. This accounts for the cov- nothing more of these birds, nor were 

eys of Bob-white quail along the Uma- they there during the following -year, 

tilla river west of Pendleton. During They were likely killed by house cats, 
the summer of 1911, I heard several In September of 1912, I saw three 

Bob-white quail calling on the grounds different flocks of Bob-white quail with- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



13 



in a distance of a mile or so of. Sher- 
wood in the southeastern part of Wash- 
ington county. 

Mr. C. C. Bryan, Deputy Game War- 
den of Corvalhs, reports that on May 
20. 1912, he heard numbers of Bob- 
white quail calling about three miles 
west of Lebanon. He reports that dur- 
ing 1911, he saw but very few of these 
quail in the southern part of Benton 
county, but in 1912, the birds had ma- 
terially increased in that locality. 

During the fall of 1911, Mr. George 
Russell, Deputy Game Warden at Gas- 
ton, reports seeing a number of coveys 
of Bob-white quail in Polk, Benton and 
Linn counties. 

Bob-white quail are now fairly com- 
mon in the Willamette valley from the 
foothills of the Cascades west to the 
foothills of the Coast range, and from 
Oregon City south to Albany, and es- 
pecially in the vicinity of Corvallis and 
north to Dallas, McMinnville and For- 



est Grove. At the present time, they 
are perhaps more abundant in parts of 
Benton, Polk, Yamhill and Marion 
counties than in any other parts of the 
state. During the winters of 1913 and 
1914, about 200 of these birds were 
trapped in Yamhill county, near Mc- 
Minnville, and liberated in other parts 
of the state. During the winters of 1914 
and 1915, over 300 were trapped near 
the same localities to stock other sec- 
tions. 

During 1913, a covey of Bob-white 
quail was reported near Grants Pass, 
but at that time, as far as I know, there 
were practically none of these birds to 
the south, especially through the Rogue 
river valley and across the Cascade 
range into Klamath, Crook, Lake and 
Harney counties. Since then Bob-white 
quail havie been liberated in Douglas, 
Jacksoii, Josephine, Coos, Multnomah 
and Klamath counties. 



A PHEASANT-BANTAM HYBRID. 

H. J. Wheeler, Kingston, R. L 

Although there have been reported, ish cast lipon the top of the head. The 

from time to time, several instances of short feathers of the face patch were 

a successful cross between the pheasant turkey-red. The measurements of the 

and the domestic fowl, none of these different parts of the body were as fol- 

has thus far withstood the results of lows : 

close investigation. The following is a Millimeters. 

brief description of the results of an ^,?"i? °/ "P^f '; i™^"!'*"'^ S 

■ , J^ 1 1 t-v T T Width of tnandible at base ^U 

actual cross secured by Dr. Leon J . g^j. ^^f ^g 15 

Cole at the Rhode Island Agricultural Length of wing 250 

Experiment Station in the spring of Length of tail 540 

J9Qg Length of tarsus 70 

Of 77 eggs of the bantam fowl laid ^w^e?gh°f Z^pounds.^'To ounces.' '' ' 

between March 23, 1908, and August The color of the eye was bright bay. 

27 , 1909, only one was fertile. This t.gg description of the mother. 

was laid March 30, 1908. It was set The mother of the hybrid was a 

under a hen on April 4, and hatched mongrel bantam. The general color was 

April 28, thus giving an incubation buff with faint black stripes on the neck, 

period of 24 days. A large amount of black appeared in the 

description of the father. primary wing feathers and in the inner 

This bird, a Ring-Neck pheasant, was veins of the secondaries. The tail 

of average size, plumage, and vigor. feathers were largely black, but con- 

The feathers of the head and neck were tained some yellow. The comb was low, 

irridescent and purplish, with a green- but had the rose-comb characteristics, 



14 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and possessed a prominent spike. The 
wattles and ear-lobes were very well de- 
veloped. The measurements of different 
parts of the body were as follows : 

Millimeters. 

Length of upper mandible 18 

Width of mandible at base 13 

Length of tarsus 58 

Length of middle toe 54 

Weight, 1 pound, 14 ounces. 

The color of the eye was a faded yellow. 

DESCRIPTION OF TPIE HYBRID. 

The color of the head and neck was 
dark because of the presence of much 
black in the feathers. The yellow, how- 
ever, showed through to a considerable 
extent, especially on the top of the head, 
on the forehead, and on the upper 
throat region. The space immediately 
surrounding the eye was red. A slightly 
purplish irridescence appeared on the 
feathers of the lower neck. The gen- 
eral color of the body and back was a 
mixture of light yellow, darker yellow, 
chestnut, and also black, in very irregu- 
lar patterns. In many instances the 
black formed a double stripe on the 
feathers, while the chestnut was usually 
present on the edge of the feather and 
formed a band. The feathers of the 
rump and the tail coverts had many 
small black specks. The flights were a 
mixture of black and light yellow. The 
primaries were darker at the distal end. 
The tail feathers had an appearance 
more like the primaries. The comb was 
very low, having somewhat the appear- 
ance of a rose comb, but without the 
spike. The wattles and ear-lobes were 
absent. The eye had a yellowish tinge 
between faded yellow and a bay color. 
The measurements of various parts of 
the body were as follows : 

Millimeters. 

Length of upper mandible 26 

Width of mandible at base 18 

Length of the wing 224 

Longest tail feather 213 

Length of tarsus 70 

Length of middle toe 65 

Weight, 3 pounds, 3 ounces. 

For the first few weeks of its life, this 
hybrid more nearly approached pheasant 
chicks (Ring- Necks) in both color and 
call. When the feathers began to come. 



however, the bird lost some of its re- 
semblance to pheasant youngsters and 
also ceased its call except when fright- 
ened. The bird was kept carefully cooped 
to avoid its destruction by vermin. In 
spite of being fed and watered three or 
four times daily, it grew and remained 
very wild; two ducklings were put into 
the coop, but they seemed to exert no 
taming effect. After several months, it 
was transferred to a turkey yard in 
which were its parents, pigeons, and 
turkeys. Very soon, the hybrid became 
much more domesticated. As an adult, 
nothing has been observed in its be- 
havior to indicate sex; its call (only 
when frightened) is of a higher note 
than the cock pheasant's and is some- 
what like that of a cornered rat. 

COMPARISON OF THE PHEASANT, BANTAM 
AND HYBRID. 

The general shape of the head of the 
hybrid was much more like that of the 
pheasant. It lacked, however, the vel- 
vety feathers on the face, and did not 
have the extension into the ear-lobes, 
which was prominent on the pheasant. 
The bill of the hybrid was shaped some- 
what like that of the pheasant, but was 
rather lighter in color. It was also more 
grayish in appearance than that of the 
bantam. The general color of the body 
plumage resembled more closely that of 
the pheasant, except that the markings 
of the hybrid were not so regular, and 
more of the light yellow of the mother 
was apparent. The shape of the wing 
resembled more closely that of the ban- 
tam, but it was considerably longer. It 
did not, moreover, show the peculiar 
color and definite bars characteristic of 
the tail of the pheasant. The longest 
feathers of the tail were broad and 
rounded at the tip. They were much 
less long and tapering than those of the 
pheasant. They were carried, more- 
over, in a more erect position, showing 
no tendency to trail as did those of the 
father. The reason for this obviously 
lies in the anatomical structure of the 
tail-bearing portion, which resembles 
more closely that of the bantam. While 
in the pheasant the legs and feet were 
quite dark, and in the bantam a faded 



THE GAME BREEDER 



15 



yellow color, in the hybrid the color was 
between these two. Furthermore, while 
the pheasant had well developed spurs, 
about 10 mm. in length, and the bantam 
very short spurs on both feet, the hy- 
brid had on the right foot a short blunt 
spur and on the left only a low wart-like 



structure. When the hybrid was com- 
pared with the pheasant hen, it was ob- 
vious that the color-resemblance to the 
female pheasant was more striking than 
to the male bird, but that the form-re- 
semblance to the female was less 
marked. 



POND FISH CULTURE. 

By Professor L. L. Dycke, 

Late State Fish and Game Warden of Kansas. 

[This is the conclusion of an article begun in the November number prior to the un- 
timely death of Professor Dyche. — Editor.] 



The spawning bed or the nest that 
the Black Bass prepares here at the 
State Fish Hatchery is usually built on 
the north, east or west shores of the 
ponds, where the sun naturally warms 
the waters first in the early springtime. 
At this season of the year one does not 
have to walk far until more or less bass 
are seen swimming near the shore. One 
or two bass may be observed hovering 
over a certain spot. If it is a single fish 
it is usually a male, and if one will take 
the trouble to sit or lie down on the 
bank and keep perfectly still, in a not 
too prominent place, in from fifteen to 
twenty minutes the bass will usually be- 
come accustomed to the situation and 
will proceed with the ordinary work of 
nest-building that was being carried on, 
just the same as if there was no observer 
watching. 

We found that a few bushes stuck in 
the bank for sort of a blind and left 
there, so that the fish would get used to 
them, made the approach to the nest 
much easier for future visits. H the 
bass should happen to be a male prepar- 
ing a spawning bed or nest, a number of 
things can be learned by watching con- 
cerning the habits of the fish. The place 
selected for the nest depends upon the 
nature of the shore of the pond. A 
good many observations made by differ- 
ent persons have been recorded concern- 
in the spawning habits of the Black 
B^ss. This may account for many dis- 



crepencies, as the two varieties differ 
more or less in their habits. Many ob- 
servers record the fact that the nest is 
built in places where gravel and coarse 
sand are present and that the eggs are 
placed on the gravel beds. Some fish 
culturists prepare special gravel beds for 
fish to spawn on. Sometimes the gravel 
is placed in shallow boxes about two 
feet square, and sometimes the gravel 
and coarse sand mixtures are embedded 
in cement-formed nests and placed 
where the fish can find them. Such de- 
vices have been reported more or less 
successful with the Small-mouthed 
Black Bass. 

Here at the Kansas State Fish Hatch- 
ery the Large-mouthed Black Bass do 
not seem to pay much, if any, attention 
to gravel beds. The male fish usually 
starts the nest by selecting a place where 
the water varies from ten inches to two 
feet in depth. The places selected, so 
far as our observations have gone, are 
usually spots where more or less vegeta- 
tion in the shape of small water plants 
may be found growing. The fish usually 
removes most of this vegetable matter, 
and then fans the; spot with its fins and 
tail at intervals for a period of two, 
three or more days. The excavation 
which forms the nest or spawning bed 
varies from two to five or six inches in 
depth, and is from twenty to thirty-six 
inches across, or about twice the length 
of the fish. However, where the ground 



16 



THE GAME BREEDER 



is hard the nest is fiequently a shallow 
basin that does not much exceed the 
length of the fish. 

After the male has the nest completed 
he begins to search for a mate. In case 
he finds one before the nest is com- 
pleted the female usually helps with the 
work of completing the home. We have 
seen both fish working on the nest be- 
fore the spawning was commenced. A 
completed nest is one ready to receive 
the eggs. Such a nest has all the soft 
mud and debris removed. This the fish 
accomplished chiefly by the use of its 
fins, especially the tail fin, though the 
fish is not averse to grabbing certain 
kinds of material that is in the way in 
its mouth and removing it. The nest 
as completed in the ponds here at the 
Hatchery is usually fairly well lined with 
the roots and stems of water plants that 
naturally grow in such places. In some 
nests there is a sufficient amount of 
growing roots and stems of these plants 
to completely cover the bottom of the 
structure. Examination showed that 
nearly all of these roots and stems were 
attached to the earth and were green, 
and are not loose pieces of stuff resting 
on the bottom of the nest. 

The male fish drives away all intrud- 
ers, including other fish, whether large 
or small, dashing ferociously at any ani- 
mal, friend or foe, that may come in that 
particular locality. Even though com- 
pleted, the male fish spends much time 
over the nest fanning it with its fins, 
apparently to keep the nest bed fresh and 
clean, until a mate has been chosen and 
the spawning and hatching season is 
over. 

After the nest has been finished, as 
above described, by the male fish, he 
retires at short intervals, making many 
near about excursions apparently in 
search of a mate, and within a day or 
two, if you take the trouble to visit and 
watch the place at various times, you 
will see two fish swimming about the 
nest. During these excursions it is nec- 
essary for the builder of the nest to 
leave it for short intervals. At such 
times other fish seem to take fiendish 
delight in swimming over, around and 



about the nest. However, when the 
owner returns he immediately gives, hot 
chase to all such intruders and meddlers. 
We have seen two fish which we took 
for males, chasing each other and ap- 
parently contending for the ownership 
of a nest. 

The male, which is usually the smaller 
fish of a pair, continues his search as 
stated above for a partner until he finds 
a female that is willing to visit his newly- 
made quarters and examine the home 
and nest that he has prepared. If she 
likes the situation and is pleased with 
the homestead she remains at the nest, 
and usually works upon it a while her- 
self, putting on certain finishing touches. 
Now the male becomes very active and 
jealous ; he swims here and there and 
continually guards the female; he takes 
on the courage and ferocity of a warrior 
and dashes at any other fish that may 
come near ; he heads off with great dex- 
terity any move that would indicate that 
the female wanted to leave the premises. 
If the female is satisfied, or as soon as 
she becomes satisfied, the pair will swim 
around and around over the nest and in 
its immediate neighborhood, frequently 
moving side by side. In one instance 
observed this summer the male fish 
seemed to butt up against the side of 
the female with his head and shoulder, 
and would throw the female on her s^ide. 
The two fish would frequently strike the 
sides of their bodies together, and 
whirl and turn in different directions, 
making various grotesque maneuvers. 

After a courtship of this kind, which 
may last for one or more days, the fe- 
male begins to deposit her eggs in the 
nest. At this time the male is very ac- 
tive, swimming around the female and 
half knocking her over with his head 
and shoulder, and when the eggs are de- 
posited he ejects his milt in the water 
immediately over or above them. In 
this manner, without any act of copula- 
tion, the eggs are fertilized. While this 
spawning business is going on. the fish 
are usually in from one to three feet of 
water and in quick motion. We have 
watched them until we were dizz)'' try- 
ing to see and figure out just \yhat took 



THE GAME BREEDER 17 

place. It is a difficult matter under the pends largely upon the temperature of 
above circumstances to make exact ob- the water. Three years ago we marked 
servations. a nest where fish were spawning and 

The eggs, at least in some instances, visited it regularly every day. It was 
are deposited in elongated bunches or in early springtime, and was one of the 
strings by the female, but soon spread first nests we observed. The water was 
and adhere to the particles of vegetation * cold and it took fifteen days for the 
•in the nest. Other observers note that eggs to hatch and only a small per cent, 
the eggs adhere to the gravel in the nest. (we should judge about 10 per cent.) 
This would be true in gravel and pebble of them hatched. Many of the eggs, 
nests, and where there is no vegetable for one reason or another, disappeared, 
matter to form a lining for the nest bed, The eggs that were lost from this and 
and is especially true with the small- some other nests that we were watching 
mouthed Black Bass, as reported by disappeared apparently during the night 
various breeders of this species. time. We were not able to discover the 

We have not been able to figure out cause of their disappearance. Some of 
just how long this spawning process the eggs turned white, due to fungus 
lasts. We think, however, from obser- growths. Another nest that we marked 
vation made at the Hatchery, that at loiter in the season came off, so to speak, 
least in some cases it does not last very "i twelve days ; and another still later in 

long — only a few minutes. We are not the season hatched in seven days, 

certain, however, about the number of We found one this spring, which, 

times the operation may be repeated, if ''"'o mistake was made in the day 

Such observations are hard to get when when the eggs were deposited, hatched 

fish are active and in from one to two i" ^'^^ days. This was in the latter 

feet of water. We have observed cer- P^-^t of May, when the water was warm 

tain spawning on a few occasions, and ^"^ ^11 conditions most favorable, 
when we would examine the place a few- 
hours afterwards the spawning would -^ 
seem to have ceased. After the spawn- Yet To Be Landed. 
mg has finished, the male usually takes ,, ^. t^ t. 
charge of the nest and attempts to drive ^°^- ^- ^- ^^aldwin, 

the female away. After a day or so, if Member of the Montana Fish and 
you will take the trouble to watch the Game Commission, 

nest, you will find that the female, which The grandsire sat in his easy chair, 

IS usually the larger fish, has disap- And his laugh was a gurgling c'roak, 

peared ; or she may be seen swimming While the grandson told of a monstrous 
around several feet from the nest. trout 

The male fish guards the nest and He had hooked on a line— which broke, 

eggs during the greater part of the Then the old man gravely smiled and 
period of incubation, so to speak, and is said, 

"°iT ^Z^^ pugnacious than ever. He My dear boy, it was large I know, 

will hght anything that comes in his For I hooked that same old fish myself, 

dooryard, and is very active and very Some fifty years ago. 
busy flying around from place to place. 

When he is not annoyed by intruders * 

he spends much of his time over the nest, Members of the Game Conservation 

his hns continually moving, in order that Society are requested to purchase from 

tresh currents of water may continue to those who advertise. 

How over the eggs and prevent any 

sediment from settling upon them. This ^ 

great vigilance and activity on the part The Game Conservation Society is now 

ot the. male fish is kept up until the eggs the largest association of game breeders 
natch. Ihe period of incubation de- in the world. 



18 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Foxes and Partridges. 

F. E. R. Fryer (In Shooting). 

The harm done by foxes to partridges 
occurs mostly in the nesting season, and 
in a great measure is done by some old 
vixen in search of food for her cubs. 
When once they take to hunting for this 
class of food (the partridge on its nest) 
it is bad indeed for the partridge. The 
hunting man will tell you that as long 
as there are rabbits and rats about foxes 
will never take partridges, but by one 
who has visited the earths where there 
are cubs, and has seen the proportion 
of wings and feathers to fur and ani- 
mals legs lying about, such an opinion 
cannot be entertained. Again, in many 
cases rabbits are killed down in these 
days, and the case becomes still harder 
on the partridge. The worst time for 
them is when the cubs are able to feed 
themselves, and it stands to reason that 
a vixen who has to find food for her 
family does so in the easiest way pos- 
sible: and what more simple than to go 
up the windward side of a fence and 
catch each whiff of a gamey nature and 
stop and locate the unfortunate bird on 
its nest? Then comes a pounce, which 
very seldom misses its mark, and bang 
goes a covey of partridges. I have 
known of a bird escaping with the loss 
of many feathers, but still coming back 
and hatching ofif; but this is only an 
isolated case. 

How to prevent the 'destruction of 
birds and eggs by foxes is a most diffi- 



cult problem, Mr. Fryer says : 'T do 
not think any one will ever solve it." 

He advises that there must be a keeper 
whose duty is only to look after par- 
tridges and nothing else. 

There are only two ways in which he 
can help save the nests. One is to pre- 
vent the fox getting at the nest when he 
has winded it and the other is to pre- 
vent his winding it. 

Wire netting placed about the nests, 
will protect them and a fox can be pre- 
vented from winding a bird on its nest: 
by putting on the wind a stronger scent: 
than the bird produces. Various "smell- 
ing mixtures" are used. "Animal Oil,"" 
Mr. Fryer says, "is the most efficacious, 
but one must be careful to get it as 
strong as it can possibly be made. 

A preparation named "Renardine" is- 
largely advertised and sold. There are 
many testimonials from preserve own- 
ers and gamekeepers as to its eilfective- 
ness. One of the advertisements repre- 
sents a mule backing off a bridge where 
a little "Renardine" had been «pilled. 



BETTERMENT. 

With the present number The Game 
Breeder begins a new year. Our read- 
ers will be pleased to notice the new 
cover from a clever design by the tal- 
ented artist, Mr. C. B. Davis, who will 
contribute much to make the magazine 
interesting and attractive during the 
coming year. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



19 




THE GAME BREEDERS' DEPARTMENT. 

By Our Readers. 



Pheasant Breeding. 

By Spencer Brothers. 

The chief thing we try to do is to 
get good results with as little expendi- 
ture as possible. If one were to follow 
all the rules and ideas laid down in the 
books, good as they are, it would involve 
a heavy outlay. 

Our pheasants generally start laying 
about the first week in April, and by 
feeding plenty of green food, meat 
scraps, etc., they average 70 eggs or 
more per hen. We set the eggs on the 
ground, with a little straw for the nest, 
and draw up a small wire run to the box 
and allow the setting hen just enough 
room for a dusting place and green 
grass. We try to arrange to set as man\i 
hens as possible on the same day, using 
any breed of healthy hen we can get, al- 
though we do not care for the Barred 
Rock as a rule because they seem to ob- 
ject so much to being changed and set 
on the ground. 

Lately we have been raising game 
chickens for this purpose, also for sport 
and profit. They make the best of 
mothers and are a fine table fowl. We 
keep an incubator going constantly dur- 
ing the season at about 103°, and find it 
very useful for saving wet chicks or 
chilled eggs. We do not disturb the hen 
at all when hatching, but keep the box 
blocked up and dark until chicks are 
strong and dry. In about 24 hours the 
hens and birds are moved to some field 



and we try to keep small colonies of birds 
of the same egg in various suitable locali- 
ties where there seems to be plenty of in- 
sect life and cover. We keep the hens 
confined for about a week, but let the lit- 
tle pheasants run about, after that she is 
let out to roam at will, with nothing to 
return to at night but an open box, as 
the wire runs are needed quite often for 
the next batch of setting hens. The 
pheasants are fed for the first two weeks 
three times a day on nothing but hard 
boiled eggs, as they like it above all 
things, it is easy to prepare, and to regu- 
late the exact amount of food required. 
We find that it takes about two eggs at 
a meal to satisfy 17 birds up to two 
weeks old. After this age we cut down 
on the eggs somewhat, and also give corn 
meal, rolled oats and boiled rice (dry 
and not messy). 

When the birds are at an average age 
of six weeks, the hen is generally ready 
to leave them or they are getting too 
independent of her, so they are caught 
up and put in runs 50 feet by 200 feet, 
which gives them plenty of space to fiy 
and develop. The runs are covered by 
cord netting, so that they do not injure 
themselves. We now cut out the egg 
entirely, substituting meat scraps, plenty 
of green food, wheat and meal and 
boiled rice, which is substantially what 
we feed our old birds. 

We have found that the Mongolian 
Ringneck cross is an easier bird to raise 
than the pure Ringneck, as they are 



20 



THE GAME BREEDER 



hardier, grow and develop quicker, and 
the adult male bird averages about half 
a pound more in weight, and of course 
they are perfectly fertile hybrids. 

Our worst enemies are dogs, cats, 
'possums, etc., which do a great deal of 
' damage sometimes and keep us busy. To 
give an instance of the way the o'possum 
multiplies, we once captured an old fe- 
male and kept her in a pen where she 
gave birth to 13 and raised them all. 
When they got to be of goodly propor- 
tions, we chopped them up and fed them 
to the pheasants. Another occasional 
loss is when you find that a setting hen 
has killed all the little pheasants as soon 
as they hatch. This is more than you 
asked her to do and causes a slight 
strain on the temper. With best 
wishes for The Game Breeder. 

Breeding Pin Tails, Teal and Other 
Fowl. 

One of our Illinois readers, Mr. C. 
H. Harris, in answer to our inquiry 
about the breeding of pintailed ducks 
writes: "In regard to raising pintail 
or sprigtail ducks, I have had them for 
three or four years and never had one 
, to lay an egg. A Mr. Walter Evans 
tells me he has one once in a while to 
lay. The same may be said of teal. I 
have a few black or dusky mallards and 
have had them four years but I have 
never seen an egg from them. Tiger 
Brant and Snow geese have never bred 
for me. They will mate and the goose 
will get big behind like she was going 
to lay. A Brant gander will mate with 
a tame goose and their eggs will hatch. 
Wild geese breed well but they will have 
to be three years old before they will 
breed. Egyptian geese the same. I 
have had very good success with them 
but find they are terrible fighters. One 
gander killed a sprig and two green- 
heads the other day. I have to keep 
them in pairs during the breeding sea- 
son. If one of their young gets away 
for a day or so they will kill it when it 
gets with them again. They lay from 
6 to 8 eggs." 



Since variety in shooting as well as 
on the table is pleasing, it is to be hoped 
that the breeders will succeed in breed- 
ing sprigtails, teal and other water 
fowl. The fact that the green-head of 
the barnyards is a common duck, des- 
cended evidently from the mallard, 
would seem to indicate that our ancestors 
found this the easiest duck to domesti- 
cate. One mistake some breeders make 
in beginning their experiments is, they 
do not give their ducks enough conceal- 
ment. The wild duck requires cover just 
as the quail and grouse do. The black 
ducks, teal and pintails have been known 
to nest and hatch their young in captiv- 
:iy about secluded marshes and ponds , 
where the ducks could conceal their 
nests. Eggs taken from ducks nesting 
in such places can undoubtedly be hatched 
under hens and the young ducks should 
be comparatively tame and it would 
seem that their descendants should be as 
easily handled as mallards now are. One 
of our Long Island readers had no trou- 
ble with the black ducks. 

It is true in England also, that com- 
paratively few teal and other ducks be- 
sides the mallards are hand-reared. It 
is to be hoped that our readers will get 
busy and see what they can do with the 
species which thus far have not been 
reared abundantly. There is a rare 
chance for experimental work in Louis- 
iana and Florida, as well as in the Da- 
kotas, and in fact everywhere, since the 
teal and Florida dusky ducks and some 
others nest in a wild state in the South 
and many ducks should be reared from 
New England to Oregon and Washing- 
ton, when we have the secret of how to 
handle them. 

We hope this subject will be discussed 
by our readers and that we shall have 
some interesting reports during the year 
of successful experiments. 

Most gamekeepers advise starting with 
eggs and hand-rearing the young birds 
We have had very tame black ducks pro- 
duced in this way and they nested in 
the grass beside a pond and furnished a 
lot of eggs which were lifted and 
hatched under hens. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



21 



Hatching Pheasants. 

By Joseph J. Demenkow. 

In past four seasons I have tried 
many different methods in hatching out 
pheasants. I used common hens in the 
work, incubators and hens and incuba- 
tors combined with entirely distinct re- 
sults in each case. The best possible 
result obtainable comes by first method, 
with a live hen, especially when setting 
hen is a light weighing hen and kept per- 
fectly contented and free from lice be- 
fore and after hatching. 

A Bantam is the ideal foster mother 
in raising pheasants. A bantam will 
comfortably cover from 7 to 9 pheasant 
eggs at the start of the season and from 
9 to 11 eggs during warm months of 
June and July, and take care of the little 
ones at all times without any danger of 
smothering or maiming them. 

The second method, by the incubator, 
proved a total failure with me. In the 
first place. I never could get with an in- 
cubator one-half as many chicks from a 
given number of eggs as by the setting 
hen, and "the worst is yet to come" in 
trying to raise them. It is not easy to 
find a hen charitable enough or stupid 
enough to accept a machine hatched 
brood, and to try and raise them under 
a brooder without the help of a hen is 
a hopeless task. In a short time young 
pheasants get used to a hen's talk very 
readily, but somehow they refuse to heed 
human language and every motion made 
in feeding and watering scares them 
away to all corners of their run ; sickness 
and mortality soon follow and usually 
result in wiping out the whole flock. 

I had fairly good results by using hen 
and an incubator combined. I resorted 
to this last method on account of the 
over heavy setting hens I had to put up 
with. When setting hens are too heavy 
they quite often smash a number of 
eggs during the period of setting and 
with their heavy body they smother 
young pheasants to death at the time of 
hatching. To avoid this loss I allow 
the hen to sit over the eggs for 22 or 
23 days, then I take the eggs away from 



her and put them into the machine to 
hatch. Of course I do leave one or two 
eggs under the hen to hatch and thus 
give her a chance to get acquainted with 
baby pheasants. When the hatching is 
over I take those that hatched out in a 
machine and put them all under the hen. 
I prefer to do this in the evening and the 
next morning I commence feeding the 
young. 

Mass'achusetts. 



Pheasant-Bantams. 

Herewith is a copy of our record 
covering work with Pheasant-Bantams. 

A one-year-old ringneck cock was 
penned up with a white cochin bantam 
hen, having fertilized two out of five 
eggs, twelve more hens (all virgin* pul- 
lets) were ^.lotted to him. From the 
look of the record he seems to have 
served the first hen only. 

The birds from No. 1, 2 and 3 hatch 
were all black; No. 4, 1 black and 1 
about the color of a light ringneck ; No. 
5, 4 were of the latter color and 1 black. 

As the picture will show, we still have 
six of these birds, three black and three 
light colored. [Picture was published 
last month. — Editor.] 



Apr. 


24 


5 


2 


1 


May 16- 


-22 days 


May 


9 


32 


1 


1 


May 31- 


-22 days 


May 


18 


42 


1 


1 


June 12- 


-25 days 


June 


1 


66 


3 


2 


June 25- 


-24 days 


June 


15 


40 


7 


5 


July 7- 


-22 days 


June 


30 


17 












July 


8 


13 












July 


23 


14 













*A11 white hens. 

STATE GAME FARM, 
Wm. N. Dirks, Supt. 
Hayward, Gal. 



Now Is the Time To Buy Eggs. 

See Advertisements in this Issue. Ad- 
vertisers report a bigger demand than last 
season. Better order quickly. 



22 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^f Game Breeder 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, APRIL, 1915 



TERMS : 
10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 



The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

Telephone, Beekman 8685. 

THE ATTITUDE OF THE CAMP- 
FIRE CLUB. 

Ernest Thompson Seton, ex-President 
of the Camp-fire Club, the best and most 
widely known naturalist in the club, in 
a letter to the Eitor of The Game 
Breeder, says : "The way to make 
American game abundant is to commer- 
cialize it." 

Many other prominent members of 
the Camp-fire Club are members of The 
Game Conservation Society and have 
said they favor the sale of game by all 
breeders in the best market, New York. 

Professor Pearson, Secretary of the 
National Association of Audubon Socie- 
ties, has endorsed this proposition. 

Mr. Marshall McLean, at Albany last 
week, representing (or misrepresent- 
ing?) the Camp-fire Club as its attorney, 
opposed the Machold bill which provides 
for the sale (in New York) of game pro- 
duced by breeders in other states only 
when the game is properly identified, 
tagged and shipped with the authority 
of the State Game Officers. 

We believe the majority of the mem- 
bers of the Camp-fire Club are in favor 
of the idea expressed in Mr. Machold's 
bill. If so why should their attorney 
oppose it? 

Here is a chance for the organ of the 
club to grind out one little tune. Is 
Field and Stream willing to have the 
tail wag the dog or should the dog wag 
the tail ? R. S. V. P. 



WRONG END FIRST. 

One of our Boston readers wrote that 
the professional game protectionist 
usually tackled the subject wrong end 
first. The wrong way of handling an 
important; subject recently has been em- 
phasized by the attitude of the profes- 
sional restrictionists towards the propo- 
sition to permit the game breeders in 
sister states to sell the food they produce 
in the New York markets, where the 
prices are the best, of course. Hun- 
dreds of thousands of deer, pheasants, 
wild ducks, quail and other game, mam- 
mals and birds are now owned by Ameri- 
can breeders. Some could send five or 
ten thousand birds, and even more, tb 
the market every season. There are 
hundreds of elk and deer on many game 
farms. 

It is proposed that the State Game 
Officers in the states where this food is 
legally produced shall properly identify 
the animals as the property of the breed- 
ers and tag the same with an official tag ; 
it is proposed that before any shipment 
IS made the shipper shall notify the New 
York State Game Officers about the 
.-shipment so that they can investigate it 
and see that the food belongs to the ship- 
per and that it is properly and legally 
shipped. 

A few professional protectionists 
claiming to represent two clubs, or the 
Game Law Committees of these clubs, 
say such shipments and sales of food 
should not be permitted under any cir- 
cumstances no matter what safeguards 
may be proposed. 

It can not be denied that during the 
last three years there has been one vio- 
lation of the New York Game Laws re- 
lating to the sale of game produced by 
industry — an important violation, which 
resulted in a fine of $20,000 being col- 
lected. The fact, however, that there has 
been one violation should not be made 
the excuse for strangling a great food 
producing industry throughout the na- 
tion. Because a stolen diamond occa- 
sionally finds its way to a pawn shop we 
do not insist that there shall be no bor- 
rowing or lending. We do not close every 



THE GAME BREEDER 



23 



l)ank in the country because money some- 
times has been loaned on stolen col- 
lateral. 

The remedy, of course, is to stiffen 
the criminal laws; to put the criminal 
■out of business (by revoking his license) 
and in jail; if necessary. The innocent 
and worthy producers of food should 
not be the sufferers on account of the 
wrong doing of one or even a half dozen 
wrongdoers, if that number should ap- 
pear during the next three years. A 
State Game Department that can not 
liandle a few dealers has no excuse for 
its existence. 

The people who make a business of 
game protection are well paid for their 
activities, no doubt, but there is no good 
reason why they should persistently 
"handle the subject wrong end first. 



economic importance and that they 
should represent all of the people, es- 
pecially the food producers and food 
eaters. 



GRATIFYING REQUESTS. 

Often we receive unsolicited requests 
for The Game Breeder from libraries and 
scientific and educational institutions. 
This is gratifying. The story of the 
*'more game" movement, as it runs 
through the magazine, we are told is 
well worth binding, and we are asked to 
prepare an index and title page for this 
purpose. From time to time we shall 
publish the portraits of prominent 
sportsmen, naturalists and successful 
game breeders who are contributing to 
make America the biggest game produc- 
ing country in the world. 



QUAIL ON TOAST. 

We predict it will not be long before 
an almost forgotten dish, "quail on toast" 
is restored and we believe the quail soon 
will be as abundant and cheap in our 
markets as the gray partridges are 
abroad. Many readers now^ are aware 
that game produced by industry from 
stock birds legally procured legally be- 
longs to the producer and that such 
game is not governed by the game laws. 
Intelligent State Game Officers do not 
often arrest breeders for producing food 
and we are glad to observe that many 
have accepted our idea that the State 
Game Departments should be of great 



INCREASING PREJUDICE. 

The State of New York may prevent 
the farmers in other states from selling 
the game they produce in New York. 
The State may insist that hundreds of 
thousands of dollars must be sent abroad 
annually for cold storage game, much 
of which is not very good to eat because 
of its long rest in foreign mausoleums 
before it is shipped to America. In 
some parts of the West it is the fashion 
to say, "We must keep moving or soon 
we will be as far behind the times as 
they are in New York." A lecturer re- 
cently made this statement from the 
platform. 

Other states may possibly enact re- 
taliatory measures and refuse to receive 
New York products. Wc do not think 
they will. They are too fairminded to 
indulge in such performances. Because 
New York goes wrong is no reason why 
more liberal states should go wrong. It' 
can not be denied that a decided pre- 
judice exists in some parts of the coun- 
try against New York. The refusal to 
permit farmers to sell the food they pro- 
duce will not tend to allay this prejudice. 

• 

A WARM RATION. 

Mr. Chas. J. Vert handed the Conser- 
vation Commission some rather hot 
stuff, at the Albany hearing, when he 
pomted out the fact that they said they 
needed the tax of from 18 to 24 cents 
on all trout sold. No other countries 
tax foods at this rate. 

Having helped Mr. Vert get the fish 
question properly settled, as we did at 
the start, we are counting on Mr. Vert 
to help us put game on the same basis. 
Trout are now freely sold by the breed- 
ers of all states in the New York 

markets. 

• 

EXCITEMENT. 

We have a note from the President 
of the American Game Protective Asso- 
ciation in which he says he was mis- 



21 



THE GAME BREEDER 



represented in the last issue of The 
Game Breeder when we observed that 
he opposed our suggestion that the reso- 
lutions offered at the Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel meeting be amended so as to dis- 
tinctly declare that game produced by 
breeders in other states should be sold 
in New York under proper regulations. 
He now says he did not oppose the 
amendment but simply insisted it was 
not a proper time to spring the subject. 
We had always been of the opinion that 
the proper time to offer amendments to 
resolutions was when they were pre- 
sented for adoption. This was the time 
selected and we were surprised to see 
the excitement displayed by the Presi- 
dent ; our wonder is increased now that 
he says he is in favor of the principle 
involved. Why should he get excited? 

In a second letter the president of 
the American Association says he is in 
favor of permitting the breeders of other 
States to sell their game in New York 
and that we misrepresented him for the 
purpose of injuring him. This idea is 
absurd. Our disposition is to be both 
friendly and helpful. 

It is not too late for the president of 
the association to make it known at Al- 
bany how he stands and his association 
should be able to exert some influence 
in securing the passage of a bill permit- 
ting the game breeders of other States 
to sell the food they produce. He was 
in Albany the day the matter was dis- 
cussed and it is fair to say he did not 
attend the hearing. 

We shall be glad to notice any effort 
he may make to aid what we think is an 
important and a very good cause. He 
certainly created the impression that he 
was opposed to the idea of permitting 
breeders in other States to sell their food 
in New York. We discussed this mat- 
ter with people who were present who 
formed the same opinion we did. We 
regret that we misrepresented him. 
Since the matter is still pending he easily 
can make a record by pushing the legis- 
lation at Albany, and we will gladly re- 
port just what he does. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters from Members of The Advi- 
sory Committee of the American 
Game Protective Association. 

[Wm. Brewster is the foremost ornitholo- 
gist in America. Dr. L. C. Sanford is a 
member of the Connecticut Fish and Game 
Commission. Dr. C. Hart Merriam is the ex- 
chief of the U S. Biological Survey and one 
of the foremost naturalists of America. Judge 
Beaman is one of the leading practical con- 
servationists in America, and the author of 
the Colorado Game Breeders' haw. With 
such advisers it seems strange to us that the 
President of the American Asociation should 
go wrong on an important question. — Editor.] 
Editor Game Breeder: 

Although the matter* is of no personal 
concern to me, one way or the other, I 
certainly think that the bill introduced 
by Mr. Machold in the New York As- 
sembly ought to prevail. For there 
would seem to be neither sense nor jus- 
tice in forbidding the sale of game "pro- 
duced by industry" in other states while 
permitting the sale of that imported 
from abroad. 

Yours sincerely, 

William Brewster. 

Cambridge, Mass. 



Editor of The Game Breeder : 

Regarding the bill introduced by Mr. 
Machold in the New York legislature, I 
entirely approve of it, and at the present 
time I am interested in a somewhat 
similar bill which is pending before the 
Connecticut legislature. If these bills 
become laws in the various states they 
will prove of value to the farmer, the 
sportsman and to the community in gen- 
eral. There ought to be joint action in 
this matter on the part of the commis- 
sioners of adjacent states. 

Yours very sincerely, 

L. C. Sanford- 
New Haven. Conn. 



Editor Game Breeder : 

I am very glad to know that a bill 
has been introduced in the New York 
legislature providing that citizens of 
other states engaged in legitimate game 



THE GAME BREEDER 



25 



farming may ship and sell in New York 
properly identified game raised on the 
farm. 

The present law forbidding such sales 
is a severe blow to a worthy industry, 
and I trust that it will be repealed at 
an early day. 

C. Hart Merriam. 

\\'ashington, D. C. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

I never was able to comprehend the 
logic of the game protection idea that 
prohibits the sale of game in a state, 
winch has been lawfully produced by 
breeders in other states, when properly 
identified. 

The laws of Colorado have for many 
years encouraged such sales of game 
and fish to the very great convenience 
and advantage of the consumers and to 
a corresponding saving of our own 
game and fish. This upon the logical 
idea that if it were necessary or advan- 
tageous to us to protect and save our 
own timber or coal we would invite the 
importation of those articles from other 
states. 

D. C. Beaman. 

Denver, Col. 

Charles Hallock, the Dean of Ameri- 
can Sportsmen, covered the subject fully 
when he said : "Truly we need a revolu- 
tion of thought and a revival of common 
sense." 



A Talking Dog and a Good Shooting 

Ground. 

By Dr. Henry Heath, Jr. 

I have been out with several good 
dogs, but "Doc," an English setter, three 
years old. a descendant of "Pinehill 
Leader" (registered), belonging to Dr. 
J. Arthur Dosher of this place (South- 
port, N. C), was hunting with me yes- 
terday and if ever a dog knew what his 
business is and could say it, he is the 
dog. He talks. That is, when he is out 
of your sight in the bushes, etc. He 
barks until you come to him and when 
you get there, there are the birds. More 
remarkable still, when he ascertains that 
you know he has them he quits barking. 



In other words he plainly says, "I have 
got 'em" and when you get there he 
keeps quiet meaning, "it's up to you." 
This happened several times yesterday 
afternoon. They had told me of the way 
he acted, several days before, but it did 
not impress me so much until I saw him 
work and may be I am not able to put it 
in a way to make it very vivid, but if 
you can tell of it in the magazine, with 
some catchy heading such as you editors 
know how to use, I should think it 
might interest some of the readers as it 
interested me when I saw it. 

It is possible that other dogs may 
have developed this trait, but I never 
knew a dog that made manifest by sound 
that he had the birds. I thought if any 
had heard of such a thing it would be 
you. Southport itself is a very pleasant 
spot in the extreme southeast coast of 
North Carolina at the mouth of the Cape 
Fear river, with a fine harbor and a 
beautiful view from the shore. Several 
islands, among which Baldhead Island, 
is remarkable, and a fort (Fort Caswell) 
add to the picturesque character of the 
view. Baldhead Island looks as suitable 
for a game preserve as Gardiners and I 
think it is already taken with that end 
in view. One may come from Wilming- 
ton on the train to Southport or by boat 
down the pretty Cape Fear river, a dis- 
tance of thirty-one miles in somewhere 
around a two-hour sail. The boat lands 
you near the quaintest little hotel, the 
Stuart House, run by a lady of South- 
port. It is right on the beach, and the 
first night I was here, as I heard the 
water lapping outside my door, I felt as 
though I was in "Peggoty's" boat, and 
wished I could have persuaded you, the 
day before, to share the sensation. The 
fare is fine and I am going away with 
receipts in my pocket for cookery which 
I hope to have duplicated as nearly as 
possible when I get home. 

My quail are taken from my hand 
when I come in from hunting trips and 
nicely broiled for breakfast or for sup- 
per. You must see you made a mistake 
in not accompanying me. Southport I 
think, is a city of some twenty-five hun- 
dred inhabitants and back of the town 



26 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and for a distance of from ten to forty- 
miles, we hunted. There are a consid- 
erable number of quail, wild turkey and 
ducks. Deer too. The gunners of the 
place gave me a hearty reception. We 
took two auto trips about forty miles 
into the wilds finishing with a trip across 
a little river over which a colored man 
ferried us in one of his boats, explain- 
ing that the others was "pretty well 
evaporated," as it was, seeing that the 
bottom was out. The "Ford" auto in 
which we traveled, carried five of us 
and sometimes three and sometimes four 
dogs, the roads right through the woods, 
enough to take the endurance of any 
car, but, very pretty country all around 
and looks fine for pheasants; lots of 
green stuff, grasshoppers, etc. South- 
port would be a very pleasant place to 
live in, and especially so for gunners, 
as they could make trips out from here, 
to so many good places to find birds. 
and I hope another year you can find 
opportunity to judge for yourself, and 
I hope in my company. 




THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring Ducks hundreds of miles— my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year — also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh frorn their native haunts — 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I haye the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. Mallards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write for My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 






I 

9 



WILD FOWL EGGS 

Canadian Geese, Black— Wood— Mallard— Duck 
and English Ring-Necked Pheasant Eggs 






t 



««««««'•« 



Last season the State of Massachusetts 
bought my Mallard Eggs exclusively. 

The Mallards are warranted pure bred 
ducks, captured wild. 



♦ 
♦ 
« 
♦ 

9 



«««««««« 



WRITE FOR PRICES AND OTHER INFORMATION 

JOHN HEYWOOD 

Box B, GARDNER, MASS. 



I 

t 
t 

t 



' •»'(»4>^^X>^H»«^«'»4»**««^<»«»««^»»«^»«>«^««0^«^«^^X><>^<^^,|^>^^^^^^^^^^^4^^^ \ 



THE GAME BREEDER 



27 




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HAND TRAP SHOOTING ON THE LAWN 



THE CLIFTON GAME and FOREST SOCIETY 

The Home of the Bob-White Quail. 

We offer for immediate or 
future delivery 5,000 Ring- 
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Golden Pheasants, Silver 
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For particulars ivrite io 
WM. A. LUCAS, (Curator on Quail) 

87 Thomas Street, - - New York City 

La.rgest 'Breeder and 'PtAnttr of ^ob- Whites 




28 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

THE GAME BREEDER 



150 Nassau Street 



New York City 



LIV£ GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs lor sale; several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 

GET WISE-RAISE PHEASANTS KoR PASTIME. 
Profitable and fascinating. Send for prices. CON- 
NECTICUT KARMS PHEASANTRY, Union, Union 
County, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advert'seraent in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

WILD GEESE, DUCKS, SWANS, ETC SEE Dis- 
play advertisement in this issue. WHEALTON WILD 
WATER-KOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island, Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (loti 

CASH PAID FOR PEA FOWLS. State age and sex. 
Will buy soo Ring Necks, 100 Amherst, 100 Goldens, loo 
Reeves. State your best price. HELEN BARTLETT, 
Cassopolis. Michi ga n . 

WILD DUCKS. GEESE, PHEASANTS. PEA FOWL, 
Gdineas, and Barred Rock Chickens of highest quality 
of perfection with a great show record back of them. 
OAK GROVE POULTRY YARDS, Yorkville, Illinois. 

FOR SALE.-WILD DUCKS AND GEESE, MAL- 
lards. Pintail, Snow Geese, White Fronts, Canadsts, 
for propagating and scientific purposes, at reasonable 
prices. All birds in good condition. Write GEO. J. 
KLEIN, Ellinwood, Kanscis. 

PEACOCKS. ALL KINDS OF PHEASAN'TS, WHITE 

African Guineas, for sale, pure blooded, non-related. I 

will buy Amherst, Reeves and Pea fowls. JOHN TAL- 

BOT, South Bend. Indiana. Q-i4-6m. 

WANTED-STAR AND SHORT STRIPE SKUNK. 
I (Sharp-tailed grouse For Sale — Narrow stripe skunk, 
fancy foundation stock, $5.00 pair. Wild geese and duck 
ggs in season. ENVILLA STOCK & FUR FARM, 
Cogswell, N. D. 

FI.VE VARIETIES PHEASANTS, WILD MALLARDS, 
wild geese, wild turkeys and other wild eame List 
free G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville, Illinois. 

WE CAN FURNISH PHEASANIS, WILD DUCKS, 
rare animals, birds of all kinds Pure bred dogs, Angora 
cats, monkeys, ferrets, etc Circulars free. DETROIT 
BIRD STORK. Detroit, Mich. 

FALLOW DEER, HARES, AND HUNGARIAN PAR- 
TRIDGES wanted .for March delivery : quote prices 
SAMUEL WILBUR, Englishiown, N. J. 

MALLARD DRAKES AND EGGS FOR SALE. Eggs 
at the rate of ?2.00 a setting. REDDEN QUAIL CLUB, 
Paoli, Pennsylvania. 

SELLING OUT— AMHERST PHEASANTS, three pair; 
, and four odd cocks in full plumage Versicolor, a trio. 
Golden, 4 females English, a pair. Dr. T. S. McGlLLI- 
VRAY, Hamilton, Ontario. 



PHEASANTS OF NINE VARIETIES; STOCK AND 
eggs, Ringneckscontractableby the thousand. DAISY 
FARM, San Lorenzo, California. 

FOR SALE— IMPORTED AUSTRALIAN PAPEBAR- 

RON geese, white India sacred doves, Australian crested 
pigeon, large bronze winged doves, pearl-neck doves and 
Mandarin ducks. THE AVIARY, East Lake Park, Lds 
Angeles, California. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price A J MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 



DOGS 

POINTERS AND FOX TERRIERS. 
TRY FARMS, Hope, Indiana. 



UNITED POUL- 



BEARHOUNDS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, Bl.OOD- 
HOUMDS. Fox, deer cat and lion hounds Trained 
and young stock. 50-page illustrated catalogue 5-cent 
stamp, ROOKWOuD KENNELS, Lexington, Ky. 

FOX, COOX, SKUNK AND RABBIT HOUNDS, that 
are right and broke to gun and field. Prices riyht, and 
stamp for photos and reply. H. C. LYTLE, Fredericks- 
burg, Ohio. 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

COONHOUNDS AND COMBINATION HUNTERS. 
Thoroughly trained. Free trial. Most elaborate coon- 
hound catalog ever printed, profusely illustrated, hand, 
somely bound. IOC St»UTHERN FARM COONHOUND 
KEN.VELS, Selmer, Tenn. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, BERRY, KY.. 
oft'er for sale Setters and Pointers, Fox and Cat Hounds, 
Wolf and Deer Hounds, Coon and Opossum Hounds, 
V^armint and Rabbit Hounds; Bear and Lion Hounds; also 
Airedale Terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser 
alone to judge the quality. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded. Sixty page highly illustrated, interest 
ting and instructive catalogue for ten cents in stamps or 
coin. THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, Berry, 
Kentucky. i /. 

AIREDALES— THE GREAT ALL 'ROU vD DOG. 
Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent ; 
have ouppies, grown dogs and brood matrons Send for 
large list. W. R. WATSON, Box 711, Oakland, Iowa. 

FOR SALE— TWO BLACK AND WHITE POINTERS, 
full brother and sister, year old this February. Have 
been shot over, two months last Fall on pheasants, grouse, 
quail and woodcock. The pups point back and retrieve 
and are good bird finders, but need to be steadied down. 
No pedigree The mother simply a good shooting dog, 
the father a direct descendant from Rip Rap The dogs 
will be sent for trial to a responsible person. Price $250,00 
for the pair. Please do not reply if vou don't mean busi- 
ness SPENCER BROTHERS, Kaolin P. O., Chester 
County, Pennsylvania. 



In writing (to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Youri for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



29 



CHESAPEAKE DUCK RETRIEVERS PURE BRED 
stotk \a'ural retnevers trom water or land. Pups, 
6 months old. for sale. CHESAPEAKE KENNEL, 
Lee Hall, Virgiiiia. 



ga.me,kce:per.s 



HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR SUPERINTE>JDENT- 

wanted by experienced man as above, 20 years' first-class 
character in England and America Understand raisina 
of all kinds of Game and Ducks, training and management 
of Dogs, trapping of all kinds of Vermin. B, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

SCOTCHMAN TRAINED TO FISH CULTURE AND 

game raising in England and Scotland wishes situation 
as superintendent or head keeper. Highest references 
from the well-known fish hatcheries and game preserves 
in England and Scotland. Age, 36 ; height, 5 feet lo inches. 
Personal reference from last employer in America. Apply 
CAIR.vS, Bloomingburg. Sullivan Co., New York. 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs. Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION.—EXPERI- 

enced in rearing Pheasants. Wild Ducks and other game 

birds. Also killing of vermin and dog training. H. H,, 

care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. g-i4-6m. 

GAMEKEEPER— WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January ist. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly experienced in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; 26 years' experien e. 
Can be highly recommended. R. J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder. 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION. UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F., care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street, New York. 



GA.ME K,GGS 



ENGLISH PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. $3.00 
the setting of 15 eggs, or $17 50 the hundred. C. T. 
KIMBALL, Beloit, Wisconsin. 

BOOK YOUR ORDER NOW FOR CHINESE RING- 

neck pheasant eggs. Oregon's famous game bird. $3 00 
per dozen, $v0.00 per hundred. OREGON BIRD & 
PHEASANT FARM, Beaverton, Oregon. 

WILD DUCKS, GEESE, PHEASANTS, EGGS FOR 
HATCHING. The State of Massachusetts buys my 
eggs exclusively. Why don't you ? My Mallards consist 
of about one thousand captured wild birds which fly about 
my preserve, building their nests and raising their young 
as in the wild home. I also offer wood, black ducks, Can- 
adian geese and pheasant eggs. Write for information. 
JOHN HEYWOOD, Box B. Gardner. Massachusetts. 

MALLARD DRAKES AND EGGS FOR SALE. Eggs 
at the rate of $2.00 a setting. REDDEN QUAIL CLUB, 
Paoli, Pennsylvania. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE- Contracts for the 
season. Gold and Prince of Wales, $25.00. WIL> 
LITS Pheasantry, WilliU, California. 



WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS $1. so per dozen; safe 
delivery anywhere, full blooded (send draft), no limit, 
large orders $10 co hundred. C. E. BREMAN^CO., 
Danville, Illinois. 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Ordernow for early delivery. $2 50 per setting 

of 15 eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthington, Minn. 

FOR SALE-PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
Golden and pure Lady Amherst. One pair year old 
hybrid birds for sale. E. R ANDERSON, So. Hamilton, 
P. O , Mass. 

RINGNECK EGGS $10 PER HUNDRED Contracts 
for the season. Gold and Prince of Wales, $'25.00. 
WILLITS PHEASANTRY. Willits. California. 

ENGLISH RING-NECK PHEASANTS' EGGS FOR 
HATCHING, from strong healthy stock. $3 a setting. 
$23 a hundred. Miss HOPE PICKERING, Hope Poultry 
Farm, Rumford, R. I. 



WE ARE NOW BOOKING ORDERS FOR 

Eggs for Spring delivery. Golden, silver, Prince-, 
of Wales, versicolor, reeves, amherst, ringnecks. 
We offer for immediate delivery golden silver, 
reeves, impeyan, peacock, versi-color pheasants 
and blue pea-fowls. Send 20 cents in stamps for 
colortype catalogue pheasants, etc. CHILES & 
CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



GAME BIKDS \<^ANTd> 

WANTED-IMPEYAN, ELLIOTT, SWINHOE. MAN- 
churian, fireback. peacock. Mexican Royal and other 
fancy stock pheasants ; also quail';. Bob-white, grouse, wild 
doves, squirrels, wood-duck, white peafowl and Java pea- 
fowl. F. WEINBERG, East Lake Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 

I AM IN THE MARKET F'OR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

WANTED— ANY OF THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES 
of pheasants. Must be in full feather and free from scaly 
leg and in good health. Swinhoe, Tragopan Satyr. Blyth 
Tragopan, Veilot FirebacK. White Crested Pheasants, 
Soemmering, Cheer Elliotts, Borneo Fireback. Pair Man- 
churian Eared that have bred in captivity. In addressing 
this office state age. number, sex and lowest cash price. 
CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. 



PIGEONS 

BEST HOMERS AND CARNEAUX PIGEONS TIME 
and money can produce. Pictures and description free. 
Write NATIONAL SQUAB FARM, Itasca, Texas. 

MISCELI^ANEOUS 

RUFFED GROUSE WANTED, STATE PRICE. 
A. I. W. , care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WANTED-ACORNS. STATE PRICE PER BUSHEL. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

RANCHED RAISED MINK FOR SALE— FOXES, 
raccoons, skunks, carneaux pigeons. TARMAN'S 
FUR FARM, Quincy, Pennsylvania. 

COMPLETE BOOK ON PHEASANTS, PAR. 
tridges, peafowl, quail, rabbits, deer, pigeons, poultry- 
etc , largely illustrated, colored vlates 75c. Colored cata. 
logue 230, illustrating 450 varieties. Exchanges made- 
U. Pheasantry, Pougbkeepsie, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



30 



THE GAME BREEDER 



BEAR CUB, HALF GROWN MALE, VERY TAME, 
never confined, bargain. Box 327, Lexington, Kentucky. 

WANTED—COPIES OF THE GAME BREEDER FOR 
June, 1913 ; September, 1Q13 ; April, 1914; June, 1914; 
December, 1914. We will pay 20 cents per copy for a 
few copies of the issues named in good condition. THE 
GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 

GERMINABLE WILD RICE SEED. SHIPMENT IN 
time for Spring sowing, shipped «ei as recommended 
by Department nf Agriculture. Order now. ROBERT 
CAMPBELL, Keene, Ont. 



Our Feathered Game 

Illustrated with Pictures of all 
American Game Birds 

$2.00 

The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. 



PHEASANT EGGS 

Place your order for eggs now — from the 
Pheasantries of the well-known Blooming 
Grove Hunting and Fishing Club, Pike Co., 
Pa. We have raised thousands of pheas- 
ants yearly for the past eight years and 
carry only the best stock of hardy, strong 
flying English Ring-necked birds. Our 
eggs are carefully selected and packed. 

Price $3.00 per clutch of 15, 
or $18.00 per 100. 

BLOOMING GROVE CLUB, 220 Broadway, N. Y. 



WILD DUCK EGGS 

from strong flying birds which were 
bred wild in a marsh. Original 
stock from The Game Breeders' 
Association. 

For prices write 

Dr. HENRY HEATH, Jr., 

ORIENT, L. I., N. Y. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

Practical Book on Duck Breeding 
for Sport and Profit 

$1.50 

The Game Breeder, 159 Nassau St., N. Y. C. 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties." 

Wood Duck's, Mandarins Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranlee'l. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $3.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 



rOR SALE 

TROUT AND TROUT HATCHERY 

On account of the death of Mr. J. S. 
Scully, we offer for sale the magnificent 
Berkshire Trout Ponds and Hatchery. We 
also have ready for shipment 50,000 finger- 
lings and any quantity desired of large 
size trout. Correspondence solicited. 

Address 

T. B. LEE, Agent Scully Estate 

GREAT BARRINGTON, MASS. 



More Game, and Fewer Game Laws 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breedef or sign your letters; ''Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



31 



MALLARD EGGS 

FOR SALE 

From Hand Raised Wild Mallards 

on Free Range, Stock 

Unsurpassed. 

$25.00 per 100, in lots of a 100 

110 to the 100 

$20.00 per 100, in lots of 500 

110 to the 100 

$3.60 per setting of 15 Eggs 
A. SCOXX, Gamekeeper 

Froh-Heim Game Preserve 
FAR HILLS NEW JERSEY 




Mallard Eggs From Strong 
Flying Birds 

April Delivery 
$25.00 per hundred 

Later Deliveries 
$20.00 per hundred 

Orders booked and filled in the 
order in which they are received 

T. A. H. 

Care of 

THE GAME BREEDER 
150 Nassau St., New York 



. . THE . . 



KINGSDOWN GAME FARM 



Kent, England 



Per 1000 
L. S. D. 
35—0—0 
27—0-0 



PHEASANT EGGS. All eggs guaranteed fertile. 
Eggs can be supplied from Black -neck — Ring-neck — 
Half-bred Mongolian. Prices greatly reduced owing 
to the war. 

Per 100 

Period of Despatch L. S. D. 

April 20th to May 7th 4-0-0 

May 8th to May 20th 3—0—0 

After May 20th 2-10-0 

On prepaid orders 110 eggs to the 100. 

Customers are strongly recommended to buy 
early eggs, the extra cost will amply repay them on 
the rearing field. These eggs are despatched the 
second day after they are laid so that they will 
arrive perfectly fresh in America and are so packed 
that they cannot be broken. Pheasant poults 
reared by contract. 

We shall be pleased to send an illustrated book 
of the farm to all gentlemen and gamekeepers who 
apply, and to give any information required. 

Major WILLIAM JERYIS LOCKER, Proprietor. 

Member of the Field Sports-Game Goild. 

Address all communications to 

GERALD APTHORP, Esq. 

SITTINGBOURNE KENT, ENGLAND 



DWIGHT'S PHEASANTRIES 

ESTABLISHED 120 YEARS 
Patronized by H.M. the King 



A Fine Selection of 

COCKS and HENS 

For STOCK 

Mongolians, Chinese, Dark-Necked 
and Ordinary Ring-Necked 

All Quaraateed Strong, Healthy Birds 

WILD DUCKS 

Pure bred and good fliers, 
suitable for Stock or Shooting 

Lowest Prices on Application 

M. DIVIGHT 

The Pheasaniries 
BERKHAMSTED, HERTS, ENGLAND 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or »ig-n your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



32 



THE GAME BREEDER 




COYOTES SHOT FROM AIR CRAFT. 



Inaiigurating a new epoch in the hunting 
world and showing the ever-increasing practi- 
cability of aviation, Fred Mills, one of the best 
amateur marksmen in California, one day last 
week shot and killed from an aeroplane driven 
by Glenn Martin at a speed of between sixty 
and seventy miles an hour, and at an altitude 
of three or four hundred feet, two coyotes 
which had been loping along in pursuit of 
quail, little suspecting that they themselves 
would soon be quarries. 

This stalking of game by aeroplane, which 
Martin declared marked the beginning of the 
revolutionizing of hunting, was accomplished 
in the San Fernando Valley, which was chosen 
by the ingenious aviator and the clever marks- 
man as a likely area to demonstrate the possi- 
bilities in a combination of hunting and flying. 

It was at 3.45 in the afternoon that Martin 
and Mills, in one of Martin's standard aero- 
planes, left the aviatoi"'s Griffith Park hangar, 
near Los Angeles, and mounted skyward, 



circled once over the aviation field in a fare- 
well to a few friends who were interested in 
the exploit, and then sailed away to the north, 
while the reports of Mills' Remington auto- 
loading rifle, fired in joyous anticipation of 
"bringing home the bacon," mingled with the 
whirr of the machine's motor. 

It was at 5.20, or an hour and thirty-five 
minutes later, that the aeroplane returned to 
the hangar, bringing a happy airman and an 
equally happy hunter, as well as three coyotes 
and two wildcats which Mills had shot about 
seven miles north of Roscoe, or about twenty- 
five miles north of their starting point. 

Two of the coyotes were shot by Mills from 
the machine as it sped through the air at a 
speed exceeding sixty miles an hour. The 
other animals were killed by him on the 
ground after Martin had made a landing in 
order to take into the aeroplane the two Mills 
potted while both he and they were in motion. 





Pennsylvania Pheasantry and Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 800 best 
Royal Swans of Knerland. I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS. CRANES. PPAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. 1 have fiO a<:res 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write rae before buying elsewhere— It will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



REAL ESTATE 

FOR S ALE^ a Tract of land suitable 
for a game park or preserve. 
Contains 2500 acres^ two lakes^ trout 
streams^ part cleared^ balance wood- 
land* Timber alone is worth the 
< price asked for the land. 

This tract is well suited for a 
Game Breeding Association or Shoot- 
ing Club. It is located on the Dela- 
ware River^ not far from Port Jervis. 

There are a number of buildings 
suitable for Club purposes. 

We have other properties adapted 
for Game Breeding Associations and 
Shooting and Fishing Preserves. 

For Particulars address 

W. G. LYNCH 

The W* G* Lynch Realty Co* 

Long Acre Building - - New York 



MAK Vd ^m\ 





fioo perYear 

iii i i MM iii ii i i ii i i i iii i i i ii i i i i n ii i iiii i imTTr 




Single Copies 10 y. .| 




TH E^ 



amtmt 




VOL. VII. 



MAY, 1915 



The- Object op this hagazine- is 

'to Make- North America the 5i6gest 

[Gahe Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 




Survey of the Field — Oklahoma's Opportunity — Oklahoma Game — 
Oklahoma a Good Egg State— The New Oklahoma Law and the 
Sportsman — New York's New Commissioner— AUen Hunters For- 
bidden — Hungarians in Ohio — Why Not Elephants ? — More 
Ducks — The Anna Dean Farm— A Prairie Grouse Department - 
Wild Ducks in Austraha. 



Breeding California Valley Quail - - - 
Pheasant Breeding in California 
Successful Planting of Quail on Long Island 
Quail Breeding on the Rockefeller Estate 

How We Raised 500 Quail 

Turtles and Bass - _ . - . 

The Rainbow Trout . . _ . 

The State Game Departments — Game Permits] in Michigan — 
Letter from Hon. Wm. R. Gates, State Game, Fish and Forestry 
Warden— The Oklahoma Game Breeder's Law. 

Editorials— It — A Meeting of Game Breeders— Cheering — Game 
Breeding in Oklahoma — Two Heroes - Correspondence — Book 
Notices, Etc. 



C. H. Shaw 

Mary P. Marshall 

Wm. B. Boulton 

Arthur M. Barnes 

Malcolm Dunn 

Prof. L. L. Dyche 

John Gill 




No. 2 







puslismed by 



THt GAME- conservation 50CIE:TY: Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A r9J>^v^-/s 



itiiiniiMiiiiiiini»iiuiMiiiiiirii(iiiiiiiiHiinMiiiiiiiiiniiNiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiriMniiiiniiiiiiiiiiuiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriHiHmHiiniii;.<i 




o. 



p 



^ 



Do Not Experiment, 

EXPERIENcIeD game breeders know that there 
no foods that 'will give such splendid results as 

— SPR ATI'S = 



Famous Game Rearing Meals Nos. 5 & 12 

when fed in conjunction with SPRATT'S CHICGRAIN, which 
is the best grain food on the market. 



Hunters Know 

of the value of keeping their dogs 
up to "top-notch" in the matter of 
health. They also know that this 
can only be done by judicious feed- 
ing with the best of biscuits. 

SPRATT'S 
DOG CAKES 

are now recognized in all sporting 
circles as the food par excellence for 
keeping dogs up to standard fitness. 
Dogs fed on Spratfs Food work 
better, behave better and live longer 
than those fed on any other diet. 



Write for samples and send 25c. for "Pheasant Culture." "Poultry Culture' 
sent on receipt of lOc, and ''Dog Culture " on receipt of 2c. stamp. 




SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

Factory and Chief Offices at NEWARK, N. J. 

Depots at San Francisco ; St. Louis ; Cleveland ; Montreal. New England Agency, 
Boston, Mass. Factories also in England and Germany 



L, 



Jl 



THE GAME BREEDER 33 




This Picture 
Shows the Effect 

of 
Hollow Point .22's 

Fresh soap offers practically the 
same resistance to a bullet as 
animal flesh. The illustration 
shows the course of an ordinary 
solid bullet (below) and of a 
Remington-UMC Hollow Point. 
In your opinion, which bullet will 
make sure of your game? 



etnin^ton. 

.22 Caliber Hollow Points 

• Have enormous shocking power. A hit means a kill 
always. Small game of high vitality cannot escape to die, 
wounded, in holes or cover. Accuracy is world-famous. 
And the cost but a trifle more than the ordinary .22. Made 
in .22 short, .22 long and .22 long rifle, in both smokeless 
and lesmok powders. 

Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 

Woolworth Bldg. (233 Broadway), New York City 



/ii 



34 



/PHE GAME BREEDER 



For 50 YEARS PARKER GUNS 
have led all other makes in dura- 
bility and efficiency 
among trap and field 
shooters 




^ 




With a range of price 
from $27.50 to $525, 

it fits all purses. 

QUALITY is the dominant 
feature in all grades of the 
PARKEE GUN. 



Booklet on 
20 Bores free 

Catalog oa appllcatloa to 



PARKER BROS., Meriden, Conn. S2Va7rrst 



Wire - Coops -Traps 

and other appliances for 

GAME FARMS and PRESERVES 



Strong heavy coops and fenders which vv^ill 
not blow over. 

Wire, all sizes, for Deer, Pheasants, Ducks, Quail 
and other game. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 

THE GAME BREEDER 150 Nassau Street, New York 



THE GAME BREEDER 



35 



THE AN4TEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 yeari' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands uneqnaled. 

Nevj Edition Just Oat. Illustrated, 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird doj subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, |i. 50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Our Feathered Game 



A HANDBOOK OF 



American Game Birds 



BY DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON. 



Illustrations — Shooting Pictures 
in color and Portraits of all 
American Game Birds 



$2.00 



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36 



THE GAME BREEDER 




^}lAf./>/^-^i 



"Otherwise than By Shooting" 

This picture was made to illustrate Field Sports in New York as prescribed by one of the 
ridiculous statutes known as " fool laws." 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please enter my name as a contributing member of The Game 
Conservation Society and. send me its publication, THE GAME 
BREEDER, for one year. $1.00 enclosed. 

Name 

Street 

City 

State .' 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



T¥. Game Breeder 



VOLUME VII 



MAY, i9t5 

co::> 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 2 




Hon. W R, Eaton. 



Oklahoma's Opportunity. 

A liberal game breeders' law has been 
enacted in Oklahoma providing, as all 
such laws should, for the profitable 
breeding of all species of game. Okla- 
homa is a splendid country for game, 
big and small, and as soon as the people 
of the State understand how to look 
after it properly and profitably vast 
quantities of game birds and deer will 
be produced. We predict that it will not 
be long before the game brings large 
sums of money to those who produce it. 
There is no good reason why the hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars which now 
are sent abroad for cold storage game 
should not go to Oklahoma; there is no 
good reason why a good part of the 
vast sums which are now sent abroad 



for live game should not go to Okla- 
homa. 

Some very active members of the 
Game Conservation Society reside in 
Oklahoma. A number of pheasantries 
and game breeding associations will be 
started and we predict that the sports- 
men as well as the farmers and those 
who like to eat game will be surprised 
and delighted when the results of practi- 
cal game handling become known. 

Oklahoma Game. 

Oklahoma is one of the best states in 
the Union for quail and other game 
birds and deer. Only a few years ago 
thousands of birds were 'trapped and 
sold alive at excellent prices. Since no 
one looked after the birds and everyone 
shot them who wished to do so, it would 
not have been long without the game 
breeders' law before the prohibition of 
shooting would have become as neces- 
sary in Oklahoma as it is in Ohio and 
in many other states which prohibit the 
profitable increase of game. 

Under the new law thousands of quail, 
prairie grouse, wild ducks, deer, pheas- 
ants, and other game, should be pro- 
duced and sold every year. The people 
of Oklahoma will bq interested to know 
that wild ducks can be reared on suit- 
able marshy tracts and about sloughs 
and small ponds cheaper than tame ducks 
can be raised ; prairie chickens and quail 
and pheasants can be produced much 
cheaper than poultry can be produced on 
any farm. Having these facts in mind 
the people of Oklahoma will be interested 
to know that the birds named sell readily 
at the following prices: 

Quail $15 to $25 per dozen in large 
lot's. 

Pheasants $2.50 to $5 per bird for 
common varieties. 



38 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild ducks $2.50 to $3.00 each for 
common varieties. 

Wood-duck, teal and others, $10 to 
$30 per pair. 

Prairie chickens $8 to $10 per pair. 

We can put the Oklahoma game bred- 
ers in touch with customers who will 
take thousands of birds at the above 
prices. 

We can furnish the names of people 
who have purchased thousands of birds 
at the above prices and who want many 
thousands more. There is a demand for 
hundreds of thousands of birds and the 
business of producing them is most in- 
teresting work for women as well as for 
men. We can give the names and ad- 
dresses of some women in other states 
(where the laws are not so favorable as 
they now are in Oklahoma) who are 
making a lot of money selling game 
birds and their eggs. Miss Helen Bart- 
lett, of Michigan, Miss A. Hope Pick- 
ering of Rhode Island, who advertise in 
the magazine, are successful game breed- 
ers. Mr. W. J. Mackensen, of Yardly, 
Pennsylvania, can furnish many names 
of customers who are successful in 
breeding for " sport. 

Oklahoma a Good Egg State. 

Hundreds of thousands of game eggs 
are now bought and sold by readers of 
The Game Breeder every year. The de- 
mand is increasing far more rapidly than 
the supply is increasing. The eggs are 
now sold by the thousand at the follow- 
ing prices : 

Wild ducks, mallards, $25 per 100 
eggs. 

Wood ducks, $100 per 100 eggs. 
Other species, $50 to $100 per 100 
eggs. 

Pheasants, common varieties, $25 
per 100 eggs. 

Pheasants, other species, $50 to $200 
per 100 eggs. 

It is not a difficult matter to gather 
and sell wild duck and pheasant eggs 
when you know how to keep the birds 
laying well. Quail eggs can be sold 
readily at $6.00 per dozen and more. It 
is an easy matter to have an abundance 
of quail nests and penned birds persist 



in laying when their eggs are gathered 
so that each little hen should produce 
more than $15 per year for its owner, at 
a low estimate. 

The eggs of prairie grouse will bring 
fabulous prices for some time to come 
and by selling the eggs thet birds quickly 
should be made abundant and kept so 
on many farms. They should be kept 
abundant for the very good reason that 
it will pay to keep them abundant on 
game farms. 

The New Oklahoma Law and the 
Sportsman. 

The sportsmen of Oklahoma will re- 
joice in the new law as soon as they 
understand it and take advantage of it. 
They should remember that it is an abso- 
lute natural law that when any check 
to the increase of game (shooting for 
example), is added to the ordinary 
causes of destruction (hawks, snakes, 
foxes and other natural enemies) the 
game must vanish from the earth, as it 
always has, because nature's balance Is 
upset. It is necessary, therefore, for those 
who would shoot to persistently destroy 
the natural enemies of the game to make 
a place for the shooting. In Ohio the 
sportsmen are not permitted to do this 
because field sports are prohibited and 
of course no one will look after the game 
when it can neither be shot nor sold. 
In Oklahoma the sportsmen have a rare 
chance to form inexpensive shooting 
clubs and to shoot all the game they can 
eat and some for those who do not shoot. 
Quite near New York our readers have 
formed quail clubs which haye excellent 
quail shooting every year at a cost of 
from $10 to $15 per gun. This is far bet- 
ter than the prohibition of shooting 
which is favored by those who see the 
game vanishing in many states. 

Every gun club and every trap-shoot- 
ing club in Oklahoma should have a 
game shooting ground. The Game 
Breeder will furnish information about 
the organization of the game breeding 
Associations of various kinds which now 
have excellent shooting every year. The 
magazine contemplates offering a sub- 
stantial prize for the Oklahoma club 



THE GAME BREEDER 39 

showing the best shooting and the big- our ridiculous game laws more of the 
gest bag for the smallest cost. It is same kind, 
possible for a good game breeding club = 
in Oklahoma to have excellent shooting Alien Hunters Forbidden. 
at grouse, quail and other game and at When Game Warden John C. Rein- 
hand-reared wild ducks and pheasants bold of Hackensack, was murdered by 
for a very small expense per gun. We an Italian hunter three years ago, in the 
shall not be surprised if some of the old Tappen Woods, the game wardens 
clubs which will be formed get their throughout New Jersey declared they 
shooting for nothing; possibly they may would have a law enacted to prevent an- 
declare a dividend. There is room other occurrence of the kind. The mur- 
enough for all who wish to shoot, on the derer had no license and was unnatural- 
farms which are now posted. Many ized. He escaped and was never located, 
farmers will encourage shooting on fair Gov. Fielder has signed a bill which 
terms. prohibits the hunting of wild birds or 

— other game by unnaturalized persons, 

New York's New Commissioner. and also forbids such persons to own 

Mr. George D. Pratt has been ap- rifle or shotgun or have them on their 

pointed as State Game Officer of New premises. — The World, N. Y. 
York at a salary of $8,000. The com- = 

missioners who were bounced by the Hungarians in Ohio. 
legislature, as we predicted they would The Ohio game warden is reported 

be, received $10,000 each, so that it to have received many favorable reports 

would appear that there is some economy about the so-called Hungarian partridges 

contemplated. (gray partridges) in Ohio. Thousands 

Mr. Pratt is a member of the Mon- of these birds were turned down last 
tauk Club, the Camp Fire Club and pos- season on many farms and undoubtedly 
sibly of some others and he no doubt is the birds nested in many places and 
aware that game usually is plentiful reared young birds. Last month we 
when it is properly looked after and printed an excellent photograph of a 
that it uniformly vanishes when it is nest full of partridge eggs which Gen- 
not properly looked after. As a good eral John C. Sparks, the capable State 
business man we are sure Mr. Pratt will warden, sent to The Game Breeder. Ad- 
agree to the proposition that no one can ditional birds will be liberated this year 
be expected to do anything unless it and we hope the experiment will be 
pays. successful. Thus far we believe there 

There are many intelligent men in the has been no gray partridge shooting 

Camp Fire Club like Mr. Ernest Thomp- anywhere in America due to the intro- 

son Seton, the eminent naturalist, and duction of these birds by State game 

members of many game producing clubs officers. Some of the clubs have been 

who know that the breeders of game successful in producing some shooting 

should be encouraged to produce game but thus far we have heard of no big bags 

profitably and not prevented by legisla- of partridges and none have appeared 

tion. Unfortunately these men are not in the markets. They are a common 

lobbyists or collectors of funds to save and cheap food in foreign countries. It 

the game by procuring additional fool- is to be hoped they may become com- 

ish enactments such as those which tend mon and cheap in America. We should 

to "protect the game off the face of the remember, however, that the abundance 

earth." and cheapness abroad is due to the work 

We believe Mr. Pratt will conduct of skilled gamekeepers and we fear we 

his office on business lines and that he will have no partridges in America until 

will prefer the advice of those who know we have the skilled labor to look after 

why our game vanishes to the advice of the birds properly, and protect them 

those who seem determined to add to from their numerous natural enemies. 



40 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Why Not Elephants? 

The World, N. Y., says : "The worst 
of the shortage of elephants due to the 
European war is that it cannot be offset 
by any stimulation of the domestic in- 
dustry." 

Why not ? The superintendent of the 
Zoo has a good sire on chain and no 
doubt there are a lot of female elephants 
in the country. The World should re- 
member what an alderman once said 
about the purchase of a male and a 
female gondola for the park : "Let 
nature take its course." 

More Ducks, 

One of our Western readers writes 
that he has decided to start a big 
wild ~ duck ranch and will hatch many 
thousands of eggs this season. This, of 
course, means tens of thousand next 
season. We are quite sure the New 
York markets will be ready to receive 
these ducks and other game birds which 
soon should come from the Western 
game ranches. 

Why should not the ranch owner 
breed deer, ducks, pheasants, prairie 
grouse, quail or any other desirable food 
for the market ? He has been permitted 
to breed cattle and sheep for many years 
and game preservers know that cattle 
and sheep have put an end to the shoot- 
ing on many ranches and farms. We 
are always glad to learn that game pro- 
duction is to go on even in places where 
it may seem to be an illegal industry. 
It really is not since the laws protecting 
wild game never were intended to apply 
to game produced by industry and 
owned by individuals. 

The Anna Dean Farm. 

A letter from the Anna Dean Farm 
indicates that a new department has been 
added. The words "Game Department" 
on its stationery look good to us. We 
understand the new department has sev- 
eral hundred game birds which means 
many thousands of eggs and young 
birds this season and the usual geometri- 
cal increase next season. The manager 
of the department says he cannot fill 
the orders already on hand. This in a 



State where our game breeders' law has 
not yet been enacted is "going some." 
Any up-to-date Western farmer will find 
it profitable to add a game department 
with a good gamekeeper to produce the 
birds and eggs. 

A Prairie Grouse Department. 

We hope soon to see "prairie grouse 
department" on the stationery of some of 
the big Western wheat farms where the 
grouse have been exterminated because 
the land has been too closely cultivated. 
A few wild rose bushes and sunflowers 
and a little prairie grass can be made 
to yield prairie chickens in good num- 
bers and at a minimum of cost since 
they will find most of their food in the 
stubbles. They must have rose hips for 
winter food and the briars for their pro- 
tection against the vermin. Sunflowers 
and other foods can be planted to advan- 
tage. 

We hope to see broiled prairie grouse 
on the New York bills of fare not later 
than A. D. 1916. 



Wild Ducks in Australia. 

A few years ago wild ducks were so 
numerous in Australia that no one could 
have imagined that protection would 
have to be given them. The birds have 
gradually diminished in numbers and the 
vShooting Times and British Sportsman 
says : "It may be in the future we shall 
have to adopt rearing to increase the 
numbers of birds and animals threatened 
with extinction." 



New Booklet on Hand Trap. 

The latest practical device for throw- 
ing clay targets is the hand trap. It is 
gaining in favor every day being used 
both by trapshooters and field sports- 
men. 

The Du Pont Company has issued an 
interesting booklet on its use and value. 
It describes the hand trap in detail, also 
the many pleasures derived from its use. 

The company will furnish a copy of 
this book on request. 



THE GAME BREEDER 41 

BREEDING CALIFORNIA VALLEY QUAIL. 

By C. H. Shaw. 

I consider the experiment of breeding hatch them either in an incubator or 

the California Valley quail which has under bantams, and brood them with 

extended over a period of three years, a bantams. The old birds bemg placed m 

success separate enclosures for each pair, allow 

■C-. / , , , , • ,1 J , 1 them to keep the eggs laid after this and 

First, by hatching the eggs and brood- ^.jj ^^P^^ ^^ -^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^jl ^^ ^^^ 

mg the young with bantams ; given a Youno- 

bantam hen inclined t-o stay with the I am prepared to dispute absolutely the 
eggs, a large percentage, averaging 90 theory that they will not rear their 
per cent., are hatched and there are no young, or even hatch the eggs, in cap- 
losses of young birds except from the tivity. The secret of success in this is 
hen stepping on them. We have kept to use breeding stock at least one gen- 
them with the hen in a coop until four eration removed from the wild condi- 
weeks old. tion. 

Using an incubator to hatch the eggs, Am sorry not to be able to send you 

the percentage hatched is even higher, any good photographs of these birds. I 

Our first attempts at artificial brooding have made very little effort to obtain 

were a failure, due principally to keep- any as this bird is so well known to 

ing the brooders at too high a temper- everybody on this coast, but I am en- 

ature and crowding. Later this method closing you two or three which may 

was worked out satisfactorily. serve to show the type. 

Perfect results were obtained by al- I consider this the finest game bird 

lowing the parent birds to hatch the eggs in this country, for many reasons. It is 

and rear the young. Even vi^here as very hardy and very alert in keeping 

many as forty-five pair of old birds were safe from its enemies. It roosts in trees 

in one enclosure, they hatched the eggs or other thick cover off of the ground, 

left with them at the end of the season, and is seldom harmed by animals or owls 

although it was necessary to remove the at night. It will adapt itself to civiliza- 

young birds when hatched to prevent tion and become entirely tame around 

injury by old birds which were fighting house grounds where not molested and 

over them. even thrive in a town. As a game bird 

My conclusion is that splendid results for the sportsman it has few competitors, 

can be had with raising these quail un- It may interest you to know that I am 

der the following system: Take say the in a position to ship say 250 of these 

first fifteen eggs laid by each female and birds to the East for breeding purposes. 



PHEASANT BREEDING IN CALIFORNIA. 

By Mary P. Marshall. 

Pheasant breeding is still in its infancy of pleasure, and it is a joy to know that 

in California, although it has become it is growing. 

quite popular of late years and will be Pheasants are raised easier than chick- 
permanently introduced all over the ens are, and they are more profitable, 
country. A visit to an aviary will con- They mature early, being full grown at 
vince one that these beautiful birds are five months. They are small feeders, 
not a picture dream, but one of Nature's and all diseases common" among chickens, 
charms for the eye. The culture of such i as roup, etc., seldom occur with 
them is a wonderful industry and full them. There are no culls as in so-called 



42 



THE GAME BREEDER 



fancy chickens. All varieties breed the 
first year although those two and three 
years old breed much better. Breeding 
qualities in these birds lasts from twelve 
to fifteen years. 

Some breeders and even government 
bulletins advocate feeding at regular in- 
tervals, while I find it better to keep 
feed before them all the time, as an 
adult bird will never overeat. I feed 
somewhat along my own lines, and I 
have an egg yield of ninety and ninety- 
five eggs per bird. The percentage of 
fertility in pheasant's eggs is remarkably 
great. I find "scratch food" particularly 
adapted to their needs. Green feed must 
be fed continuously and they must be 



kept busy. I sow wheat, oats or barley 
in the pen and let the birds work for it. 

Sunshine is necessary for their health 
and comfort as is sand for a dust bath 
to keep their plumage fine, glossy and 
free from insects. Pheasants prefer to 
sleep in the open, even in rain. 

Pheasant hens in confinement are poor 
mothers and for this reason common 
hens are used to hatch the eggs taken 
from the pheasants. For the best results 
I advise bantams (Cochin bantams are 
perhaps the best). 

I find pheasants very easy to raise ; 
I raise 80 per cent, of the hatches. It 
is all in knowing just how. Get the 
pheasant craze — they are a continual de- 
light ! 



SUCCESSFUL PLANTING OF QUAIL ON LONG ISLAND. 

By William B. Boulton. 



Two months ago I made my annual 
report to the club and called the atten- 
tion of the members- to the fact that 
there were so many quail on our pre- 
serve that their numbers might prove 
detrimental when the next nesting sea- 
son came around, and I incautiously 
showed this report to two of the officers 
of the American Game Protective Asso- 
ciation, who thereupon requested that I 
should speak on this matter at the pres- 
ent conference. 

During the autumn of 1904 there was 
an extremely heavy snowfall at the east- 
ern end of Long Island averaging over 
fifteen inches on the leyel in the open 
fields and about thirty inches in the 
woods where the underbrush helped to 
bear up the snow. At the end of that 
storm I went out on an inspection of our 
property and after two or three hours' 
search I found three quail, one of which 
I shot. When I picked it up I found 
that it was nothing but a framework of 
skin and bone covered with feathers. We 
immediately took stepsi to obtain a fresh 
supply of birds to be delivered to us the 
following spring, as we were convinced 
that our native stock was practically ex- 
terminated. For the years 1905, 1906 



and 1907 we obtained birds from Mr. 
Payne of Wichita, Kansas, which came 
from Oklahoma and the Indian Terri- 
tory, and we liberated part of these birds 
early in March of each year and late in 
December toward the close of the shoot- 
ing season. The old native Long Island 
stock were large plump birds, averaging 
7 to 7^ ounces in jveight, while these 
liberated quail did not run much, if any, 
over 5^ to 6 ounces. 

As the years passed by we noticed that 
the descendants of these liberated birds 
were reverting more and more to the 
type of the natives both in size and color, 
Until to-day there are many which are 
scarcely distinguishable in their markings 
and weight from the original Long Isl- 
and stock. 

This experiment, if indeed it may be 'j 
called an experiment, of restocking our 
preserve has been so highly successful 
that I think it is worth being called to 
the attention of all shooting clubs and 
individuals in this vicinity who may suf- 
fer from a temporary shortage of quail. 
With us it was noti altogether an experi- 
ment because I find that as far back as 
1891 the Flanders Club purchased quail 
coming from Virginia, North Carolina 



THE GAME BREEDER 43 

and Tennessee, which were liberated in shooting on lands which do not belong 

the more accessible portions, of our ter- to them, without paying for it and by 

ritory. Some few birds were obtained counting onj the good nature of the land 

from Florida and these retained their owners for their negative permission to 

distinctive marking through the third do so. 

generation, being much darker on the A weakness of our legislation lies in 

throat and breast. These birds were the fact that not sufficient police power 

even smaller than the Western quail but is provided to secure enforcement and 

caught up with them in about five years, the further fact that even if there were 

After the almost total destruction of sufficient police power it would be exceed- 
our native birds by snow storms the lib- ingly difficult to obtain a strict enforce- 
erated quail, let out in March, nested ment of the bag limits. A greater weak- 
freely and replenished the preserve by ness still lies in the fact that our legis- 
the following autumn. The Florida lation is not founded on the right prin- 
birds increased more rapidly, that is to ciple. It aims at protection only by en- 
say, produced larger bevies than any of deavoring to restrict the number of birds 
the birds that we liberated, but we very killed instead of striving for means by 
quickly desisted from buying them be- which the amount of game can be in- 
cause we found that a whole bevy would creased. If the amount of game in a 
light in trees instead of on the ground ; district can be increased the restrictions 
although it is fair to say that subse- as to the bag limit may become a matter 
quently they outgrew this habit and acted of indifference. In extreme cases too 
like the original native birds. much restriction of shooting may even 

The success of the transplanting I effect a decrease. For example, it is a 

have just described really depended on well-known fact that on a Southern plan- 

the maintenance of our preserve. Left tation where all shooting of quail is 

to themselves, without adequate protec- stopped for a series of years the number 

tion, the birds would have succumbed of birds on that plantation tends to de- 

quickly to the free shooting that prevails crease. 

on unprotected land. This brings up the On the other side of the ocean, and 

important question of the value of the especially in England and Scotland, they 

preserve in the protection of game, go at the problem in a very different 

Probably no other one factor is of way. Instead of a mass of laws which 

greater importance than the preserve in would require for their enforcement a 

increasing the supply. Speaking broad- great police force they adopt this course : 

ly, there are two ways of attempting to for all practical purposes they say to the 

protect game — that practiced in this land owners — "You are more concerned 

country and that practiced in Europe in the preservation and increase of the 

and it is worth while to attempt to com- supply of game than any one else. If 

pare the two methods. In this country we can make it worth while, your selfish 

we have a mass of detailed legislation, interests will turn you into a great vol- 

all well meant and with the honest pur- unteer army of game wardens and save 

pose of protecting the game supply. The the state the expense, bother and care 

chief characteristic is a multitude of re- of maintaining a police force for the en- 

strictions regulating how game shall be forcement of its game laws." So the 

shot or captured and imposing limits on land owners have been given the benefit 

the daily or season's bag for each indi- of two rather simple weapons of legis- 

vidual sportsman. Practically all these lation — a trespass law which has effec- 

laws ignore the rights of the farmers and tually reduced the army of shooters. An 

other owners of the land and whether by interesting point about the gun licenses 

intention or not, are framed almost en- in England is that they are sold to all 

tirely in the interests of that very large alike, resident or non-resident, for short 

class of sportsmen who come from the periods or for the year, and the highest 

cities and towns and who obtain their price charged is $15. 



44 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Given these two weapons to protect 
themselves, the land owners soon realized 
that the crop of game was in its way as 
important as any other crop, and that if 
they themselves did not care to shoot, 
the right to shoot could be sold to others 
for a very respectable sum. They also 
found that the larger the crop the more 
they could get for it, so their selfish 
interests made them study how to in- 
crease the supply and they succeeded so 
well by improved methods of keeping 
down the vermin, by limiting the sea- 
son's bag for the ground and by increas- 
ing the food supply that game in England 
and Scotland has, during the past hun- 
dred years, increased by leaps and 
bounds. The same results could in a 
measure be obtained in this country pro- 
vided similar methods were used, but 
first the people must be educated as to 
the rights of the land owners and the 
immense value of preserves or restricted 
areas as a factor in increasing the game 
supply. It has long been a source of 
wonderment to me that the farmers of 



this country do not realize what they are 
losing by neglecting their game crop. In 
the South some progress has been made 
in this direction, but the farmers there 
have yet to learn that it lies completely 
in their own power greatly to increase 
the stock of game on their lands. Care- 
ful killing of vermin and a limit placed 
by the owner of the covers on the bag 
that might be taken during the season 
would accomplish wonders. Is it not 
possible that by combining the best of 
our laws and that part of the English 
and Scotch laws best adapted to condi- 
tions here that we could make progress 
far more rapidly than under present con- 
ditions ? 

In conclusion, I desire to acknowledge 
my indebtedness to Mr. Frederick S. 
Mead of Brookline, Mass., who has aided 
me greatly in preparing the latter part 
of this statement, and I venture to say 
the Game Commission of his State 
would be able to profit largely if they 
should call on him to give them the 
benefit of his experience. 



QUAIL BREEDING ON ROCKEFELLER ESTATE. 

By Arthur M. Barnes. 



Ever since Mr. William Rockefeller 
built Rockwood Hall at Tarrytown, N. 
Y., he has endeavored to stock the 
grounds with quail. 

The method which he employed was 
to purchase Southern birds in New York 
and liberate them. This did not prove 
successful, as the quail soon disappeared, 
there being no grain fields to attract 
them. 

In the fall of 1912, Mr. Herbert K. 
Job visited the estate on several occa- 
sions, explaining fully the details of his 
system of quail breeding. 

A supply of breeding stock was ob- 
tained from the West, and they arrived 
in good order January 17, 1913, their 
wings were clipped and they were placed 
in a large enclosure in which there was 
plenty of cover of evergreen boughs and 
low board shelters. 

In the early spring a man was secured 



to give his whole time to the game, and 
I wish to give Tom Warne credit for the 
hard season's work he put in with quail 
and other game birds. We had not only 
the usual enemies of a game preserve, 
hawks, crows, foxes, skunks and 
weasels, but also the predatory animals 
of civilization, cats, rats and even the 
pet bull terrier at the Hall could not be 
convicted of murder till he was caught 
with the goods in the shape of a bantam 
hen, the mother of twenty little quail. 
This was the third large brood of tender 
age that he had rendered motherless. 

We built a dozen breeding-cages 8 feet 
long by 4 feet wide, covered with wire 
netting. We now use y2 inch square 
mesh to keep out weasels and have the 
frame set upon another frame of 2x4 
lumber to which is nailed a strip of J4 
inch netting sunk six inches in the 
ground; to discourage animals from bur- 



THE GAME BREEDER 45 

rowing under the cages. A small box ever, having learned dependence on the 

coop was also found very convenient to mother hen they would follow her even 

drive birds into when found necessary when fully grown, 

to move them. To one used to handling hens with 

About April 1 we mated up the breed- chickens it is surprising to approach a 

ers, putting a pair in each breeding cage, brood of quail after they are well feath- 

which we had prepared by placing hem- ered and see them fly away when sur- 

lock boughs within for shelter from the prised, leaving the hen clucking franti- 

sun. cally. They do not go far and soon 

The meadow in which these dozen return to the parent, 
pairs of birds were placed was soon Careful attention in closing up the 
made cheerful by the spring call of the coops at night is a necessary detail. When 
bobwhite and by the last of May we the lawns were parched for want of rain 
began collecting eggs from the pens, we put the late broods in the meadow 
Thereafter they were gathered every where the grass is left uncut for the 
few days and as soon as we had twenty- benefit of bird life. Swaths were mowed 
five eggs they were set under a bantam through the long grass as for pheasants, 
hen. Nests were made on the ground The birds reared in the meadow grew 
in special coops of three nests each, well, but never became as tame as those 
which gave the hens a small yard for reared on the lawns where gardeners, 
feeding and dusting. Buff Cochin ban- lawn mowers, tree doctors and a flock of 
tams were found to make the most sat- sheep were continually present, 
isfactory mothers although some silkies Three good-sized patches of buck- 
were used the first year. The percen- wheat were planted and these doubtless 
tage of fertility in the eggs ran very high tended to hold many birds that might 
and a number of hatches gave us as otherwise have left the region. The 
many as twenty of the little bumble bees Hungarian or gray partridge also enjoyed 
from twenty-five eggs. the grain and have reared nice broods 

The season of 1913 was unusually which have stayed with us, 

favorable for rearing game, at least in The season mentioned we reared to 

Tarry town, June, July and August being maturity about 150 quail. While we 

very dry and what showers we had came find that they have not always consulted 

generally at night. the county map and settled on Mr. 

The young birds were left on the nest Rockefeller's land, many of them have 

with the foster mother for a day after remained in the vicinity and have reared 

hatching and then if weather was favor- broods. We send feed to parties as far 

able they were removed to a small coop, as two miles distant who inform us of 

Around this coop had been placed a a covey and are interested enough to 

fence of Yz inch wire netting ly-z feet feed them. 

high, fastened in place by stakes driven The feed used for young birds was 
in the ground. (The small quail try dry bread crumbs mixed with hard 
hard to get out and there must be no boiled eggs, fed five times a day for the 
chinks under the wire.) For a week the first few days, gradually changing to fine 
brood would remain in that yard learn- pheasant meal to which was added ants' 
ing to follow the hen and feed at her eggs or baked flies caught in wire traps, 
call. When we felt sure they had This was fed four times a day. Mag- 
learned their lesson they were removed gots were substituted occasionally, 
to the spot where we wished to rear When a month old we began feeding 
them. Some would be placed on the fine grain and in a few weeks they had 
lawns near the Hall, where a similar only this ration, being then able to obtain 
coop was provided and a similar yard themselves all the animal food neces- 
surrounded them, but soon that yard was sary. 

taken away and they were free to run The question of raising quail for food 

over the grass in search of insects. How- is not worrying us very much just yet. 



46 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Others will tell you of greater numbers 
reared, but the principal point I wish to 
make is that the natural shyness of the 
quail can be overcome when they are 
reared quietly with bantam hens within 
sight of passers-by. 

To-day we have some of these com- 



panionable birds which were reared un- 
der the terrace of Rockwood Hall, being 
fed daily from a certain window of the 
house, and they are so tame that they 
show no alarm when the grain rattles 
down on their backs. 



HOW WE RAISED 500 QUAIL 

By Malcolm Dunn. 



There is no reason to my mind why 
quail cannot be raised profitably, but they 
should be by themselves, and not where 
there are a lot of pheasants in process 
of rearing. You can give better atten- 
tion to them under such conditions. Last 
year we hatched out 600 and raised 500. 
I consider that good. The main thing is 
to feed light and not to overcrowd. 

In the spring of 1913 the New Jersey 
Game Commission received a shipment 
of quail from Oklahoma. We put twen- 
ty-five pairs in small movable pens and 
ten pairs in a pen one hundred feet 
square. They began to lay the last week 
in May. We got forty-six eggs from 
one pair. Some of them did not lay at 
all. We gathered the eggs once a week 
and always left two eggs in the nest. We 
tried taking all the eggs away from 
some, but we soon found out it paid to 
leave some in the nest, as when we took 
all the eggs away it stopped the laying 
for approximately a week. We put the 
eggs under small bantams, and when 
they hatched out, after twenty-four 
hours, we placed them in a field as we do 
young pheasants. We found out that 



the birds do much better if each brood 
is kept separate. We start feeding them 
with a custard — three eggs to a cup of 
milk. We use this for a day or two, 
then we feed a mixture of seeds, Spratts, 
chick grain, canary seed, ant eggs, and 
green food. We feed every three hours 
until a week old. 

We raised 350 in 1913 and last year 
we raised 500. In the winter we put 
them in a large pen so they will have 
lots of room. The secret is to have pens 
enough to keep moving them into fresh 
ground. 

The ten pairs we put in the large pen 
started laying sooner than those in the 
small pens, but we did not get so many 
eggs from them. Therefore, we think it 
best to pair them off in the small coops. 
We hatched quite a number out in the 
incubators,' then put them with the ban- 
tams that hatched out. They did all 
right. We leave the birds out in the 
field until half grown before we put them 
in the pens. All the surplus cock birds 
and those we did not need for breeders 
were put out through different parts of 
the State. 




THE GAME BREEDER 



47 




A Turtle Trap. 



TURTLES AND BASS. 

By Prof. L. L. Dyciie. 



It was about 4 o'clock in the afternoon 
when we had an unexpected opportunity 
of making observation which we con- 
sidered a rare one. We were dehghted 
to see a turtle of the variety usually 
called a "skillypot" or "painted turtle" 
slowly making its way up this narrow 
channel in the direction of the bass nests. 
This turtle came along in turtle fashion, 
slowly and carefully, until it got within 
five or six feet of the nearest nest. Be- 
ing on the bottom and moving slowly the 
fish did not seem to notice the turtle 
until it got within a short distance of 
them. When the fish did recognize the 
turtle they immediately became very 
much excited, swimming over and 
around their nests and around and over 
each other. Finally one of them made 
a frantic dart at the turtle, which was 
an animal with a shell some six or eight 
inches long and some five or six inches 
wide. After the first two or three move- 
ments there was such a commotion in the 
water that it was hardly possible to see 
just what took place. Apparently the 
bass grabbed the turtle by the head, 
which would seem an unreasonable thing 
to do. However, this was the best ob- 
servation we could get at the time of 
what took place. The turtle was turned 
upside down, at any rate it appeared 
that way. 

All three bass made an attack on this 



animal, swimming past, around and un- 
der the turtle and striking the animal in 
some manner. It was not possible to see 
whether they grabbed the turtle with 
their mouths or whether they raked the 
animal with their dorsal spines. Ap- 
parently they grabbed him by the feet 
or tail or most anywhere with their 
mouths. They must have used their 
sharp dorsal spines as they passed under 
the animal. The turtle was on his back 
or side part of the time, and was appar- 
ently turned over by the fish grabbing 
it. Finally the turtle got his feet in 
some weeds, which enabled him to get 
to the bottom, and he immediately dis- 
appeared under a bunch of water plants 
that was near the shore. The fish were 
very much excited and swam up and 
down the small inlet for some time. It 
took several minutes to become quiet 
and settle down to their regular work of 
guarding and fanning the eggs in the 
nests. 

Since the above observations were 
made we saw a rock bass grab a turtle 
by the head and turn it completely over. 
At the time we were watching the rock 
bass perform on its nest at a distance of 
not over two feet. The turtle, a small 
one with a shell not over five inches in 
length, came along almost crawling into 
the nest before it was discovered. The 
fish grabbed the outstretched head of the 



48 



THE GAME BREEDER 



turtle and there was an immediate com- 
motion in the water that left the turtle 
on its back a foot or more from the 
nest. The turtle immediately disappeared 
and the fish was soon settled over the 
nest that it was guarding. 

The nests were visited the following 
morning, but no observations of import- 
ance were made. We caught three 
snakes with which to perform experi- 
ments by turning them loose near the 
bass nests. However, we did not suc- 
ceed in inducing the snakes to swim 
near the bass as we desired. The snakes 
would not perform as we hoped they 
would. They were stubborn and 
mulish, and always went in the wrong 
direction. We have on other occa- 
sions seen bass tackle snakes and dis- 



able or even swallow them. One 
snake that was apparently too -large 
to be swallowed was so disabled that it 
could not swim except in irregular 
curves. During the afternoon of the 
same day these nests were destroyed by 
parties who were seining for minnows, 
and who were unaware of the presence 
of the bass nests and of their value to a 
student of fish culture. A minnow net 
had been pulled over the beds, and the 
following day there were no eggs in the 
nests and no bass present guarding them, 
which goes to show that if the nests are 
disturbed by pulling a seine or net over 
them the parent fish do not return, and 
the eggs, if not destroyed or eaten by 
small fish, would soon die of white 
fungus disease. 



THE RAINBOW TROUT. 

By John Gill. 



Perhaps before this chapter is in 
print there will be no Rainbow trout. 
The debate of the question whether the 
Rainbow and Steelhead trout are one 
and the same has waxed warmer for 
some years among learned men. The 
greatest American ichthyologist. Dr. 
David Starr Jordan, has during the past 
twenty years held four opinions on this 
question, and may even now haVe 
changed his mind again. This readiness 
to reconsider his views on the subject 
indicates a broad and receptive attitude, 
and it also indicates to the layman that 
this question is a difficult and puzzling 
subject. 

In one of his earlier descriptions Doc- 
tor Jordan has written: "There are no 
circumstances in which I have not been 
able to distinguish the Rainbow from 
the Steelhead." In a work by Doctor 
Jordan and Charles F. Holder (1909) 
the opinion is less positive, as follows: 
"Very careful comparison of specimens 
leaves no doubt that the two are dis- 
tinct." 

Two years ago Doctor Jordan told the 
writer of this article that he thought it 
probable the two types sprang from a 



common parentage and might be one and 
the same fish. The apparent difference 
between a Steelhead recently from the 
sea and a typical adult "Redside" or 
Rainbow is surely greater than the dif- 
ference between a Rainbow of a pound 
weight and a Clark trout of that size; 
yet we have no confusion of the two 
latter. The greatest chance for doubt 
is when the Steelhead, in the spawning 
season, acquires a red side and enlarged 
head and jaws. 

Let us leave out any consideration of 
the fish least known to both scientist and 
angler — Mason trout, which is believed 
to inhabit only streams west of the Cas- 
cade summits — and take into account the 
type which most anglers know as Rain- 
bow or Red side, found only in streams 
of the Cascades and eastward, at least 
in Oregon, Washington and northward. 

The first and most prominent distin- 
guishing trait of a Rainbow adult fish, 
of two years old and more, is the pe- 
culiar red stripe along the side, follow- 
ing pretty closely the median line from 
the opercle to the tail. This mark in 
the Rainbow is a narrow stripe, not half 
an inch wide in fish of a pound weight. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



49. 



and not much wider than half an inch 
in very large specimens of even five 
pounds and more. Both sexes bear this 
mark, but it is brighter and bigger on 
males. 

On a typical Rainbow this stripe is 
densely red, nearly Indian red, and so 
clearly defined that it appears as if 
painted with one sweep of a narrow 
paintbrush. It is not a rosy blush such 
as we see on the side of a male Cut- 
throat, but a dense, livid, narrow bar. 
This mark is more brilliant at the be- 
ginning of the mating season, and grows 
misty and faint after spawning. I think 
this mark is more pronounced on Rain- 
bows of waters east of the Cascades. 
Certainly no such vivid band is seen on 
Clark or Mason or Dolly Varden trout, 
nor ever on the Steelhead of my ac- 
quaintance. On any but the Rainbow, 
where a rosy or purple tint is seen on 
the sides of the trout it is a thin, trans- 
parent tint, extending over more than 
half the side of the fish vertically. In 
the Rainbow typically marked the stripe 
is vivid, dense in color, sharply defined 
— not shading faintly away into the gen- 
eral color as it does in other species — 
and is a narrow stripe, not more than 
one-sixth the width of the side. 

There seems to be no good reason for 
naming this fish "Rainbow," but it is a 
splendid name. In no trait save the red 
side does he resemble the bow of heaven 
more than his fellows; and the stripe 
instead of being seven-hued is one bright, 
dense, bricky red. A trout so marked 
is certain to have all the other traits 
of the Rainbow and to be no more 
readily mistaken for any other species 
than a carp for a salmon. 

But not all Rainbow are thus distin- 
guishable. Until two years old, when 
they first spawn, all the family are much 
less vividly marked, and may be readily 
mistaken for Clark trout when the lat- 
ter are adult and in spawning dress, 
when the male Clark or Cutthroat trout 
has the wide, faint, rosy sheen which 
then appears. 

Old males of the Irideus or Rainbow 
family frequently take on livid, blotchy 
colors and the whole fish is sometimes as 
red as a spent dog salmon. 



From an Angler's Diary these notes 
will help to fix the "stripe" feature. The 
reader will observe that one lot of fish 
is from Blue mountain waters and the 
other from Cascades. 

"May 28, 19—, Reuben Montgomery 
displayed in a window a lot of fine trout 
caught by him in the McKenzie river. 
One was a big Dolly Varden, 28 in. long, 
weight Syz lbs. dressed. Eight were 
Rainbows of one to two lbs. weight. 
The red bar on side was very striking; 
as deep as if painted in Indian red. On 
every fish this extended from opercle to 
base of tail." 

"Oct. 28, 1912, Mr. Finley has fine 
specimens of Rainbow^ caught yesterday 
in Umatilla by C. K. Cranston. All typi- 
cal, no doubt about them. Eight to 
twelve inchs long. All bear distinct 
stripe of deep red along median line 
and a little below. In the largest this 
stripe is half inch wider midships. It 
begins rather narrow and fainter in color 
at the opercle and diminishes near the 
tail." 

Two great ichthyologists state that the 
"Rainbow may be known by the num- 
bers of scales in a line from head to tail, 
which is about 120." Both say its scales 
are larger than in the Steelhead or 
Clark trout. 

One of these scientists is Doctor David 
Starr Jordan. He named this trout 
"Rainbow" in 1870, the specimen being 
taken in San Leandro creek, near Ala- 
meda, California, 

The description given by Doctor Jor- 
dan of the Rainbow seems to be fol- 
lowed implicitly by many writers, though 
very incomplete, and even questionable. 
The statement that "its head is larger 
than any other Pacific trout" is open lo 
question, the pictures illustrating the ar- 
ticle showing the Clark trout's head to 
be the larger of the two. Perhaps the 
Rainbow trout of California differs from 
ours, but two-year-old Rainbows, eight 
to ten inches long, from Oregon waters, 
show a considerably smaller head length 
than Clark trout of the same size. In 
unusually large fish of either species, es- 
pecially breeding males, the head is dis- 
proportionately large. 

In all under-size trout the tail is much 



50 



THE GAME BREEDER 



more deeply indented than in mature, 
large specimens. All big Rainbows I 
have seen show a "square" or nearly 
right line along the margin of the tail 
when fairly extended. This is so notice- 
able a feature that in many places this 
trout is commonly called "square-tailed 
trout." 

Certainly the shape of the Rainbow's 
tail distinguishes him easily from Clark 
trout, which has a rounded hollow in the 
mid-margin, and the corners or lobes 
gracefully rounded. In the Rainbow 
the points are sharply angular, as in the 
Steelhead. The difference between the 
tails of all the salmon is easily learned, 
but is so little as to confuse Steelhead 
and Rainbow. 

One of the characteristics given by 
Doctor Jordan is : "Head obtusely ridged 
above."' Several other writers copy this 
description exactly. It is plain that 
they have taken the Doctor's statement 
without question, permission or exami- 
nation. Look for the "obtuse ridge," 
and see if there's any such feature. 

Doctor Jordan says, "the mouth is 
smaller than in Cutthroat," and so it is. 
This difference is evident. The gape of 
the Rainbow from tip of jaw to corner 
of the mouth is about one-fourth less 
than in Cutthroat. The angle of the 
open mouth in Rainbow is just in line 
with front edge of eye-pupil. In Cut- 
throat the mouth extends back to middle 
of pupil or farther. 

In young and medium size fish the 
Rainbow's head is distinctly more blunt 
and rounded than in any other of our 
trouts. In this feature there is a notice- 
able difference from the adult Steelhead, 
which has a more pointed upper jaw. 

Comparison, I believe, will establish 
this difference as one certain mark of 
recognition. There is an "innocent" air 
in the profile of the Rainbow, due to this 
roundness of the front of the maxillary. 

The eye seems to be a very notable 
point too. In recent examinations I have 
observed the eye of Rainbows to be 
peculiar by reason of its larger size — 
one-fifth greater diameter than that of 
Clark trout — and by a staring look which 
the latter has not. The iris in Rainbow 



is broader than the Clark and of a clear, 
pale yellow, with rarely any spots in or 
on the iris, while the eyes of many 
Clark trout examined recently show the 
iris to be almost covered by dark spots 
resembling the spots of the surrounding 
skin. The narrow band of iris surround- 
ing pupil is also of a darker, rich gold. 

My opportunity for observation of 
Rainbow is rare, and I do not venture to 
be dogmatic concerning him; but I hope ^ 
this peculiar difference in sizes and 
marking of the eye may prove to be dis- 
tinctive. 

One other peculiarity marking the 
Rainbow is the usual presence of spots 
on the cheek or opercle, black and round 
Color and shape of these spots, as well 
as the peculiarity of their placing, seems 
a distinct trait. 

The general color of the Rainbow, ex- 
cept in breeding season, differs little 
from Clark trout, except the red bar. 
Sometimes a Rainbow is very profusely 
■ spotted, but usually the Clark trout is 
more numerously speckled. 

There is, I believe, a real dift"erence in 
the majority of the spots, in shape. I 
thought two years ago that in the spots 
was a sure mark. Specimens of Rain- 
bow then seen were marked mostly by 
little crescent-shaped spots, sometimes 
joined together making a "3," and with 
occasionally a third crescent attached to 
the "3" ; but I found some Clark trout 
with the same marks. However, the 
spots of the Clark are mostly larger, and 
are of an irregular circular or hexagonal 
type. The spots on base of tail are 
larger and blacker in the Clark trout. 

The variation of spots and colors in 
all trout, at certain times, is so great 
that few naturalists would risk an opin- « 
ion on these alone. The Rainbow fre- f 
quently has red stripes under the mandi- 
ble, but they are narrow. The Clark 
trout is sometimes almost without these, 
but where present they are twice as 
broad as in a Rainbow of the same size. J 
Both fish return from the sea with " 
hardly a trace of this throat mark. 

Authorities referred to above state ■ 
that the Rainbow is the typical trout of I 
coastwise streams, and that it is not 



THE GAME BREEDER 



51 



found east of the Sierra Nevada or 
Cascade ranges ; yet in the same chapter 
the waters of the Klamath lake and its 
tributaries are cited as the most re- 
markable Rainbow trout fishing in 
America. 

The great typical Rainbow is not 
found in Oregon or Washington coastal 
rivers, though abundant in Rogue river 
above Grants Pass. Neither is it seen 
in the west-side streams of the Willam- 
ette. 

■ It prefers, apparently, the large 
streams of the Cascades, both east and 
west slopes, and appears to be more 
abundant in the southern rivers — -Mc- 
Kenzie, Rogue, Klamath, Shasta, etc. It 
finds its way up the Sacramento to 
Goose lake, and is also abundant in 
Deschutes, Klickitat, White Salmon and 
a few other mid-Columbia rivers. 

Some of the finest specimens ever 
seen in Portland came from Silvies 
river, a large stream flowing into the 
land-locked waters of Malheur lake. 

Lewis river is the farthest west that 
I have seen Rainbow trout, but prob- 
ably Kalama has some too. 

Naturalists speak of Rainbows (as 
distinct from the Steelhead) being 
found in the waters of the sea on British 
Columbia and Alaskan coasts. Dolly 
Varden trout of great size swarm in the 
Alaska seas in the neighborhood of the 
rivers, and thousands are canned as 
salmon on Bristol Bay, in the southeast 
corner of Behring Sea. Several times 



I have seen Clark trout among young 
salmon from Puget Sound, and they had 
been netted in the same haul at sea. 
The eastern brook trout goes to sea from 
St. Lawrence river, and returns silvery 
and spotless as "seatrout." The ten- 
dency of this tribe of trout seems to be 
to go to sea, at least from adjacent 
rivers, and the Rainbow is probably no 
exception. Of the Clark trout's going to 
sea and return we know a little — more 
than is known of any of the others, yet 
very little. There are few things else 
that I would rather know with certainty 
than these times of the trout's sea-going, 
the trout's reasons therefor, the changes 
produced in their traits by this sea- 
dwelling, and their return to the rivers. 
The difficulty of observation is very 
great, yet some of our coast streams 
seem to offer ready opportunities. 

As to the sporting quality of the Rain- 
bow, most of my readers are better in- 
formed than I. Men who write good 
books upon angling give this trout high 
praise, and some say he is the greatest 
fighter among the trouts. Most eastern 
writers think him inferior in this trait 
to the eastern brook trout. 

The Rainbow has been successfully 
planted in many waters of the eastern 
United States, in Europe ' and in New 
Zealand. In the latter country it has in- 
creased enormously both in numbers and 
size, the giants of the tribe being numer- 
ous there. 



THE STATE GAME DEPARTMENTS. 



Hon. William R. Oates, State Game, 
Fish and Forestry Warden of Michi- 
gan, in a letter to The Game Breeder 
says : "This State has not yet attempted 
to legislate in the interest of game breed- 
ers. 

"I have noticed the law which has re- 
cently been passed in Indiana and I am 
sure that a law of that kind would not 
be acceptable to people of this State as 
no safeguards have been thrown around 
this measure which would protect the 



wild game, therefore this department has 
not recommended such a bill, although 
we have been urged to do so by a few 
people who desire to enter into the busi- 
ness of propagating game in private en- 
closures. 

"If this State should ever adopt a 
law, having this for its object, I am sure 
it will be safeguarded to such an extent 
as to preserve the wild game of the 
State. 

"This State has not yet attempted the 



52 



THE GAME BREEDER 



tag system, although this department has 
urged the Legislature to enact a law of 
this kind, as I believe it is the only 
way by which bag limits can be enforced. 
We are not sure, however, whether the 
Legislature will consider the proposition 
at this session or not. 

"We are satisfied that game breeding 
is a very interesting industry and we 
expect, in the near future, to establish 
a State farm by which experiments along 
this line can be made. This department 
has extended to any person who desired 
to raise game in captivity, all the en- 
couragement possibly under our existing 
laws. Where game can be legally se- 
cured from other States or during the 
open season for taking same, we are is- 
suing permits by which they can be held 
in captivity during the closed season, 
for the purpose of propagation and sci- 
entific investigation." 

[We prefer a game breeders' law similar to 
that of Vermont (and some other States) 
which provides for a low priced breeders' 
license and the regulation of the sales of game 
as food, either by requiring invoices as the 
Colorado law does or by requiring tags as 
other State laws do. Game owned and pro- 
duced by breeders should, of course, be sold 
as food, and we doubt if the Indiana law will 
result in much wild game being so sold. If 
the law works badly it can be amended. The 
experiment is interesting and creditable. — 
Editor.! 

The Oklahoma Game Breeders' Law. 

[The following sections of the new Okla- 
homa game law are excellent. Oklahoma soon 
should produce game abundantly. — Editor.] 

AN ACT RELATING TO FISH AND GAME 

AND PROVIDING FOR AND ENCOURAGING 

THE BREEDING OF FUR-BEARING 

ANIMALS, FISH AND GAME. 

Be it enacted by the people of the 
State of Oklahoma: 

Section 4. The State Game and Fish 
Warden is authorized to issue permits to 
propagate fur-bearing animals, game and 
fish, and he shall make rules governing 
such industries. 

Section 5. The application for a 
breeders' permit shall be signed by the 
applicant and shall describe lands or 
waters owned or leased by such breed- 
ers, and such other facts as may be re- 



quired by the State Game and Fish 
W^arden. 

Section 6. When it appears that the 
application is made in good faith, the 
State Game and Fish Warden shall is- 
sue a permit upon the payment of the 
fee of two dollars, which, with the fees 
for tagging hereinafter mentioned, shall 
be paid to the State Game and Fish 
Warden. 

Section 7. Licensed breeders shall be 
permitted to sell and transport fur-bear- 
ing animals, game and fish at all times, 
alive for propagation, and alive or dead 
for food, during such seasons as the 
State Game and Fish Warden may de- 
scribe. 

Setcion 8. Such fur-bearing anmals, 
game or fish shall be properly identified, 
either by marking the packages or by in- 
dividual tagging, as may be described by 
the State Game and Fish Warden. 

Section 9. The licensed breeder sell- 
ing game illegally procured from lands 
outside of his premises as described in 
his application for his license, or who 
violates the law relating to fur-bearing 
animals, game or fish, or a regulation 
made by the State Game and Fish War- 
den, except as permitted by this act, 
shall forfeit his license and be fined not 
more than one hundred dollars and in 
addition thereto shall be fined and im- 
prisoned as prescribed for the viola- 
tion of the laws relating to fur-bearing 
animals, game and fish. 

Section 10. A person owning a nat- 
ural pond of not more than twenty 
acres, or an artificial pond, entirely upon 
his premises, stocked at his own ex- 
pense with fish artificially hatched or 
reared, may take fish from such natural 
or artificial pond at any time for the 
purpose of propagation or consumption 
as food, provided, the sources of the 
water supply of such natural or artificial 
pond are entirely upon his premises, and 
the fish do not have access to such pond 
from water not under said owner's con- 
trol, or from waters stocked at the 
State's expense; provided, that it shall 
be unlawful to take, catch, possess, or 
fish for any black bass, small mouth 
bass, large mouth bass, strawberry or 



THE GAME BREEDER 



63 




Coming Events of Clove Valley Club— "More Wild Fowl. 



calico bass, rock bass (otherwise known 
as goggle-eye) crappie, white perch, 
brook trout or speckled trout, from 
January 31st to May 1st, provided, 
further, that no bass under eight (8) 
inches in length shall be taken, nor shall 
more than ten (10) bass be taken in 
any one day ; and provided, further, 
that it shall be unlawful to use in any 
manner whatsoever the young or any 
bass or game fish for bait. 

Section 12. There is hereby appro- 
priated out of the Game Fund, to be 
expended under the direction of the 
State Game and Fish Commission in the 
preparation and issuance of bulletins for 
the purpose of encouraging the breeding 
of game and fur-bearing animals, the 
following: 

For the year 1916, $500.00 
For the year 1917, $500.00 

Passed by the Senate, February 18, 
1915. M. E. Trapp, President of the 
Senate. 

Passed by the House of Representa- 
tives March 6, 1915. A. McCrory, 
Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives. 

Approved this, the 5th day of April, 
1915. R. L. Williams, Governor of the 
State of Oklahoma. 



Back Again. 

One of our Long Island, N. Y., read- 
ers writes that about twenty-five of his 
wild ducks which went South last fall 
are back again and nesting in the marsh. 
We hope some of these birds will be 
banded next season and it will be inter- 
esting to learn just where they go. Since 
some undoubtedly will be shot at differ- 
ent points on the line of migration it 
may be possible to learn just what course 
they take when going South. 



More Reindeer. 

Importation of reindeer from Siberia 
two decades ago was begun with the aim 
of furnishing a food supply and clothing 
to Eskimos in the vicinity of Behring 
Strait. Now there are 47,266 reindeer, 
30,532 of them being owned by natives. 

Although the state is said to own the 
game it appears that the natives own 
about two-thirds of the reindeei 



Professor Ingat Khan, lecturing on the 
influence of music upon animals, said at 
the sound of the bag-pipe, cows began 
to jump and dance." but whether this 
meant approval or disapproval the pro- 
fessor did not say. 



51 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^f Game Breeder 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, MAY, 1915 

TERMS: 
10 Cents a Copy — Sl.OO a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, |i.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

Telephone, Beekman 8685. 

"IT." 

One of our Illinois members who 
placed a small advertisement of three 
lines in the magazine writes to say that 
it instantly sold hundreds of eggs. It 
would seem that there will be no danger 
of our wild life vanishing so long as a 
three line ad works wonders. 

Our advertiser says: "Your Paper Is 
It!" 



Davis, of the Conservation Society, that 
three cheers be given for Talbott of In- 
diana and Eaton of Oklahoma. 



A MEETING OF GAME 
BREEDERS. 

At the meeting of game breeders at 
the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel a number of 
interesting papers were read. These 
have been published in a bulletin issued 
by the American Protective Association. 
We reprint the three most important 
papers which describe quail breeding on 
Long Island, New York, at the State 
game farm in New Jersey, and at Mr. 
Wm. Rockefeller's, ' Rockwood Hall. 
Several score of sportsmen and State 
game officers attended the meeting. Con- 
sidering the fact that it was not an- 
nounced in The Game Breeder or the 
sporting magazines the attendance was 
as large as could be expected and the 
meeting was a great success. 



GAME BREEDING IN OKLA- 
HOMA. 

Three cheers for Oklahoma! 

Hon. Walter R. Eaton, a member of 
the Game Conservation Society, is en- 
titled to the credit of placing a good 
game breeders' law on the books of 
Oklahoma. In a letter to The Game 
Breeder, Mr. Eaton says : "I appreciate 
the assistance you have rendered in the 
matter. In my presentation of the law 
to the Legislature I was: able to get peo- 
ple interested in the game propagation 
question who heretofore felt that all 
game laws were simply for the purpose 
of affording the town man the oppor- 
tunity to come out and trespass on the 
farmer's land. When we convince the 
farmer that he too is to be benefitted 
by the game laws then we will have 
much better game laws than we have." 

This is well said and quite true. Our 
readers are aware that one of the fun- 
damental ideas of The Game Breeder is 
that since the farmers own the best 
shooting grounds their interests must be 
considered in our game lawmaking. Pro- 
fessor L. H. Bailey said long ago: "I 
am sure that your fundamental idea that 
the farming interests should be consid- 
ered in game protection laws is sound." 
We printed this opinion on the cover of 
the March number in order to give it 
emphasis and importance, especially with 
members of the Legislatures in the 
States where we expect to have our game 
breeders' laws enacted. 



CHEERING. 

People out on Nassau Street who 
heard the cheering^ the other day are in- 
formed that it followed a motion by Mr. 



At this writing it appears that the 
"otherwise than by shooting" nonsense in 
New York has gone where the woodbine 
twineth. We fired several broadsides at 
this nonsense and for the last time we 
reprint our cartoon illustrating field 
sports as they were constituted in New 
York by confirmed mischief makers. 
Farewell, "otherwise" nonsense, we are 
glad you're going. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



55 




John W, Talbot, of Indiana. 

Two Heroes. 

We print in this issue the portraits of 
two prominent members of The Game 
Conservation Society who won, recently, 
two important battles for the right 
against a field so full of prejudice, poli- 
tics and graft that even the dean of 
sportsmen at one time regarded it as 
impregnable. 

Mr. John W. Talbot, of Indiana, is 
entitled to the credit of putting through 
a most liberal game breeders' law in his 
State. 

Hon. Walter R. Eaton is entitled to 
the credit of putting through a most lib- 
eral game breeders' law in his. State — 
Oklahoma. 

Both States undoubtedly will produce 
game abundantly and we promise their 
people that the food shall be sold in New 
York. We propose to dine on some 
Western game served in New York 
within a year. Some one may go to jail, 
possibly, but we think on the show-down 
the game politicians of the old school 
will pass; if they do not, they surely 
will hear from the people if some of 
them go to jail for serving or eating food 
legally produced on the farms under laws 



specially enacted for that purpose. The 
more game crowd is an enthusiastic 
crowd, and some have volunteered in 
writing to go to jail in other States if 
they be foolishly arrested. Possibly we 
may show a New York diner behind 

the bars. 

• 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

When my customers ask for a periodi- 
cal on game breeding I always recom- 
mend The Game Breeder as being the 
only thing worth while. 

Helen Bartlett. 

Cassopolis, Mich. 

The Game Breeder Is " It." 

Advertising Manager, Game Breeder: 

A few days after my little ad ap- 
peared in The Game Breeder it sold 300 
eggs to go to Massachusetts, 100 to go to 
New York and just now I have another 
good order. Your paper is it ! 
Yours for more game, 
Danville, 111. C. E. Breman. 

The Boone and Crockett Club, N. Y. 

Editor The Game Breeder: 

Sickness and absence from home pre- 
vented my acknowledging yours of the 
3d. 

Though not authorized to speak for 
this club, I am personally strongly of 
the opinion that the commercial produc- 
tion of game should be encouraged, and 
I can see no reason why I should not be 
allowed to kill and sell a pheasant which 
was raised in my barnyard as well as 
the ducks and chickens which often eat 
out of the same trough in winter. The 
former cost me most and I am as good 
a judge of time and season in one case 
as in another. 

Also the idea that birds will ever in- 
crease under the present laws so as to 
provide "free shooting for all men" and 
meet the demand is a hazy dream. 

I cannot endorse the "Machold" bill 
because I have not been able to procure 
a copy and am going West to-night. 
Yours truly, 

W. A. Wads WORTH. 



56 



THE GAME BREEDER 



The Spraying of Plants. 

The spraying of plants and trees with 
poisons in order to destroy insects un- 
doubtedly has resulted in the destruction 
of some birds. 

Eaton says "the opinion is usually 
held that this danger is largely exagger- 
ated; but when we consider the fact 
that dead birds in any case are very 
rarely seen, the fact that we find so few 
which have been killed by spraying op- 
erations is not at all surprising. Dead 
birds are quickly put out of sight by 
cats, dogs and skunks, or buried by the 
sexton beetles and other scavangers. 
Sick birds almost always fly away to 
some shelter, an instinct which is uni- 
versal among wild creatures, and thus 
the deadly effects of the spraying upon 
bird life are rarely observed. There 
can be no doubt that many birds such as 
cuckoos and orioles feeding continuously 
on poisoned caterpillars finally succumb 
to the cumulative effect of the arsenical 
poisons which are most commonly em- 
ployed. There is some remedy in the 
fact that birds will rarely touch larvae 
that show evidence of sickness, and 
probably never touch them after they are 
dead. The author, however, has exam- 
ined two cuckoos which evidently died 
from arsenical poisoning, and other in- 
stances have been reported by Brewster, 
Ridgway and Forbush, and by many in- 
habitants of New York State. We be- 
lieve that the decrease of both species 
of cuckoos in the apple districts of west- 
ern New York is partly due to their 
gluttonous desire for caterpillar diet. 

We have often wondered how much 
damage was done to the quail and other 
game birds by spraying poison. Since 
no spraying was ever done on any of 
the places where we have made game 
birds plentiful we have had no means of 
observation. The farmers should under- 
stand that it is an easy matter when 
gamekeepers are employed to make not 
only the game birds but all other birds 
so quickly overabundant that there will 
be barely enough insects to go round and 
the birds, of course, prefer their insects 
alive and unpoisoned. 

It is well known that in places where 



game birds are preserved it is necessary 
often to supply extra insect foods or 
substitutes. Ant eggs and insect prep- 
arations are sold, and the Spratts of 
Newark, New Jersey, manufacture and 
sell large quantities of crissel, a substi- 
tute for insect food. 

One thing is certain, it is far more 
interesting to have an abundance of game 
on a country place than it is to spray 
the place with poison. The game birds, 
especially quail and grouse, quickly can 
be made very profitable. We can find 
purchasers for extra stock birds at from 
one to several dollars per bird in large 
Readers who have quail or grouse 
to sell will please write. These are sold 
without the necessity of advertising and 
the sales are increasing. 



Pheasant Breeding in Ohio. 

Senator Wickline's bill providing that 
it shall be lawful for citizens of Ohio 
to engage in the business of raising and 
selling English, ring-neck, Mongolian or 
Chinese pheasants, upon the payment of 
a fee of fifty cents for a breeders' license 
to breed the birds for commercial pur- 
poses, passed in the Senate and General 
John C. Speaks, chief game warden, 
writes that he thinks the bill will be 
favorably acted upon in the House. 

The bill should, of course, provide for 
licenses to breed all species of game. All 
game is! good to eat and the people who 
wish to produce any kind and the people 
who wish to eat it should not be regarded 
as criminals. Pheasants are very good 
to eat but wild ducks are easier to rear 
and equally good on the table. Most of 
the States which have breeders' laws 
permit the profitable breeding of wild 
ducks. Some States now permit- the 
breeding of all species of game. Okla- 
homa has just enacted a law which per- 
mits the breeding of all species. Farms 
in Oklahoma are more valuable on this 
account than farms are in States which 
do not encourage the profitable produc- 
tion of game. 

Members of the Game Conservation 
Society are requested to purchase from 
those who advertise. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



57 



More About Naked Ducks. 

The law, intended to stop the importa- 
tion of bird feathers for miUinery pur- 
poses but which resulted in sportsmen 
being held up when returning from Can- 
ada provided their ducks did not appear 
in the altogether, or "naked" as one of 
our Boston readers said, is one of the 
numerous silly laws which the news- 
papers often term "fool laws." 

The Audubon Association, which did 
most to secure the passage of the law, 
joined our Game Conservation Society 
in asking for a change in the treasury 
ruling to prevent the annoyance of 
sportsmen which was not contemplated 
when the law was enacted. 

To-day the Assistant Secretary of the 
Treasury, Mr. A. J. Peters, who had 
charge of the matter, sends us the order 
made and provided to protect the return- 
ing sportsman. 

The order indicates that the law re- 
mains in the "fool law" class. Sports- 
men should not be required to leave "not 
less than $10," or any other sum condi- 
tioned that they later file depositions 
proving that they have burned or other- 
wise destroyed their wild duck feathers 
after the birds were un-dressed, or 

dressed, as poultrymen say. 

•* 

Deer Breeding in Minnesota. 

My experience in propagation of deer 
was very interesting. I made a start 
with one pair, a buck and a doe of the 
Minnesota red deer. I put them in an 
enclosure about 50 by 100 fenced with 
wrie netting 8 feet high and had a small 
shed in which they could go if they 
wished, but I found that the only tmie 
they seemed to care for cover was in 
exceedingly hot weather. 

They were very much contented and 
seemed to enjoy, more than anything else 
the presence of the school children who 
would stop and play with them on their 
way to and from school. 

I fed them on table scraps, corn and 
oats and gave them a little hay once a 
day ; never more than they would eat up 
clean. They were also very fond of 
pumpkin and beets and would eat any 
kind of weeds. They kept the ground 



absolutely free from vegetation but still 
they did well and at the end of four 
years I had thirteen deer. 

I then thought that it was a shame 
to keep them in such a small enclosure 
so I fixed up for them what I considered 
an ideal park, on my Blue Mound Farm, 
where there was plenty of shade and an 
abundance of grass and some huge rocks 
under which they could take shelter if 
they wished, but they seemed to miss the 
company which they had in town and did 
not do well. The result was at the end 
of another three years they were all 
dead. 

There is one thing in the connection 
of propagating of game of which the 
laws of most of the States are entirely 
wrong : 

They permit a person under certain 
condition to raise game in captivity but 
will not permit them to be sold or 
slaughtered. This cuts off every possible 
means of revenue so a person really has 
nothing but the pleasure to reward him 
for the care he is put to and he is sure 
to entail a considerable expense. 

If the different States would encour- 
age raising game in captivity and with 
reasonable restrictions permit them to be 
slaughtered or sold at certain seasons of 
the year, then the raising of game could 
be made a profit as well as a pleasure 
and when there is profit and pleasure 
combined it gives that necessary encour- 
agement which spells success. 

I do not expect to again engage in 
raising any kind of game in Minnesota 
while the present laws exist, but I am 
expecting to make my winter home in 
the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas, 
where I own considerable land, which 
is an ideal location for all kinds of game 
and as I like the laws of Texas much 
better than those of Minnesota, I believe 
that I can associate profit with pleasure 
in that locality. 

R. B. HiNKLY. 



Wood pigeons and rooks are said to 
have become a perfect pest in parts of 
Yorkshire, England. "It has been sug- 
gested that night shoots should be ar- 
ranged for. 



58 



THE GAME BREEDER 



A Good Book and Two Bulletins. 

We take pleasure in announcing a new 
book entitled, "Propagation of Wild 
Birds; a Manual of Applied Ornithol- 
ogy/' by Herbert K. Job, economic or- 
nithologist in charge of the department 
of Applied Ornithology of the National 
Association of Audubon Societies. This 
book, which soon will be issued, will con- 
tain much matter of especial interest to 
game breeders. In it are described in 
full practical detail the methods success- 
fully used in America by various experts 
in the propagation of upland game-birds 
and water fowl, and also methods of 
attracting the smaller land birds. It is 
fully illustrated by photos from life and 
will be published early in May by 
Doubleday, Page & Co., $2 net. To avoid 
mistakes, it has been read before publi- 
cation, in part or entire, by such experts 
as D. W. Huntington, editor of The 
Game Breeder, F. C. Walcott, Dr. 
George W. Field, A. G. Mac Vicar and 
T. Gilbert Pearson. 



Further to help the popular more 
game movement, the National Associa- 
tion of Audubon Societies is publishing, 
for free distribution, two handsome and 
extended pamphlets, with half-tones and 
colored frontispieces, on propagation of 
upland game birds and propagation of 
American water fowl, in a first edition 
of ten thousand each. These are also 
by Mr. Job, being abbreviated treatment 
of the same, subjects as found in the 
book, where they are thoroughly han- 
dled. The first will be out before we 
go to press, the other shortly after. We 
want to place them where they will do 
good. Those who will be helped by them 
are invited to write to The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 



Outings and Innings. 

A man promptly gets thirty days for 
killing a cat and a boy ninety days for 
killing a rabbit. It is safer to kill hu- 
man beings and get — off. 






WILD FOWL EGGS 

t 

t Canadian Geese, Black — Wood— Mallard— Duck 

I and English Ring-Necked Pheasant Eggs 



i 



«««««««« 



Last season the State of Massachusetts 
bought my Mallard Eggs exclusively. 

The Mallards are warranted pure bred 
ducks, captured wild. 






«««««««« 



WRITE FOR PRICES AND OTHER INFORMATION 

JOHN HEYWOOD 

I Box B, GARDNER, MASS. 



9 

I 



THE GAME BREEDER 



59 




(THE DU PONT HAND TRAP 



The Most Popular Event 

at a house party or week-end gathering is usually the 

TRAPSHOOTING 

contest. Men and women of all ages join in The Sport Alluring with the same enthusiasm. 
Spacious grounds and permanent installations are not necessary to enjoy this facinating 
pastime. At your home, in camp or on your 
motor boat you can shoot to your heart's content 
by using the Du Pont 

HAND TRAP 

to throw your targets. It weighs only six pounds and will 
fit into suitcase with targets 
and shells. 

Price, $4.00 delivered! 

For our free booklets on trap- 
shooting, write Depl. 354S. 

DU PONT POWDER CO. 

Established 1892 
Wilmington Delaware 



^: "-% 





HAND TRAP SHOOTING ON THE LAWN 



THE CLIPTON GAME and POREST SOCIETY 

The Home of the Bob-White Quail. 

We offer for immediate or 
future delivery 5,000 Ring- 
>Jeck Pheasants ; also pure 
Golden Pheasants, Silver 
Pheasants, Lady Amherts 
Pheasants, etc. Wild Tur- 
keys, Gray Wild Mallard 
Ducksj, Black Mallard 
Ducks, Ornamental Swans, 
Geese and Ducks for prop- 
agation purpo'^e. 

For particulars ivrite to 
WM. A. LUCAS, (Curator on Quail) 

87 Thomas Street, > - New York City 

Largest breeder and TUnter of 'Sob-Whites 




60 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advenisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

THE GAME BREEDER 



150 Nassau Street 



New York City 



I^lVC OAM E 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs lor sale; several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonficld, N. J. 

GET WISE-RAISE PHEASANTS FOR PASTIME. 

Profitable and fascinating Send for prices. CON- 

NECTICUr KARMS PHEASANTRY, Union, Union 

County, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

otlier animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 

WM. J MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 

antry and Game Park. 

WILD GEESE DUCKS, SWANS, ETC SEE Dis- 
play advertisement in this issue. WHEALTOX WILD 
WATER-HOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island, Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES.Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (loti 

CASH PAID FOR PEA FOWLS. State age and sex. 
Will buy soo Ring Necks, 100 Amherst. 100 Goldens, 100 
Reeves. State your best price. HELEN BARTLETT, 

Cassopolis, Michigan. 

WILD DUCKS, GEESE, PHEASANTS. PEA FOWL, 
Guineas, and Barred Rock Chickens of highest quality 
of perfection with a great show record back of them. 
OAK GROVE POULTRY YARDS, Yorkville, Illinois. 

FOR SALE.-WILD DUCKS AND GEESE. MAL- 
lards. Pintail, Snow Geese. White Fronts, Canadeis, 
for propagating and scientific purposes, at reasonable 
prices. All birds in good condition. Write GEO. J. 
KLEIN, EUin\yood, Kansas. 

PEACOCKS. ALL KINDS OF PHEASANTS, WHITE 

African Guineas, for sale, pure blooded, non-related. I 

will buy Amherst, Reeves and Pea. fowls. JOHN TAL- 

BOT, South Bend. Indiana. Q-i4-6m. 

WANTED— STAR AND SHORT STRIPE SKUNK. 
Sharp-tailed grouse For Sale— Narrow stripe skunk, 
fancy foundation stock, $5.00 pair. Wild geese and duck 
ggs in season. ENVILLA STOCK & FUR FARM, 
Cogswell, N. D. 

WE CAN FURNISH PHEASANTS, WILD DUCKS, 

rare animals, birds of all kinds Pure bred dogs. Angora 

cat.<:, monkeys, ferrets, etc Circulars free. DETROIT 

BIRD STORK. Detroit. Mich. 

FALLOW DEER, HARES. AND HUNGARIAN PAR- 
TRIDGES wanted .for March delivery: quote prices 
SAMUEL WILBUR. Englishiown. N. J. 

FOR SALE — PEACOCK, each $6.00; MAMMOTH 
Flemish Rabbit $4.00 a pair at six months. Angora 
rabbit $ ! 00 a pair. Pigeons : silvered pouters $8 00 a 
pair, white fantails $2 (10, white dragon $2 00. red homer 
$1 00. J. J. GAREAU, St. Roch I'Achigan. Quebec Can. 

PHEASANTS OF NINE VARIETIES; STOCK AMD 
eggs. Ringneckscontractable by the thousand. DAISY 
FARM, San Lorenzo, California. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price. A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 



FOR SALE-IMPORTED AUSTRALIAN PAPEBAR- 
RON geese, white India sacred doves, Australian crested 
pigeon large bronze winged doves, pearl- neck doves and 
Mandarin ducks. THE AVIARY, East Lake Park, Los 
Angeles, California. 



DOGS 



BEARHOUNDS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, BLOOD- 
HOUNDS. Fox, deer cat and lion hounds. Trained 
and young stock. 50-page illustrated catalogue 5-cent 
stamp ROOK WOOD KENNELS. Lexington, Ky 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. Al) 
trained. Shioped on trial Satisfacfion guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

CONDITIONS MAKE THIS OFFER POSSIBLE 
THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, 
Ky . . otf er for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mini and rabbit hounds, English bloodhounds, beat and 
lion hounds, also Airedale terriers. All dogs shipted on 
thirty days' trial, purchaser to judge the quality, satisfac- 
tion guaranteed or money refunded. Sixty page, highly 
illustrated, instructive and interesting catalogue for ten 
cents in stamps or coin. J0% reduction allowed on all 
orders received within thirty days. 

AIREDALES — THE GREAT ALL 'ROUnD DOG. 

Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent ; 
have puppies, grown dogs and brood matrons Send for 
large list. W. R. WATSON, Box 711, Oakland, Iowa. 



Our Wild Fowl 
and Waders 

A Practical Book on Wild Duck 
Breeding for Sport or Profit. 

Fully Illustrated $1.50 



The Game Breeder 

150 Nassau Street New York 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breoder or sign your letters: "Youri for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



61 



CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS. 

Thoroughbred stock. Bred and raised on the James 
River and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost everyday 
of the duck shooting season. Dogs and pups for sale. 
4 fine female puppies. 6 months old, at f I6.U0 each. Just 
right to break this season. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia. 

FOR SALE— MALE AND FEMALE SETTER PUP- 
PIES. 6 months old, registered stock A. K. C $25.00 
will take both. C A. KURZEL, 184 Fairview Ave.. 
Jersey City, N. J. N. Y. & N. J. Tel Conn. 



ga.mkke:e:per.s 



HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR SUPERINTEVDENT- 

wanted by experienced man as above, 20 years' first-class 
character in England and America Understand raising 
of all kinds of Game and Ducks, training and management 
of Dogs, trapping of all kinds of Vermin. B, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St . New York. 

SUPERINTENDENT.- Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 year*, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3.000 pheasants have been penned and 
20,000 r*i«ed yearly. Understand the raiding of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management ot incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit wairens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St , N. Y. City. 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 15c Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER— LIFE EXPERIENCED REARING 
land and water fowl, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs, conditioning for shows. A-l rearing pup- 
piei, well up in veterinary, competent manager of club or 
private estate. Distance immaterial J. H. W., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y City. 

GAMEKEEPER—WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January ist. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly experienced in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; 26 years' experien e. 
Can be highly recommended. R J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder. 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F. care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street. New York. 



GA.ME E.GGS 



ENGLISH PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. $3.00 
the setting of 15 eggs, or $17.50 the hundred. C. T. 
KIMB.\LL, Beloit, Wisconsin. 

BOOK YOUR ORDER NOW FOR CHINESE RING- 
neck pheasant eggs. Oregon's famous game bird. $3 00 
per dozen, S'<!0.00 per hundred. OREGON BIRD & 
PHEASANT FARM, Beaverton, Oregon. 

WILD DUCKS, GEESE. PHEASANTS, EGGS FOR 
HATCHING. The State of Massachusetts buys my 
eggs exclusively. Why don't you ? My Mallards consist 
of about one ^ovi%3SiA captured nuild birds which fly about 
my preserve, building their nests and raising their young 
as in the wild home. I also offer wood, black ducks, Can- 
adian geese and pheasant eggs. Write for information. 
JOHN HEYWOOD, Box B, Gardner, Massachusetts. 



PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE- Contracts for the 
season. Gold and Prince of Wales, $25.00. WIL> 
LITS Pheasantry, Willits, California. 



MALLARD DRAKES AND EGGS FOR SALE 

at the rate of $2.00 a setting. REDDEN QUAIL CL 
Paoli, Pennsylvania. 



Eggs 
UB, 



WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS $1.50 per dozen; safe 
delivery anywhere, full blooded (send draft), no limit, 
large orders $ro.oo hundred. C. E. BREMAN CO., 
Danville, Illinois. 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early delivery. $2 50 \ er setting 

of 15 eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthington, Minn 

FOR SALE-PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
Golden and pure Lady Amherst. One pair year old 
hybrid birds for sale. E. R. ANDERSON, So Hamilton, 
P. O., Mass. 

RINGNECK EGGS $10 PER HUNDRED Contracts 
for the season. Gold and Prince of Wales, $25.00. 
WILLITS PHEASANTRY, Willits. California. 

ENGLISH RING-NECK PHEASANTS' EGGS FOR 
HATCHING, from strong healthy slock. $3 a setting. 
$•23 a hundred. Miss HOPE PICKERING, Hope Poultry 
Farm. Rumford, R. I. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR DELIVERY IN MAY AND 
JUNE, $15 per 110; $125 per 1100. Guaranteed 1)0% fer- 
tile Packed in dry wood will keep good for a month 
ARTHUR DAVIS, The Pheasantries. Denner Hill, Great 
Wissenden, Buck. England (Associate Game Guild) 

RII^G NECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
$3.00 per setting. ERNEST WOODER, Oxford Jet , 
Iowa. 



game: BIR.D.S IVANTCD 

WANTED-IMPEYAN, ELLIOTT, SWINHOE. MAN- 
churian, fireback, peacock, Mexican Royal and other 
fancy stock pheasants ; also quails. Bob-white, grouse, wild 
doves, squirrels wof>d-duck, white peafowl and Java pea- 
fowl. F WEINBERG, East Lake Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 

I AM IN THE MARKET FOR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder. 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

WANTED— ANY OF THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES 
of pheasants. Must be in full feather and free from scaly 
leg and in good health. Swinhoe, Tragopan Satyr. Blyth 
Tragopan, Veilot FirebacK. White Crested Pheasants, 
Soemmering, Cheer Elliotts, Borneo Fireback. Pair Man- 
churian Eared that have bred in captivity. In addressing 
this office state ape. number, sex and lowest cash price. 
CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. 



PIGEONS 



BEST HOMERS AND CARNEAUX PIGEONS TIME 
and money can produce. Pictures and description free. 
Write NATIONAL SQUAB FARM, Itasca, Texas. 



MISCCI^LANEOUS 

RUFFED GROUSE WANTED, STATE PRICE. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WANTED-ACORNS. STATE PRICE PER BUSHEL. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

RANCHED RAISED MINK FOR SALE—FOXES, 
raccoons, skunks, carneaux pigeons. TARMAN'S 
FUR FARM, Quincy, Pennsylvania. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



62 



THE GAME BREEDER 



COMPLETE BOOK ON PHEASANTS, PAR- 
tridges, peafowl, quail, rabbits, deer, pigeons, poultry, 
etc , largely illustrated, colored plates 75c Colored cata- 
logue 25c, illustrating 450 varieties. Exchanges made. 
U. Pheasantry, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

BEAR CUB. HALF GROWN MALE. VERY- TAME, 
never confined, bargain. Box 327, Lexington, Kentucky. 

WANTED— COPIES OF THE GAME BREEDER FOR 
June, 1913 ; September, 1913 ; April, 1914: June, 1914; 
December, 19x4. We will pay 20 cents per copy for a 
few copies of the issues named in good condition THE 
GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 

GERMINABLE WILD RICE SEED. SHIPMENT IN 
time for Spring sowing, .shipped wet as recommended 
by Departcnent of Agriculture. Order now. ROBERT 
CAMPBELL, Keene, Ont. 

WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 

kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 

WAMTED-ACORNS. State i-rice per bushel M TAN- 
ENBAUM, 149 Broadway, New York City. 



PHEASANT EGGS 

Place your order for eggs now — from the 
Pheasantries of the well-known Blooming 
Grove Hunting and Fishing Club, Pike Co., 
Pa. We have raised thousands of pheas- 
ants yearly for the past eight years and 
carry only the best stock of hardy, strong 
flying English Ring-necked birds. Our 
eggs are carefully selected and packed. 

Price $3.00 per clutch of 15, 
or $18.00 per 100. 

BLOOMING GROVE CLUB, 220 Broadway, N. Y. 



WILD DUCK EGGS 

from strong flying birds which were 
bred wild in a marsh. Original 
stock from The Game Breeders' 
Association. 

For prices write 

Dr. HENRY HEATH, Jr., 

ORIENT, L. I., N. Y. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

Practical Book on Duck Breeding 
for Sport and Profit 

$1.50 

The Game Breeder, 159 Nassau St., N. Y. C. 




Wild Water Fowl 

Our Specialties.'' 



«i 



Wood Ducks, Mandarins Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $3.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILO WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 



Our Feathered Game - - $2.00 
Our Big Game - - - - 2.00 
The Game Breeder (for one year) 1.00 

$5.00 

Special Offer for This Month 

We will send the two books j^_ _ 
and the magazine for one year ^^ n|l 

THE GAME BREEDER 

150 Nassau Street New York, N. Y. 



More Game, and Fewer Game Laws 



In writing to advartisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



es 



MALLARD EGGS 

FOR SALE 

From Hand Raised Wild Mallards 

on Free Range, Stock 

Unsurpassed. 

$25.00 per 100, in lots of a 100 

110 to the 100 

$20.00 per 100, in lots of 500 

no to the 100 

$3.60 per setting of 15 Eggs 
A, SCOXX» Gamekeeper 

Froh-Heim Game Preserve 
FAR HILLS NEW JERSEY 




Mallard Eggs From Strong 
Flying Birds 

April Delivery 
$25.00 per hundred 

Later Deliveries 
$20.00 per hundred 

Orders booked and filled in the 
order in which they are received 

T. A. H. 

Care of 

THE GAME BREEDER 

150 Nassau St., New York 



. . THE . . 



KINGSDOWN GAME FARM 



Kent, England 



PHEASANT EGGS. Greatly reduced in price. 

All eggs guaranteed fertile. , Eggs can be supplied 
from Black-neck — Ring-neck — Half-bred Mongolian. 
Prices greatly reduced owing to the war. 

May Eggs $15.00 per 100; $125 per 1000 

June Eggs $10.00 per 100; $85 per 1000 

On prepaid orders 110 eggs to the 100. 

Customers are strongly recommended to buy 
early eggs, the extra cost will amply repay them on 
the rearing field. These eggs are despatched the 
second day after they are laid so that they will 
arrive perfectly fresh in America and are so packed 
that they cannot be broken. Pheasant poults 
reared by contract. 

We shall be pleased to send an illustrated book 
of the farm to all gentlemen and gamekeepers who 
apply, and to give any information required. 

Major WILLIAM JERYIS LOCKER, Proprietor. 

Member of the Field Sports-Game Guild. 

Address all communications to 

GERALD APTHORP, Esq. 

SITTINGBOURNE KENT, ENGLAND 



Eggs and Pheasants 
For Sale 

We are now booking orders for eggs of 
the following varieties : Pheasants, Silver, 
Golden, Ringneck, Mongolian, Reeves, Am- 
herst, Versicolor, Prince of Wales. We also 
offer for sale all of the above varieties as 
well as Impeyan, Peacock, Swinhoe and 
Manchurian Eared, also Japanese Longtails 
Blue Peafowls. 

WANTED 

Peafowl, Pheasants and Ducks 

We are also in the market for any of 
following : White Peafowl, Japanese Black- 
shouldered or Java ; in Pheasants, any of 
Tragopans, Firebacks, Cheer, Somering, 
Elliott, Kalij-Whitecrested, also Canvas- 
back ducks. In writing quote number, sex 
and lowest cash price. 

We will on receipt of 20 cents send color- 
type catalogue of pheasants and fowls, both 
land and water. 

CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or aign your letters: "Yours for More Game," 



64 THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop — a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated ducks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to, which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

'"Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially m America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

"Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly- and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finis, 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . , . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 



Pennsylvania Pheasantry and Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 





Cl^iV ^-^Tr-- 



Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental hirds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of Kneland. I have tine lot of tlie beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringnerk and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have flO a<:res 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE, a Tract of land suitable 
for a game park or preserve* 
Contains 2500 acres, two lakes, trout 
streams, part cleared, balance wood- 
land* Timber alone is worth the 
price asked for the land. 

This tract is well suited for a 
Game Breeding Association or Shoot- 
ing Club. It is located on the Dela- 
ware River, not far from Port Jervis. 

There are a number of buildings 
suitable for Club purposes* 

We have other properties adapted 
for Game Breeding Associations and 
Shooting and Fishing Preserves. 

For Particulars address 

W. G. LYNCH 

The W* G* Lynch Realty Co* 

Long Acre Building - - New York 



MAh 1)^ 1921 



^loo Per Y e ar 

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'III"""' iiiMiMiMMMiiiiimiiniiMiiiiimmTnii 

Singl e Co pi es 10 (p. 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIItTr 



QAHE 



THE- 




VOL. VII. 



' •'1, T ' 



JUNE, 1915 



The- Object op this magazine- is 

TO Make- Noeth America the 5i6gest 

iGahe Producing Countby in the World 





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F. N. MANROSS 

AND YOUNG RUFFED GROUSE WHICH HE RAISED 

From Herbert K. Job's New Book, 
"The Propagation of Wild Birds."' 



Cy. 



f||"""|||||||'|| Ill""'" ' "ii||||iN iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Miiiniiiiiiiiiiii[ 



PUSLISMED BY 

The GAME- CONSERVATION 50CIErTY; Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A r»t>4,vtj- 

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No. 3 



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-*»- 



What Rearing Food 
Do You Use? 

It is an eas}" matter to hatch Pheasant Chicks, but 
it takes knowledge and experience to rear them successfull3\ 

We cannot give you the experience but we can 
furnish 3'ou with the best Game Rearing Foods that the 

market affords, furthermore, 

if 3''Ou will follow instructions 

*i!f^j^m^a^.-^Tr'SMi»AtM as set forth in ''Pheasant 

Culture " 3'ou will not onl3'- 
be successful but 3-ou will 
find Pheasant Rearing both 
pleasurable and profitable. 




— SPR ATI'S — — 

Specially Prepared Meals 

for PoultrN' and Game have been on the market for over 
50 3^ears and a trial will convince 3'ou that there are no 
foods that can take their place. 



Send for Pheasant Culture^'''' price 25c. 
''''Poultry Culture'''' sent on receipt of 10c. 



SPRATT^S PATENT LIMITED 

Main Offices at NEWARK, N. J. 

Depots at San Francisco; St. Louis; Cleveland; Montreal. Agency at Boston, Mass. 



— • 



1 HE GAME BREEDER 



65 




|#l||lm. 




REMINGTON-UMC 

The Metallics that the Critical Sports- 
men Ask for by Name 

The dominating demand for Remington-UMC Metallics among 
sportsmen all over this country must be a stunner to those who try to 
tell you that sportsmen will take the first thing the dealer shoves 
across the counter. 

The fact that more and more sportsmen ask for Remington-UMC 
Metallics by name naturally won't mean anything to those who are 
not themselves critical about what they get. 

Nothing ever seems worth while to a man who doesn't care. 

But the fact remains that Eighty Thousand and some odd dealers 
are featuring Remington-UMC — because their eyes are open to the 
trend of the buying public. They would change in a minute if their 
sportsmen customers didn't look for the Red Ball Mark of Remington- 
UMC on every box of ammunition. 

No real merchant cares to fight the desires of his customers — he 
gets his success by concentrating on the line that the keenest sportsmen 
in his community want. 

If you are not a Remington-UMC user already, make it a point to 
get Remington-UMC next time you need metallics. 

Compare results — cartridge with cartridge and box with box and 
you will see for yourself why the great body of American Sportsmen 
and Rifle Shots swear by Remington-UMC. 

REMINGTON ARMS-UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 

Woolworth Building (233 Broadway), New York City 



J Ml l< 



III II 



uterlP 



U LONG RIFLE "/:/ 



422 lONG)\m 




GG 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Our business is 
making guns. 




For over 50 years we 
have made big guns, 
little guns, good guns — 
The "OLD RELIABLE" 
Parker Guns. 



Send for catalogue and 20 bore booklet. FREE. 

PARKER BROS., Meriden, Conn. l^V^rT^'ll 



Wire - Coops -Traps 

and other appliances for 

GAME FARMS and PRESERVES 



Strong heavy coops and fenders which will 
not blow over. 

Wire, all sizes, for Deer, Pheasants, Ducks, Quail 
and other game. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 

THE GAME BREEDER 150 Nassau Street, New York 



THE GAME BREEDER 



67 



THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is np to date and stands uneqaaled. 

NeiD Edition Just Oat. lUastrated. 
A ilain, praciicaland concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird dos subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paocr cover, $1,00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, §1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Our Feathered Game 



A HANDBOOK OF 



American Game Birds 



BY DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON. 



Illustrations — Shooting Pictures 
in color artd Portraits of all 
American Game Birds 



$2.00 




In Loaded Shells 

of practically all makes 
you can get Infallible. 
Ask for it the next time 
you buy shells. 

If you are interested in 
trapshooting write for our 
booklet called, "TRAP- 
SHOOTING." It is worth 
reading. Address 

Hercules Powder Co. 
Wilmington, Del 



mEiipuLEs^/^oy^m^^a 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 



The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Miuing. JiUiuber and Military 
Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
large gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranees 
Victor Cook DobuleOven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. lo Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. go Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves 

Ormond Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves 

Victor Gem Cook 

Laundry Stoves 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 
Victor Cook Ranges 
Loyal Victor Ranges 
Victor Hotel Ranges 
Elm Ranges 
Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

» Cauldrons 



Manufactured by 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2iid St., PKiladelpHia, Pa. 



68 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — Ohio Makes a Start — New Jersey Duck Law — 
Advice to Clubs — Trout Tags — Game Tags — Friendly Advice to Rhode 
Island — The Modern Evil of Giving — Dogs in the Adirondacks — A Bill of 
Fare — The Unnaturalized Foreign-Born— An Economic Movement — The 
Hand Trap— Praise for the Indiana Breeders' Law — New Instructions 
Concerning Naked Ducks — A Fair Price for Eggs — More Pheasants. 
Indian Rock Farm Game Preserve (Illustrated) 
The Prairie Grouse --.-... 

Three Plants for Duck Farms - - . . 

Pinioned Birds and The Game Guild . . . 
Fish Enemies— The Turtle . - . . - 

A Trip to Old Kentucky --.-.. 
Breeding Canada Geese . . _ _ _ 

My Little Bobwhites .--.._ 

Editorials— Another Game Breeding State, Connecticut — A Friendly Dif- 
ference — "Wild Game Legally Taken 
Correspondence 



D. "W. Huntington 

W. L. McAtee 

By the Editor 

Prof. L. L. Dyche 

Wm. J. Lawrence 

A. W. Whealton 

Mary C. Wilkie 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please enter my name as a contributing member of The Game 
Conservation Society and send me its publication, THE GAME 
BREEDER, for one year. $1.00 enclosed. 

Name 

Street 

City 

State 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



T^^ Game Breeder 



VOLUME VII 



JUNE, J9t5 

Co:) 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 3 



Ohio Makes a Start. 

A letter from the Ohio State Game 
Warden to The Game Conservation So- 
ciety states that a law has just been en- 
acted which permits and encourages the 
profitable breeding of pheasants. 

There was some opposition to the 
breeding of wild ducks and other game 
but if the pheasant law proves to be 
satisfactory, as it will no doubt, other 
species will be added to the list of profit- 
able foods. 

Ohio has been practically a prohibition 
State in so far as shooting is concerned. 
The prairie grouse, deer and wild tur- 
keys are extinct and the shooting of 
quails and doves is prohibited at all 
times. There is comparatively little 
duck shooting because there is not much 
land and water attractive to wild fowl. 
Many places can be made to yield wild 
ducks abundantly, when the breeding of 
these birds is permitted. The Game 
Breeders' Association proved that it is an 
easy matter to have thousands of ducks 
about a small artificial pond. 

The breeder's license fee in Ohio is 
only 50 cents. This is enough. Massa- 
chusetts charges nothing for a breeder's 
license. 

New Jersey Duck Law. 

A new law passed April 6, 1915, pro- 
vides that the open season for wild ducks 
in New Jersey shall be October 1 to 
March 15. 

Evidently the people of New Jersey 
believe the Federal law prohibiting the 
spring shooting of wild fowl is unconsti- 
tutional. Some courts have so held, one 
at least has upheld the law. 

We believe wild ducks should not be 
shot in the spring — an open season from 
September 1 to March 1 should be long 
enough. February 1, would be a better 



closing date. Game breeders are aware 
that it is wise not to shoot their ducks 
after February 1. During the month of 
February, the ducks are kept quiet and 
are fed well in order that the egg pro- 
duction may be early and profitable. 
They should sell some birds as food if 
they wish to, of course, even later than 
February, because often they have more 
drakes than are desirable for the size of 
the waters used and if they have more 
ducks than they want and the prices are 
attractive, they should let the people have 
the food. 

Advice to Clubs. 

Mr. Forbush, in the article "Game Pre- 
serving," printed in the December num- 
ber, v/ell said: 

The prejudice against game preserves arises 
largely from the fact that too many preserves 
in this country are merely lands from which 
the public is shut out, and on which the owner 
enjoys exclusive opportunity of shooting wild 
game which is, in law, the property of the 
people. In many cases the landowner does 
nothing whatever to propagate the birds or to 
increase them ; but, instead, attracts them to 
his preserve that he may shoot them. This is 
not the kind of game preserving which should 
be advocated. The public has some rights. 
The law should be so drawn that a person 
desiring to establish a game preserve should 
be required to make it a game farm. In that 
case he must secure his stock from some pri-- 
vate source — some breeder of game birds in hi* 
own or some other State — and must engage in 
propagating the birds ; then they are as much 
his own as are poultry or cattle under the same 
conditions, and there is no reason why he 
should not prohibit other people from shooting 
them on his own land, nor is there any reason 
why he should not be allowed to sell them in 
the market under proper restrictions. 

We would strongly urge all of our 
readers who belong to the thousand and 
more clubs which have not undertaken 
game breeding to get busy at once. It 
is a great advantage to own a lot of wild 



70 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ducks, quail, grouse, pheasants and other 
game, and to fix the seasons for shooting 
them.. It is fine to feel that arresting 
officers can give their entire time to pub- 
lic lands and waters, which need their 
attention, and to know that the game 
laws providing for the shooting of three 
birds in a season (or none as they provide 
in many states) do not apply to game 
farms and licensed breeders. It is a good 
plan to shoot enough so as to send some 
to market and let the dear people, who 
are said to own the game, have some 
to eat. Quickly they will cease to be 
enemies of sport. 

Trout Tags. 

As we predicted, the New York law 
has been amended so as to provide that 
the tags used for identifying the trout 
sold by breeders shall be supplied at cost, 
instead of at three cents each. This will 
reduce the price of trout in the markets, 
no doubt, because the cost of the tags is 
very small. Mr. Charles J. Vert is en- 
titled to the credit for securing this im- 
portant amendment. 



officers do not favor the arrest of food 
producers and that they are in favor of 
game breeders' enactments intended to re- 
move all doubt about the legality of an 
industry which promises to make the de- 
partments of great economic importance, 
representing all of the people, and not 
mere governmental side-shows. 

It is fair to say that the Rhode Island 
officers are not members of The Game 
Conservation Society and that they do 
not read The Game Breeder. It is not 
surprising, therefore, that they should be 
working in the old fashioned way and 
that, possibly, they still believe that the 
right way to make food abundant is to 
arrest the producer. We would suggest 
that they get in touch with the Massa-' 
chusetts, New York, New Jersey, Ver- 
mont, Colorado, California and other 
State Commissioners, who have had a 
chance to observe the operation of laws 
encouraging the profitable breeding of- 
game. It might not be a bad idea for 
them to join The Game Conservation So- 
ciety and to read its publication, The 
Game Breeder, regularly. 



Game Tags. 

Game breeders in New York and 
some other states, are required to pay 
five cents for each tag placed on a bird 
or part of a deer sold. The cost of these 
tags should not be more than the cost of 
manufacture, a small fraction of a cent 
per tag. The laws relating to tags for 
game birds undoubtedly will be amended 
so as to conform to the trout law as soon 
as the attention of the legislature is called 
to the matter. Game production should be 
encouraged and not restricted or ham- 
pered more than is necessary to satisfy 
those who believe that the breeder's game 
should be distinguished from the state 
game on public lands and water. 

Friendly Advice to Rhode Island. 

Most of the State game officers in the 
United States and some of the provincial 
officers in Canada, are members of the 
Game Conservation Society and read its 
publication, The Game Breeder. It is 
gratifying to observe that these game 



The Modern Evil of Giving. 

Urging a still further catch limit, Mr. 
J. W. Stuber of Sidney, Ohio, in Sports- 
men's Review, says where many fish are 
caught, "there is a tendency on the part 
of some to risk a violation by sale or by 
GIVING THE BASS AWAY." 

This would seem to indicate that it is 
not only an evil but a crime to give a 
fish to a friend in Ohio. How would it 
be if two fish were served at a friendly 
dinner by an angler? Would a game 
warden rush in and arrest him if he per- 
mitted his friend to eat one of the fish 
because it wis given away just as the 
warden seized a New York man who 
was about to eat a bird sent to him by a 
friend who was shooting in Scotland? 
Should the shake-down be $100 per fish, 
the amount charged for each of the 
grouse sent as a gift to the New York 
man? 

We were taught that it is more blessed 
to give than to receive, but often we are 
told that we are too old fashioned to 



THE GAME BREEDER 



71 



understand modern game laws and game 
law crimes. 

We thank the Lord that we still recog- 
nize common sense when we observe it, 
and we often think the good old dean 
of sportsmen, Charles Hallock, was right 
when he called for the present revival 
of common sense, which has worked 
wonders in some states. 

It would be an easy matter to keep 
the Ohio markets full of game fish at 
reasonable prices. 

Dogs in the Adirondacks. 

The New York law has been amended 
so as to make the provisions of section 
193 against the use of dogs applicable, 
"in the forest preserve," instead of in 
"the Adirondack Park." The prohibi- 
tion against dogs is now in force only on 
State lands within the Blue Line. 

A Bill of Fare. 

The Weekly Report published by the 
American Association of Commerce and 
Trade in Berlin, Germany, prints the 
following bill of fare and says : "In refer- 
ence to the much talked about food 
question I can safely say that this mat- 
ter does not give cause for any fear. 
Recently I lunched with friends in the 
famous restaurant of Kempinski, in Ber- 
lin. Our check was — 
1 Bottle of Wine (Berncastler).52 cents 
3 Soups . . ■. 29 cents 

1 Portion Ham 36 cents 

2 Trout 43 cents 

1 Pheasant 22 cents 

1 Goose 36 cents 

1 Fruit Ice Cream 22 cents 

3 Coffees (Mocca) 29 cents 

Total $2.69 

Since the New York Hotels have been 
purchasing pheasants at $2.50 each and 
up and they serve fractions of a bird at 
proportionate prices, 22 cents for a 
pheasant in Berlin, at this time, must 
seem reasonable to Americans. 

The Unnaturalized Foreign-born. 

The World. N. Y., says: 
By prohibiting all unnaturalized foreign-born 
persons from fishing and hunting in the State, 



the Pennsylvania Legislature comes pretty near 
making it necessary for some would-be sports- 
men to go equipped with their birth certificates, 
marriage certificates and naturalization papers, 
besides any form of license that Pennsylvania 
may require, when they want to catch a perch 
or shoot a rabbit. 

Since the unnaturalized foreign-born 
had a habit of bagging a Pennsylvania 
Game Warden occasionally it seemed 
necessary to prohibit them from taking 
the field. There was a serious objection 
made to the law, the claim being made 
that it was in violation of treaty rights, 
but the courts have upheld it. 



An Economic Movement. 

The Sportsmen's Review says : 
Many people are still of the opinion that bird 
protection is wholly sentimental. Perhaps sen- 
timent does play a great part in it as it does 
' in all important things of life, but when one 
looks further into the subject he finds that the 
movement is largely economic. The Rocke- 
feller Foundation has only recently paid $225,- 
000 for 85,000 acres in Louisiana which is to be 
used as a game refuge for migratory birds. 
There is without a doubt more than pure senti- 
ment in this, for the promoters realize what 
these birds mean to the farmer and the agri- 
culturist, and that it is necessary to keep these 
birds in order to have those who raise our 
crops succeed. , 

The property purchased by the Rockefeller 
Foundation is near Marsh Island, La., which 
was secured by 1912 by Mrs. Russell Sage for 
the same purpose. What makes it doubly 
valuable is the fact that it adjoins a 60,000-acre 
tract which its owner, Mr. E. A. Mcllhenny, 
has devoted to bird protection. When the 
Foundation carries out its intention of acquir- 
ing all the available nearby land, these bird 
refugees in Louisiana will become one great 
game preserve of 500 square miles, covering 
a frontage of seventy-five miles on the Gulf 
Coast. 

The Hand Trap. 

The du Ponts are advertising exten- 
sively the hand trap for clay bird shoot- 
ing. Since the veteran. Fanning, is about 
showing how to use this new trap the 
sportsmen will no doubt soon use it ex- 
tensively. The game clubs and preserves 
all have trap shooting and now that they 
have an abundance of game the members 
do a lot of preliminary work at the traps 
in order to be able to shoot well at the 
game. Many hand traps will be used at 
the game clubs, no doubt. 



72 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Praise for the Indiana Breeders' Law. 

The American, in a long article prais- 
ing the new game breeders' law, secured 
for Indiana by Mr. J. W. Talbot, says: 

Give private parties the right to rear quail 
as a business and the interested persons will 
protect, feed and care for them, and as a con- 
sequence they will multiply. They will be 
reared and frequently sold to clubs and indi- 
viduals who will liberate them for stocking 
purposes. Private and State hatcheries make 
possible the restocking of our fishing grounds. 
All the protective laws did not increase the 
number of fish. ' 

A man will protect his money, and if his 
money is invested in quail he will protect the 
quail. It was Buffalo Jones who saved the 
buffalo in this country, because he bought a 
few specimens and kept them for their in- 
crease. It is not always the hunter that kills 
and exterminates game. Disease, starvation 
and lack of proper care is the biggest factor in 
game destruction. In a wild state it is esti- 
mated that it required all North America to 
support two hundred thousand Indians, and it ' 
is estimated the population of this continent 
was two hundred thousand when Columbus 
discovered it. But civilization and comfort 
enable more people to live in a given territory 
than can live in the same territory in savagery. 
What is true of human beings is true of game. 

Also, the time is rapidly passing when farm- 
ers who own and cultivate the land will tolerate 
laws made solely to permit some loafer with a 
gun to tear down fences, destroy crops, shoot 
domestic animals, kill human beings and out- 
rage generosity for the purpose of calling him- 
self a sportsman and killing game that the 
farmer's land has protected and the farmer's 
grain has fed. 

New Instructions Concerning Naked 
Ducks. 

The following are the new "instruc- 
tions sent to the collectors of customs 
April 10th": 
The Collector of Customs : 

The attention of the Department has been 
called to the delay and inconvenience caused 
to passengers returning from Canada having 
wild ducks or other game birds in their pos- 
session by the requirement that they give a 
■ bond for the destruction of the plumage of 
the birds, which plumage is prohibited importa- 
tion under paragraph 347 of the tariff act. It 
is represented that in order to give the bond 
required by the Department's regulations con- 
tained in T. D. 33944, it is necessary for the 
passengers to leave the train and in many in- 
stances wait over another train, thus missing 
connections for the remainder of their trip. 

You are hereby authorized in such cases to 
permit a cash deposit to be taken by inspectors 
on the train, thus avoiding the delays com- 
plained of. Such deposit should be in an 
amount double the value of the ducks or other 



birds, but not less than $10 to be carried as a 
special deposit and refunded upon the produc- 
tion of evidence that the plumage had been 
destroyed. 

Respectfully, 

(Signed) A. J. Peters, 
Assistant Secretary. 

The U. S. Treasury officials should not 
be blamed for enforcing the .law pro- 
vided they have interpreted it properly. 
Those who secured its passage say they 
did not intend any such absurdity as has 
resulted. 

The trouble is too many laws are 
made hastily and soon they are found to 
belong in the "fool law" class. We in- 
vite the attention of Congress to this law 
and we hope it soon will be amended so 
as to permit wild fowl to come in in a 
presentable condition. We predict an 
early amendment, and when you see any- 
thing in The Game Breeder it usually 
happens, sooner or later. 



A Fair Price for Eggs. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

I would not care to sell any eggs at 
$12.00 per dozen, as I can make more 
money by raising wild turkeys. Another 
year I will keep over twenty-five extra 
hens for the purpose of having the eggs 
for sale. I will then advertise. 

H. P. B. 

Baltimore, Md. 

[We have just had a request for sev- 
eral hundred wild turkey eggs but could 
not secure them. The demand is increas- 
ing and we hope all the wild turkey 
breeders will arrange to sell eggs next 
season. It should pay to gather eggs 
at $1.00 each.— Editor] 

More Pheasants. 

A letter from the New York Game 
Commission says pheasant eggs were dis- 
tributed by the State last year to more 
than two thousand persons. Granting 
that many do not know much about 
breeding the birds there should be "more 
pheasants." 

» . - 

Members of the Game Conservation 
Society are requested to purchase from 
those who advertise. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



73 




INDIAN ROCK FARM GAME PRESERVE. 

[This is the twenty-third of a series of two hundred articles about American game farms 
and preserves. Mr. Richardson, like many other big game farmers, finds the business very 
profitable and sells all the game he can produce. Massachusetts is one of the leading "more 
game" States and the breeders are encouraged by the laws and by a capable Game Commission 
to breed all species of game for profit. — Editor.] 



In the historic Httle town of West 
Brookfield, Massachusetts, within a 
golfer's drive of the site of the famous 
Quaboag settlement blockhouse of two 
centuries gone, a Massachusetts farmer, 
master of the Bay State grange and 
chairman of the State dairy bureau, has 
established a game preserve which has 
already made him famous throughout 
the world and which now bids fair to 
bring him great wealth. 

Frotn among the herds of deer, elk, 
antelopes, wild boars and other denizens 
of the great natural forest that sweeps 
over the valleys and craggy hills in the 
rear of the picturesque Indian Rock 
farm, Carlton D. Richardson is each year 
shipping scores of Massachusetts-raised 
wild animals to every part of the globe. 

This experiment in a new kind of 
farming — the breeding of untamed ani- 
mals — has resulted in a demand for Mr. 
Richardson's wild pets in such distant 
countries as New Zealand, Denmark and 
South America, not to mention many 
zoological parks and reservations 
throughout the United States. 

The cleverness of the West Brookfield 



farmer in originating the idea of a wild 
game nursery for the purpose of profit- 
ably utilizing the natural forest reserve 
on his New England farm, and his suc- 
cess ifi carrying out his plan, has al- 
ready placed him at the head of the 
Bay State Farmers' Association, and he 
is constantly in receipt of letters from 
"grangers" throughout the country who 
own natural forest lands, and who are 
now beginning to see in them the possi- 
bilities of profitable game preserves. 

To the people of the little town of 
West Brookfield, that nestles snugly at 
the foot of Foster Hill, there is always 
a charm in discussing with visitors the 
stirring events of centuries gone that 
took place "up yonder,", and which on 
the summit of the hill have been com- 
memorated by the tablets of the Qua- 
boag Historical Society. 

But as the climax to all tales histori- 
cal, the listener is invariably informed, 
with much local pride of the beautiful 
reservation from which wild game finds 
its way all over the world. 

Standing in the silently fading shad- 
ows of the Indian Rock game reserve, 



74 



THE GAME BREEDER 



with its vistas of towering firs and hem- 
locks peopled in the sun-flecked dis- 
tance with the shadowy forms of slen- 
der-limbed deer, timid antelopes or 
stoical brown elks, each with his high- 
crowned, kingly antlers swaying as he 
swings across the light like branches in 
the wind, the visitor has but to hear the 
snapping of a twig, the creaking of a 
crooked branch above his head, to fancy 
the wild red man somewhere within 
dangerous distance, watching over this, 
his primeval home. 

For much of Mr. Richardson's success, 
as he will admit, is due to the wonder- 
fully primeval nature of his reserve. 
Once across the edge of the forest every- 
thing within becomes a part of an ani- 
mal's paradise. 

In the sequestered depths of this 15 
acres of forest there bubbles from be- 
neath a hillside a tiny spring continu- 
ally open, no matter how cold the sea- 
son, from which beaten trails threading 
away in many directions through the 
wood proclaim the spot well known to 
the wild inhabitants of the woods. 

Screened by a thicket at the base of a 
rocky cliff in the deepest part of the 
wood yawns the opening of a cave, the 
haunt of an ugly-mannered wild boar, 
whose approach is the signal for the 
scattering of even the herds of huge 
elk. 

Between the eight-foot wire fencing 
that incloses the entire reserve and the 
edge of the woods, a clearing of meadow 
land and rocky pasture threaded by a 
brook furnishes a home for the wild 
geese and different varieties of pheas- 
ants of which there are many in the 
preserve. 

The inclosed park is in the shape of a 
diamond with a cross fence through the 
centre which gives the deer a chance 
to be separate from the elk, entrance be- 
ing left of sufficient size for the deer 
to pass through at will, but not large 
enough for the elk. 

In the wet and warmer seasons both 
sides of the inclosure contain many a 
larger pool fed by tiny hillside springs 
where the elk and deer come to wallow 
during the heat of the day. 




The Deer Park. 



On one of the high rocky cliffs com- 
manding a splendid view of the sur- 
roundings through the dense growth of 
thickets the female elk retires to give 
birth to her young, the spot being one 
where she can watch for any intrusion. 

A few hours after birth the baby elk 
is hidden here in the thickets by the 
mother, who goes forth to feed, return- 
ing each night for about three weeks 
until the young one has grown large 
enough to look out for itself. 

In describing the habits of his elk and 
deer Mr. Richardson mentions the peculi- 
arity of the animals in shedding their 
antlers each season. 

The elk drop theirs in March or April, 
according to their age; the Japanese 
deer shed theirs the last of April, and the 
common deer about January 1. 

In each case a new growth begins at 
once, continuing "in the velvet" through 
the summer months until about Oct. 1, 
when the antlers begin to harden for the 
winter. 

At this season of the year the elk of the 
preserve are exceedingly dangerous and 
fierce, aggressive in the possession of 
their majestic defensive antlers, but as 
soon as their horns drop they at once 
become timid and are very hard to ap- 
proach. 

Six years ago Mr. Richardson began 



THE GAME BREEDER 15 

his experiment by purchasing a single which at no time since his first success 
pair of elks. Coupled with a natural love has Mr. Richardson's supply been equal 
for animals and a fondness for studying to the many orders that he has received 
their habits at close range was a con- for shipments of live game, 
vicition that farming of this novel sort The West Brookfield farmer also con- 
would in time add substantially to his ducts a large stock and dairy farm in 
dairy and agricultural revenues. connection with the business of wild 

He has proved most conclusively that game breeding, and is also known as one 
there is a field in Massachusetts for wild of the most active members of the Mass- 
game farming. achusetts Grange. 

Last year a shipment of 24 deer, 12 elk The 95 acres of land which the whole 

and 50 wild geese were sent by this prac- of Indian Rock farm includes is the 

tical farmer to New Zealand, where they site of earlier events of much historical 

had been contracted for by a government interest. 

agent. One pair of giant elk were sent The first Brookfield settlement was; 

to Denmark, others to South America, made on this hill in 1660. The locations, 

and several animals went to St. Louis, of the first and second meeting houses,. 

Toronto and Montreal, Can., including of the fortified blockhouse beseiged by 

buffalo and wild boars. the Indians in 1675, of the well at which 

A number of Mr. Richardson's home Major Wilson was shot during the seige, 

raised wild animals now are on exhibi- and a massive boulder known as Indian 

tion at the National Park in Washing- Rock, from behind which the savages 

ton. Seven deer, a number of elk and fired, are all upon or near the Richardson 

many pheasants have been sent by him farm lands. 

to Forest Park near Springfield. Five Over this historic land, where the game 

of the wild boars from his preserve were preserve lies, the forest remains as un- 

not long ago shipped to Ringling Bros.' broken and as thickly populated by its 

^^''^us. native denizens, the Indians excepted, as 

_ The expense of continuing the breed- it was two centuries ago. In fact, for 

ing of this class of large game, once ^ glimpse of the real New England as 

the experiment is well under way, is ^ur ancestors found the forests into 

very small. With the exception of the ^^-^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^-^^ ^^^-^ oxen, one 

small amount of hay and grain that is , i / • -^ t r id i r j 

crUrc^r, i-u^r^ A,.^: . <-u J. £ 2.1. has only to visit Indian Rock farm and 

given them during the poorest of the , -^ , . , , , , 

feeding season, the animals are able to "P^""^ ^" ^°"^ '" ^^^ ^^'"'■^ °^ ^^^ P"""' 

satisfy all their wants from the reser- ^^^^ S^^^ preserve there, 
vation itself. And the best of it all, to the owner, 

The prices that are obtained for them is that it pays, and pays wonderfully 



in 



every case show a handsome profit, well. 



THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 

By DwiGHT W. Huntington. 

No American bird, with the possible months of the year it is doomed to ex- 
exception of the wood-duck, needs the tinction." The distinguished naturalist, 
attention of American game breeders Elliot, in his book, "Game Birds of 
more than the prairie grouse. North America," says^ "along the east- 

In a text-book used in the New York ern limit of its dispersion the prairie 

schools the children read that, "although chicken is rapidly diminishing, and like 

the prairie grouse is protected for eleven the buffalo and many other wild crea- 



•76 



THE GAME BREEDER 



tures that once roamed in countless num- 
bers over certain portions of our land, 
will doubtless soon entirely disappear." 

Considering the game laws which pre- 
vent any one from looking .after these 
birds properly and profitably, Elliot, no 
doubt was right in predicting their early 
extermination. No good reason can be 
assigned, however, why the birds should 
be "protected off the face of the earth." 
Audubon described the birds as a pest 
in Kentucky, but they no longer are a 
pest in that State or in Ohio or in other 
States where they have been extermin- 
ated. In Iowa and some other States 
the game departments are endeavoring 
to replace the prairie grouse with gray 
partridges imported from Hungary and 
other countries and they seem to be bliss- 
fully ignorant that the birds they are 
importing are abundant in foreign coun- 
tries because they are properly looked 
after and that they will stand no better 
chance and, in fact, not so good a chance 
for their existence as the prairie grouse 
did provided they receive no better pro- 
tection than the grouse. 

The sportsmen in States like Ken- 
tucky, Ohio and some others where the 
grouse once were plentiful but where 
they now are extinct certainly cannot ob- 
ject to their introduction and profitable 
increase by game breeders. There is an 
abundance of land suitable for grouse 
breeding and no good reason can be as- 
signed why they should not be made 
plentiful in a very short space of time 
provided the land owners can be made 
to understand that the grouse are desir- 
able and that they can be produced prof- 
itably both for sport and for food. 

Fortunately the laws in some States 
do not prohibit the necessary industry 
because the birds are not protected for 
the very good reason that they do not 
exist. The opportunity for grouse 
breeding for sport and for profit is, 
therefore, excellent and the only diffi- 
culty in the way of making the birds 
profitably abundant lies in the fact that 
it is almost impossible to get stock birds 
or eggs with which to start the much- 
needed industry. It is fortunate that 
some States where the grouse occur re- 



cently have enacted game breeders' laws 

permitting the profitable breeding of all 
species of grouse and we hope soon to 
advise our readers where they can pro- 
cure birds and eggs for propagation. 
When an Indiana or an Oklahoma 
farmer realizes that he can get a good 
price for grouse and that he can have 
all he wishes to eat there will be some- 
thing doing unless we are much mis- 
taken. The grouse are worth at least 
$5 per bird. The eggs are worth from 
$6 to $10 per dozen. A start can be 
made with a very few birds or eggs and 
since the ratio of increase is geometrical 
the profits from the grouse industry will 
be even larger than the profits from 
pheasant breeding. 

The grouse can be bred wild in the 
fields and at a much less expense than 
is required for the hand rearing of 
pheasants. Quail can be reared success- 
fully on the same ground, and if there 
be any water suitable for ducks enough 
wild ducks can be reared to pay the en- 
tire expense of running a grouse and 
quail ranch. 

We expect to see this industry started 
in Indiana, Oklahoma and other States, 
where the industry of grouse breeding 
no longer is criminal, and we hope to 
assist the grouse breeders by putting 
them in touch with those who have 
grouse and eggs to sell. 

We know one place where a few 
grouse were introduced and where to- 
day there are thousands of birds in no 
danger of extinction. The absurd game 
laws prohibited the owners from selling 
stock birds or eggs but we believe this 
nonsense is passing rapidly and there 
will be no arrests made if the owners of 
the birds sell some of them and some 
eggs to those who will undertake their 
propagation. 

Grouse are worth $5 per bird as food 
in the markets. They can be produced 
in Kentucky, Ohio and many other 
States much cheaper than poultry. Since 
they will procure much of their food in 
the fields and they can be kept plentiful 
by supplying a very small amount of 
grain during the winter. 

We are especially interested in making 



THE GAME BREEDER 



77 



these birds plentiful and cheap in the 
markets since we know the sportsmen 
will enjoy shooting them and the people 
will enjoy eating them. Let us stop 
saying the birds are "doomed to extinc- 
tion" and lend a hand to making them 
profitably plentiful even in the States 
where they are extinct. 

This is the first of a series of articles 
about the prairie grouse. It will be fol- 



lowed by articles describing the food 
habits of the birds and the best methods 
of introducing them and propagating 
them abundantly. 

Readers who can furnish any grouse 
or eggs are requested to write to our 
supply department. We wish to procure 
as many birds and eggs as possible. Our 
advertisers will pay excellent prices fof 
any number of birds or eggs. 



THREE PLANTS FOR DUCK FARMS. 

By W. L. McAtee, 
Assistant Biologist U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

[This article is from an important bulletin, "Eleven Important Wild Duck Foods," by the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. The Bureau of Biological Survey which contributes the bul- 
letins about the game foods, performs an important and valuable service. This bulletin about 
duck foods should be followed by another describing the methods of breeding wild ducks for 
food and the profits which are made by wild duck breeders in the many States which now 
permit such industry. The Department should call attention also to the fact that the New York 
markets are closed to the breeders of other States and should suggest that the opening of this 
market soon would result in an abundance of game. Mr. Clyde B. Terrell, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, 
is the principal dealer in the plants eaten by wild fowl. His advertisement appears regularly in 
The Game Breeder. — Editor.] 



The plants considered under this head 
are distinguished by rankness of vege- 
tative growth, comparative unimportance 
of their seeds as duck food, and lack of 
fleshy rootstocks and tubers. These 
qualities render the plants generally un- 
desirable for propagation as wild-duck 
foods, but they are the very things which 
make them valuable for duck farms. As 
a rule abundant green food is available 
to wild ducks, but the birds usually have 
to search for seeds, fruits, tubers, and 
like forms of concentrated nutriment. 
The conditions on a game farm are just 
the reverse. The birds are supplied 
grain food constantly, but need rough- 
age, particularly of naturally suitable 
kinds. Plants of rapid, luxuriant growth 
are necessary and all requirements are 
fulfilled by water-cress, water-weed and 
coontail. 

The three plants just mentioned are 
not recommended for planting in waters 
where any other growth is desired, since 
they are such rank growers that they 
are apt to take complete possession. 
One of them namely, coontail, has con- 



siderable value as a wild-duck food, 
however, and may be tried in waters 
where other plants have failed. 

On duck farms best results will be 
obtained if the unit system of ponds be 
adopted. Ducks can be turned into one 
pond at a time, and when a pond is eaten 
out it may be resown, screened off and 
allowed to make a new crop. Under 
favorable conditions water-weed and 
coontail will grow 6 inches a day. 

Water- Cress. 

Knowledge of the importance of 
water-cress as a duck food is derived en- 
tirely from breeders of wild ducks, who 
almost without exception consider it a 
valuable plant for a duck farm. Not 
only is it relished, but it is said to grow 
so fast in some places that the ducks 
cannot eat it out. 

Water-cress (Sisymbrium nasturtium- 
aquaticum) either floats in the water, 
rooted only at the lower end, or creeps 
along on mud or in shallow water, 
throwing out roots at every joint. It 
is a smooth, fleshy plant, with divided 



78 



THE GAME BREEDER 



-leaves and small white flowers (Fig. 
18). The leaves consist of 3 to 9 sym- 
metrically arranged oval or roundish 
segments, of which the apical of each 
leaf is the largest. The pods vary from 
one-half to one and one- fourth inches in 
length, are slightly curved, and contain 
numerous small seeds. There is a con- 
stant succession of flowers and pods 
throughout the growing season. The 
plant sometimes is strongly tinged with 
olive-brown, suggesting one of its com- 
mon names, brown-cress. Other names 
^re well-cress or -grass, water-kers, 
-kars, -karse, or -grass, crashes and 
brook-lime. 

Water-cress occurs practically through- 
out the United States. 

Water-cress usually is propagated by 
seed. This may be obtained from most 
seedsmen. The plant is also easily 
transplanted by cuttings. It grows in 
springs, brooks, small streams and shal- 
low ponds. Waters in which it is found 
are usually cool and have some current. 
It may be sown in similar situations at 
any time during spring or summer. 

Water- Weed. 

Evidence for the value of water-weed 
is of the same nature as for water-cress. 
The density and luxuriance of its growth 
are such that water-weed maintains its 
stand even when fed upon daily by a 
large number of ducks. Small quanti- 
ties of the plant have been found in 
stomachs of the mallard, blue-winged 
teal and goldeneye. 

Water- weeds (Figs. 19 and 20) have 
long, branching stems with luxtiriant 
foliage and are of a beautiful translucent 
green color. The leaves which are set 
upon the stem in whorls of from 2 to 4 
(usually 3), vary from ovate to strap- 
shaped, and may be pointed or obtuse, 
and are sometimes finely toothed. They 
are from one-fourth to one inch or more 
in length and from one-twelfth to one- 
eighth of an inch in width. The small 
flowers are borne on rather long stalks 
and open at the surface of the water. 
The fruit, which is rare, is few seeded 
and ripens under water. 

This plant was introduced into Great 




Fig. i8 — Water-cress. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



79 



Britain in the middle of the nineteenth 
century, and spread rapidly, making such 
rank growth that it soon became a pest, 




Fa. ig — Water-Weed. A Compact Form. 

filling ornamental waters, mill races and 
canals. It became known there as Amer- 
ican water-weed and Babington's curse 
(because introduced by a botanist of that 
name). Other names applied to the 
plant are ditch-nioss, water-thyme, 
thyme-weed, cats-tails, and choke pond- 
weed. 

Some botanists consider that there are 
several different species of water-weed 
in the United States. But, having in 
mind the entirely different aspect wild 
plants of water-weed assume when 
transferred to an aquarium, one is in- 
clined to think that differences in the 
forms, which have been thought to rep- 
resent distinct species, may be largely 
due to conditions under which the plants 
were grown. 

Water-weed has had various scien- 
tific names applied to it, and the follow- 
ing may be encountered in trade cata- 
logues: Philotria, Elodea, and Anacha- 
ris. The specific name that has been 
most commonly used in this country is 
canadensis. Dealers in aquarium plants 
usually list a form of water-weed known 
as Anacharis canadensis gigantea. 



Water-weeds grow naturally through- 
out most of North America. 

Water-weed propagates itself from 
pieces of leafy stem or root. It is tena- 
cious of life, and if shipment in good 
condition is achieved, no trouble will be 
experienced in obtaining a stand of the 
plant. Bury the roots or bases of stems 
in the bottom in shallow water for quick 
results. The plant will grow, however, 
if only thrown in water shallow enough 
(3 feet or less) to allow it to send 
roots to the bottom. It likes a loam or 




Fig. 20^ Water-Weed A Dffuse Form. 

sandy loam and does not grow in clay; 
Either still or running waters are suit- 
able. When established it will spread to 
water up to 10 feet in depth. 

COONTAIL. 

The seeds of coontail are eaten by 
practically all wild ducks, but the foliage 
by a much smaller number and less fre- 
quently. Ducks known to feed on this 
plant are the following: Hooded mer- 
ganser, mallard, black duck, Florida 
duck, gadwell, wigeon, green-winged and 
blue-winged teals, spoonbill, pintail, 
wood duck, redhead, canvasback, little 
and big bluebills, ringneck, goldeneye, 
bufile-head, old squaw, white-winged 
scoter, ruddy duck and the whistling 
swan. 

The following instances show the local 
value of coontail to some of these species 
of ducks : 

About 30 per cent, of the food of 171 
mallards collected about Mansura and 



80 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Fig 21 — Coontail. A Compact Form. 

Marksville, La., from October to De- 
cember consisted of coontail, and as 
many as 150 seeds were found in a 
single stomach. Much more than the 
ordinary proportion of stems and leaves 
of the plant were taken by these birds. 

Another illustration of foliage eating 
is furnished by eight mallards and one 
black duck collected at Big Lake, 
Arkansas, in December, 1912. More 
than 85 per cent, of the food of the 
mallards was made up of the foliage of 
coontail, with a few seeds, while 90 per 
cent, of the black duck's food consisted 
exclusively of coontail foliage. 

Sixty-four mallards collected at Me- 
nesha. Ark., in November and December, 
1909, had fed on coontail seeds to the 
extent of 7.23 per cent, of their diet. 
Fourteen of the same species of duck, 
taken at Lake Wapanoca, Arkansas, in 




November, 1910, had eaten enough 
seeds, with a little foliage of coontail, to 
form on an average more than half of 
their food. 

The plant thus has considerable local 
value as a wild-duck food. However, 
its tendency to crowd out more desirable 
species makes transplanting unwise, un- 
less in particularly difficult cases where 
other plants have failed. The very 




Fig-. 23— Seeds and Fruit of Coontail. 



Fig. 22 — Coontail, A Diffuse Form. 

qualities of coontail that make it a nui- 
sance in natural waters commend it to 
duck farmers. 

The stems of coontail {Ceratophyllum 
demersum) are thickly clothed with 
round, dense masses of foliage (Figs. 21 
and 22), which in shape amply justify 
the common name so widely used in the 
South, and which is here adopted for the 
plant. Coontail is a submerged plant, 
but only exceptionally is it attached to 



THE GAME BREEDER 



81 



the bottom, as it has no roots ; it usually 
grows in rather quiet waters from 2 to 
10 feet deep. The leaves are composed 
of slender but rather stiff filaments, 
twice or thrice forked, and sparingly 
furnished with small acute projections. 
They grow in whorls of from 5 to 12, 
and are usually much crowded on the 
upper part of the stem. 

The fruit of coontail (Fig. 23) is 
composed of a rather large, flattened 
seed, wedge-shaped at one end and 
rounded at the other, inclosed in a thin 
covering which bears various tubercles 
on the surface and spines on the margin. 
A common form has one spine at the 
apex and one at each basal angle of the 
fruit. One may examine many plants 
without finding fruit; nevertheless, the 



frequency with which ducks find it 
proves that a good crop is produced. 
Coontail is known also as hornwort, 
horn-weed, morass-weed, coontail moss, 
fish-blankets and June grass. 

Coontail is practically cosmopolitan 
and occurs throughout all but the ex- 
treme northern parts of North America. 

Pieces of coontail broken off from the 
parent plant promptly make new colo- 
nies, a characteristic which makes trans- 
planting easy. Care need be taken only 
to see that the plants do not lose their 
vitality either through drying or fermen- 
tation during shipment. 

Plant in quiet water. As the plant has 
no roots, it is enabled to thrive over 
hard and sandy bottoms where many 
other plants cannot establish themselves. 



PINIONED BIRDS AND THE GAME GUILD. 



It is advisable in ordering live birds to 
state that pinioned birds are not wanted 
if such be the case. Otherwise there 
may be trouble. 

One of our advertisers in filling an 
order for pheasants sent pinioned birds. 
Since the purchaser wished to liberate 
the birds on a club ground, for shooting, 
he was much dissatisfied and the adver- 
tiser suggested that the matter of dam- 
ages be arbitrated by the editor of The 
Game Breeder, and agreed to abide by 
the result. 

We had a similar case recently when 
pinioned wild ducks were shipped and 
the club wished to have birds which 
could fly. The claim in both cases was 
made that since the birds were ordered 
early in the year the presumption was 
that they were desired for vbreeding pur- 
poses. 

The editor of The Game Breeder does 
not arbitrate controversies between ad- 
vertisers and their customers for evident 
reasons. Where one or both of the par- 
ties are subscribing or contributing mem- 
bers of the Game Conservation Society 
and both wish to have their controversy 
arbitrated the matter is referred to The 



Game Guild, which is a committee of the 
Game Conservation Society, formed to 
pass on numerous matters of interest to 
the members of the Society. If the 
Guild, for example, orders that the ad- 
vertisement of an undesirable or dishon- 
est dealer be not accepted it will not ap- 
pear in the magazine. Any one who has 
a complaint to make about unfair deal- 
ing can make it to the magazine and the 
matter will be promptly referred to the 
Guild for investigation. The decision of 
the Guild may be reviewed by the editors 
and the directors of the Game Conser- 
vation Society, provided either party is 
not satisfied with the award or decision. 
The managers of the magazine wish to 
have reliable advertisers only; and no 
unfair dealing will be tolerated. Since 
the Game Conservation Society has been 
formed to do good work in the way of 
encouraging game breeding and it is sup- 
ported by its members who are widely 
distributed in all of the United States 
and in the Provinces of Canada, it is 
highly important that the members of 
the Association should" be safeguarded 
against wrong practices and we rely on 
our readers to make complaints when 



82 



THE GAME BREEDER 



they should be made. We assure them 
they will be protected. 

Not long ago we had a serious com- 
plaint from a member of the Society 
who said he had sent a cheque in pay- 
ment for birds, but never received the 
birds. The matter was investigated and 
the advertisement was ordered out pend- 
ing the investigation; but, later, it ap- 
peared that the error was excusable ; the 
member wrote to say he had received 
his birds and they were fine ones — he 
was well pleased with them. 



We suggested that our members en- 
deavor to learn the cause of any delay 
or apparent unfair treatment before 
complaining to The Game Breeder, but 
if they are not satisfied with the result 
of their inquiries and will send us the 
correspondence the matter will be placed 
before the Guild promptly and passed 
on. There is no charge for this service. 

The Game Conservation Society is 
now the largest association of game 
breeders in the world and our aim is to 
keep its standard high. 




TURTLS TRAP. 

This picture of" a turtle trap, published in the May issue, attracted much attention, and it is 
repeated with the additional working drawings at the request of a reader. The photograph 
shows the trap in its natural position. Three turtles are on the boards that serve as roadways 
to the drop board. One turtle being dumped into trap from the drop or trap board. 

FISH ENEMIES— THE TURTLE. 

By Prof. L. L. Dyche, 
Late Game and Fish Warden of Kansas. 

[The picture of a turtle trap was sent by Professor Dyche a short time before his untimely 
death. At the same time he sent the working drawings of the trap which are published in this 
issue. Turtles are enemies of wild ducks also. At the Game Breeders' Association we ran a fence 
of small mesh chicken wire a few feet from the shore of the breeding pond thus giving the 
ducks access to a narrow strip of shallow and comparatively warm water. Many turtles which 
were observed trying to find an opening in the wire, were shot bv the game keepers from the 
shore and from a boat. — Editor.] 



One of the chief natural enemies, out- 
side of the fish themselves, here at the 
State Fish Hatchery, is the turtle. There 
are different kinds of turtles, and outside 
of a few that seem to feed for the most 
part upon vegetable matter, we find that 
most of them are not averse to eating 



fish. The snapping turtle is the worstJ 
and on the Hatchery grounds destroya 
more fish than all the others combined/ 
An examination of the stomachs 
snapping turtles taken from the Hatch] 
ery ponds has shown that they are greed] 
feeders, and that in many instances 



THE GAME BREEDER 



83 







^.rC-Z.'"" 



^e.citott ait CO 



'f5 



^ 



'^, 






^.>^/ 



-/-r4- 




/='ia^ 



■Ste. oit T.I3. 



TURTLE TRAP. 



Fig. 1 shows side of the box trap, which is 4 feet long, 2 feet high and 2 feet wide. It is 
Tauilt by stapling 5^, ^ or 1 inch wire screening on a framework built of boards from 4 to 6 
inches in width and 1 inch thick. 

Fig. 2 shows cross section of the box trap, and shows the 6-inch strip of tin or galvanized 
iron that has been tacked on the inside of the top of the trap and bent down. It prevents the 
turtles from crawling out of the trap. 

Fig. 3 shows top of trap with arrangement of the 6-inch boards that drop as soon as the 
turtles crawl upon them and allow the animals to fall into the trap. 

Fig. 4 shows these drop boards with weights near the end. The turtles crawl upon these 
drop boards, using the inclined boards that extend into the water as roadways. At the State 
Hatchery over fifty turtles have been taken from a single trap in a week's time. 



large portion of their food is made up of 
fish. 

Snapping turtles secrete themselves 
among the aquatic plants and apparently 
watch for fish that are passing by. They 
catch the fish by a quick stroke of the 
head, which their long necks allow them 
to throw out several inches from the 
body. We never had an opportunity of 
observing this operation until last year, 
when we saw a snapping turtle catch a 
Bullhead catfish. The fish was taken in 
the turtles mouth and without chewing 
or particular biting, was swallowed head 
first. A few minutes later we shot and 
secured the turtle, which was one that 
would weigh about twelve pounds. 
Dissection showed that the catfish that 
had been swallowed was lacerated in a 
few places by the sharp beak of the 



turtle, but was not cut up or pulled to 
pieces. In the stomach of this same 
turtle we found two sunfish, a half 
grown bull-frog and a crayfish, in addi- 
tion to the Bullhead catfish mentioned 
above. Altogether, a rather large 
amount of food — about a pound — for an 
animal that weighed only twelve pounds. 
We get rid of the turtles by shooting 
them and by means of a wire screen box 
trap shown in the illustration. We also 
use steel traps set near the edge of the 
water and baited with a piece of fish for 
the capture of snapping turtles. The fish 
or part of a fish used for bait may be 
fastened near the shore and just under 
the water by running an iron rod or 
sharp stick through it and down into 
the ground to hold it in place. The 
chain of the trap should be fastened to 



84 



THE GAME BREEDER 



a wire, stake, or something that will hold turtles as these animals do not climb inta 
it. Steel traps are used for the snapping the box traps as readily as other varities. 



A TRIP TO OLD KENTUCKY. 

By Wm. J. Laurence. 



Mr. Stanley Blake, very favorably 
known as a sportsman throughout this 
and many foreign lands, very kindly 
tendered me a special invitation to visit 
the Blue Grass Farm Kennels, of Berry, 
Ky., of which he is manager. The spe- 
cial invitation came to me by reason of 
the fact that a warm friendship had 
sprung up between us because of my 
having purchased several dogs from him 
which gave perfect and complete satis- 
faction. Having always had a very 
earnest desire to visit the southland 
and especially far-famed Kentucky, I 
promptly accepted the invitation of Mr. 
Blake and within a few days thereafter 
arrived in the beautiful and attractive 
little village of Berry. Upon my arrival 
at the station I was met and greeted by 
Mr. Blake, himself, who conducted me 
through the town and out to his farm, 
where I was hospitably received by the 
other members of his family, his office 
force, the overseer of the farm, kennel 
attendants, etc. Magnificent quarters 
were placed at my disposal and I was 
made to feel comfortable and perfectly 
"at home." Boys, Kentucky hospitality 
is no myth, as Mr. Blake and his friends 
certainly entertained me like a prince 
while there. The friendship that ex- 
isted between us through our corre- 
spondence gained volume when I met 
and talked with Mr. Blake. He is a 
man of fine intellectual powers and bril- 
liant personality. 

Very briefly I shall endeavor to de- 
scribe the quality of the dogs, the ken- 
nels and the surrounding country. Too 
much cannot be said of the dogs and 
their superb quality. But it is only nat- 
ural that dogs of extraordinary quality 
should be raised with such environments 
as these dogs have. Being farm-raised 
they are naturally sturdy and hardy 



physically and being of thoroughbred 
stock is another decided advantage they 
possess over the dogs of many other 
kennels of more or less mixed blood 
lines. Early in life they are vaccinated 
and made immune from distemper and 
other contagious diseases. Disease is 
practically unknown at the Blue Grass 
Farm Kennels; Mr. Blake tells me, only 
one real bad case of distemper having 
developed since the first of the year. 
The kennels are daily sterilized, fresh 
beds of straw placed in them, the ken- 
nels themselves being frequently white- 
washed as a preventive to germs getting 
a foot-hold on the premises and every 
precaution known to medical science and 
that years of experience . has developed 
is used to keep down disease. Complete 
success has attended Mr. Blake's efforts 
along this line. 

The kennels are located on a beauti- 
ful blue grass farm comprising eighty- 
odd acres, every rod of which is mod- 
ernly equipped and improved. The main 
kennel is located on the southern side 
of a hill, protecting the dogs from the 
cold and severe blasts of winter winds 
and affording them the warm balmy air 
that comes from the south. The ken- 
nels are so located on the slopes of the 
hill that the sun can shine directly into 
them even in winter when "old glory" 
rises in the extreme southeast and sets 
in the extreme southwest. It is a well 
known fact that the rays of the sun are 
most deadly to the germs of disease. 
The kennels are supported by concrete 
foundations, which prevent their over- 
flow in rainy weather. Setters, pointers, 
fox and cathounds, bear and lionhounds, 
coonhounds, bloodhounds, etc., too nu- 
merous to mention, all have separate 
apartments. Females and males are also 
kept separate. These dogs are farm- 



THE GAME BREEDER 86 

raised, as previously mentioned, and Dogs are shipped from there to every 
only the best are bred to the best, thus State in the Union, Canada, Mexico, 
with each succeeding litter they grow South America, Central America, Phil- 
better and better. In fact I believe they ippine Islands, Cuba, and in fact to 
have well nigh reached the height of nearly almost every foreign country 
perfection. It is impossible for me to see where game is found. The kennel will 
in what way they can be improved upon, accommodate many hundreds of dogs 
The farm itself contains thousands of as before mentioned. The average num- 
feet of timber, making an ideal retreat ber on hand ranges from 250 to 400. 
for game of all kinds, which abounds in The surrounding country is beautiful 
plenty. Coon, especially inhabit this ter- indeed and Mr. Blake could not, in my 
ritory, as a river forms the southern and estimation, have selected a better suited 
western boundary of Mr. Blake's do- place for the raising and training of 
main. Mr. Blake tells me that his dogs thoroughbred dogs than here. The ken- 
are raised and trained by twenty-seven nels alone are well worth seeing and 
trainers and raisers the most expert to ^^j-th the price of the trip, aside from 
be found He employs two handlers to ^^^ beautiful scenery en route. Berry is 
watch after the dogs at the mam ken- ^ , j ^u r^ I. i r\- • • £\u 

^ -ru cc £ • £ situated on the Kentucky Division of the 

nels. i he othce force comprises some of t o -nt -n -n ^£^ r -i ^t. £ 

the most skilled men that could be pos- ^: ^. ^^ ^•^•'. ^fty-four miles south of 

sibly found. It is the duty of these men Cincinnati, Ohio. I am sure that anyone 

to handle the enormous correspondence wishing a square deal m purchasing dogs 

incident to this business, which is no will find Mr. Blake and the Blue Grass 

small task, as I personally can assert. Farm Kennels on the square. 



BREEDING CANADA GEESE. 

By A. W. Whealton. 

In breeding Canada wild geese the them. When the goslings are hatched 

whole trick is to get a pair to lay one out I leave them entirely in the care of 

season and after that they will continue the parents, feeding them moistened 

to breed every year provided they are coarse yellow corn meal, although where 

given a proper chance to nest and be there is plenty of fresh green grass they 

free from all disturbances during the often ignore this food and subsist en-^ 

breeding season. tirely on the grass. After a few weeks, 

We have small mounds, flat-topped, I feed cracked corn, then whole grain 
thrown up in the center or just at the corn. It should be understood that this 
margin of our ponds. Around the tops ration is supplemented by the grass they 
•of these, rushes are stuck to afford forage for themselves, otherwise I 
shelter and privacy for the nests; straw should be forced to supply green foods, 
or pine-needles are put in some place as well as a variety of mixed grain, 
easily accessible, or in the nests them- As soon as the goslings are hatched 
selves, and the geese will arrange the out, the parents and their brood are re- 
nests as they like. My pairs have been moved to another compartment to pre- 
keeping the same nests for many years, vent their fighting other pairs of Canadas 
some of the oldest pairs, from forty to and while doing so neglecting ^ their 
fifty years. young or having the latter hurt in the 

Canadas lay from five to seven eggs frequent melees, 
and usually hatch all of them. I let the Canadas begin mating at three and 
geese hatch out their own eggs and 
avoid going near the nests or disturbing {Continued on page po.) 



86 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^f Game Breeder 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, JUNE, 1915 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, jFi 25. 



The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 

PUBLISHERS, 150 NASSAU ST., Nkw YORK 
Telephone, Beekman 36f>5. 



ANOTHER GAME BREEDING 
STATE. 

Three cheers for Connecticut ! 

Just as we go to press the news comes 
that the Connecticut legislature has en- 
acted a game breeders' bill permitting 
the breeding and sale of deer, pheasants 
and wild fowl. This has been signed by 
the Governor and is now a law. 

As is usual in first attempts, an impor- 
tant subject is approached wrong end 
first. The law should have permitted the 
profitable breeding of all species of 
game. It is absurd to permit the saving 
of pheasants, which are in no danger of 
extinction, and to deny the care and at- 
tention of breeders to the indigenous up- 
land game which most needs practical 
protection. 

It is a distinct gain, however, to say, 
"wild fowl," and to not limit the indus- 
try to the common wild ducks, "mallards 
and black duck^," as some statutes do. 
These birds are in no danger of extinc- 
tion as the wood-duck and some other 
wild fowl are. 

We can promise the Connecticut 
breeders that the New York market will 
quickly be opened to the foods they pro- 
duce. The Game Conservation Society, 
The National Association of Audubon 
Societies and other associations whose 
co-operation is assured will soon see that 
a common sense law is enacted permit- 
ting the sale in New York of the wild 



foods produced by industry in other 
States. 

It is absolutely safe to purchase cheap 
lands in Connecticut to be used for game 
breeding. Some sales will be made to 
people who take our advice. There can 
be no doubt about the matter. The New 
York market soon will be open to the 
foods produced. 

Lands can be purchased at $2.00 per 
acre and up. Pheasants sell readily at 
$2.50 each; wild ducks sell at $1.50 and 
$2.00 each for common species; others 
bring $10.00 per pair and more. The 
new industry is profitable. 



A FRIENDLY DIFFERENCE. 

We take pleasure in printing the let- 
ter of Mr. John W. Talbot of Indiana. 
Mr. Talbot has done something in his 
State which we believe it would be im- 
possible to do in many States at the 
present time. Our admiration for what 
he has done is unbounded. We certainly 
had no intention of belittling or criticiz- 
ing the Indiana law which places game 
breeding on the same basis as the breed- 
ing of poultry. This undoubtedly is 
right on private lands. 

We said we preferred a breeders' law 
which licensed the industry and we do, 
for the present at least: 

First — Because we believe it is pos- 
sible to get such an enactment in States 
where it would be impossible to go the 
limit as Mr. Talbot has done. We are 
willing to back a compromise measure in 
localities where we are sure the opposi- 
tion is strong enough to insist on such 
compromise. 

Second — Because there is a difference 
between game and poultry. There is, 
and we hope there always will be con- 
siderable wild game, which is said to be- 
long to the State because it has no 
owner — such as the game in public parks 
on wild and unposted lands and on pub- 
lic marshes and waters. The people who 
are interested in this game firmly be- 
lieve, and experience has proved they 
have reason to believe, that if the game 
produced by breeders is sold legally it 



THE GAME BREEDER 



87 



may result in the sale of some of the 
so-called State game against the sale of 
which in some States there is a decided 
prejudice. 

Third — Because, for the present at 
least, we believe the identification of the 
game produced by industry. before it is 
sold, will be a benefit and not a burden 
to the breeders, provided no license or 
merely a nominal one be charged and 
provided the rules and rates applied to 
the identification be reasonable and 
small. Game is so valuable that there 
is a great temptation to steal it and sell 
it and this temptation will remain great 
until game becomes plentiful when the 
theft of game will be no more important 
than the theft of poultry now is. We 
should remember, also, that the best 
game is bred in the fields and woods, as 
it should be in the most sanitary man- 
ner; this is more easily stolen than 
poultry is. There is much poaching in 
England, although the incentive is small, 
because game is cheaper, often, than 
poultry. Many breeders while the 
prices for this desirable food are tre- 
mendously high will agree with us that 
it is desirable to have the food produced 
by industry, safeguarded against theft 
and the customers should be willing to 
pay a fraction of a cent per bird which 
is -all the identification tags should cost. 
They should be furnished by the State 
to reputable breeders in large lots. 

Mr. Talbot seems to have misunder- 
stood what we said about our, "doubt 
if the Indiana law will result in much 
wild game being sold." We did not wish 
to convey the idea that we did not be- 
lieve much game would be produced and 
sold: we wished to express the opinion 
that in Indiana we did not believe the 
sale of game produced by industry would 
result in much of the wild or "State 
game" being marketed. The temptation 
to sell game illegally is not so great in 
Indiana as it is in some States. On an- 
other page we predicted that Indiana un- 
doubtedly would produce abundantly. 
We hope and believe it will; and if it 
does Mr. Talbot's excellent law un- 
doubtedly will remain in the books, as 
it should. 



We are not only in favor of the In- 
diana law but we are enthusiastic about 
it. We not only admire Mr. Talbot's 
work but we are enthusiastic about it. 
Mr. Talbot has performed a great serv- 
ice for his State and a great service for 
America. If the Indiana law works out 
well, it undoubtedly will be copied in 
other States and we will support the idea 
wherever it appears. The reasons why 
we favor, for the present, the regula- 
tion of the new industry have been 
stated. We hope the people of Indiana 
will appreciate fully what Mr. Talbot 
has done ; if they will nominate him for 
Governor we will stump the State for 
him. We don't know what his politics 
are. We are for him. 

Wild Game Legally Taken. 

Mr. Talbot will agree with us no 
doubt that wild game (birds or mam- 
mals) legally taken in the chase belongs 
to the taker; that it is and should be 
his personal property. It becomes his 
because of his industry ; because he has 
pursued it and reduced it to his posses- 
sion. AU that is or should be required 
is that the game be legally taken during 
the open season. 

This was the Roman law from which 
many of the good laws of England and 
America were copied. It is nothing more 
than common sense to say that a game 
bird legally taken and in the pocket of 
the gunner is his. This being so he 
should sell it, if he wishes to do so, in 
order that some one of the people, who 
are said to own the game, may have a 
taste of it. ^ ■ 

In England and other civilized coun- 
tries the wild fowler or market gunner 
not only sells the wild game he may 
shoot but he is permitted to trap it for 
the market. He procures food for the 
people to eat just as the cod-fishermen 
go to the public waters in America and 
procure public fish for the people to eat. 
We have said that the market gunner 
has a better excuse for his existence 
than a sportsman who. claims that he 
only kills birds for fun. We have visited 
and shot with good and entertaining 
market gunners and we hope to live to 



88 THE GAME BREEDER 

see the day when they can have the same believe this plan in many States will 

freedom in America that such gunners work, 

have in other civilized countries. We Ohio is next door to Indiana. The 

know that there is a big prejudice against best that could be done in that State this 

these good old honest souls which some- year, we are told, was to permit the 

how does not attach to similar charac- profitable breeding of pheasants only 

ters who take fish for us to eat. We under a law providing for a 50-cent li- 

have been willing to compromise and let cense. If , Mr. Talbot can reform his 

the market gunners be kept out of their neighboring State, Ohio, we will shout 

homes in the country until such time as for joy. 
those who wish to destroy game for fun * " 

produce enough to help fill the markets. CORRESPONDENCE. 

The reason market gunners can sell Editor Game Breeder: 
game abroad is, no doubt, that the farms This is for publication if you can give 

and other private lands are made to pro- it space. 

duce game as they should. It has al- I thank you for the publication of my 
ways seemed strange to us when a "true portrait in your May issue, but I would 
sportsman" remarks that the people own have been more grateful to you if you 
the game and therefore no one can have had taken a sane view of the Indiana law 
any but him. "I will consent," he says, in that issue instead of criticising that 
"to a law that even I cannot give any law. It is no pleasure for me to see my 
away." Is it no longer more blessed to portrait publisheci in conjunction with a 
give than to receive? Game is a highly principle or argument that I know to 
valuable food for invalids. Any physi- be absolutely wrong, because it seems to 
cian will say that it has a special value lend my sanction to the erroneous views 
besides tempting the appetite. When a expressed by you concerning legislation, 
"game hog" who had shot a few more Your idea of only permitting game 
birds than he needed proved that he had breeding by private individuals for profit 
sent them to a hospital the great ex- under a license from the State is en- 
pounder of the "game hog" idea, Shields, tirely wrong. Your idea that game pro- 
f rankly said :^^ "That is an extenuating duced by private individuals should not 
circumstance. be sold except after having been tagged 
We are willing to go the limit, or after a permit has been received from 
Brother Talbot, and we sincerely hope some State officer is entirely wrong, 
you will join us when we restore the Your views on this matter will not make 
good old wild fowlers to their cabins by it right and it is your views on this mat- 
the sea. As a matter of compromise, ter that keep The Game Breeder from 
however, we consent for the present to being the success that it should be. 
delay them until game becomes so If no one could raise ducks or chick- 
abundant that everyone can have it, ens without a State license, practically no 

cheaper than poultry," just as the in- farmer would raise them. If no one 

habitants of other civilized countries could sell ducks or chickens without 

^^^ ^\- first obtaining a tag or a permit from 

Again we say we are delighted that State authorities, there would be very 

Indiana is in advance of the more game few offered for sale. Your ancestors 

possession. We shall observe the in- who first domesticated animals did so d 

dustry in that State and we hope to re- because they were not hampered by any ■ 

port It fully. Our difiference is simply license foolishness or tag foolishness. It 

one of expediency and we believe we is all nonsense to say that such laws 

know what can be done and what can- safeguard wild game. They do nothing 

not be done just now in some localities of the kind. Laws prohibiting the kill- 

Ijetter than Mr. Talbot does. We are ing or selling of wild game and placing 

wUhng to make haste slowly since we upon any person prosecuted the burden 



THE GAME BREEDER 



89 



of showing that the game he sold was 
raised in domesticity .would be a good 
law. A law that compels correspondence 
and expenditure of money in red tape 
as a prerequisite to game breeding is, if 
you will pardon the expression, damned 
nonsense, and you never can expect 
either through The Game Breeder or 
otherwise to do much toward proper 
laws and free game until you quit apolo- 
gizing for proper laws for game breed- 
ing. 

I noticed that when the Indiana law 
was first proposed you were inclined to 
find fault with its wording. Now you 
are inclined to find fault with it because 
it gives the people of Indiana an oppor- 
tunity to raise game. It may interest you 
to know that I have on file clippings 
from twenty-seven Indiana papers en- 
dorsing this law and urging the people 
to begin game breeding. They take the 
common sense view, which is not your 
view. Your view that it will not result 
in game breeding is wrong. It is already 
doing so. 

If it is your purpose to pay salaries to 
officers whether they be needed or not, 
you are adopting the right course in 
your editorial department. 

I trust you will give publicity to this 
letter because I do not want to be mis- 
understood and I do not want anybody 
to use my name to mislead the people 
as to what should be enacted in the form 
of game laws. 

Yours very truly, 
John W. Talbot, 
Secy. Game Bird Society. 

Indiana. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

Some two years ago I wrote an ar- 
ticle for Outing Magazine in which I 
discussed this very question, of markets 
for game under regulations. In this 
article I endeavored to show that con- 
siderable areas of our country, not alone 
in the West, but in the East also, contain 
large tracts of mountainous and other 
land that is not and never will be 
adapted to agricultural purposes but 
which would support deer and elk and 
other large game. In Dutchess County, 



New York, the county in which I live, 
we have sufficient land of this character 
to keep the entire county in fresh meat, 
if it were fenced and deer and elk and 
other animals of this character were pro- 
pagated upon it. These animals could 
be raised on such land at almost no ex- 
pense — the expense indeed would consist 
of a little feeding during winter months 
when the ground is covered with snow, 
and in this part of New York State such 
periods are short. 

I also endeavored to show in the ar- 
ticle mentioned that our present restric- 
tions stand in the way, pretty absolutely, 
of any investment along these lines. 
There is no one in this country who is 
more deeply interested in game preser- 
vation than myself, but at the same time 
I believe that our laws should be com- 
mon sense laws that would permit us to 
propagate domesticated deer and sell 
them. Of course, this would have to be 
under supervision that would be strict 
enough to eliminate the possibility of 
wild game being killed and run in upon 
the market. It seems to me that a law 
might be framed which would safeguard 
our wild game and at the same time per- 
mit the domesticated game to be killed 
and sold in the open market and shipped 
from one State to anothen Such a law 
of course would have to be strictly en- 
forced. The trouble with a great many 
of our conservationists is that they are 
unpractical in their methods, and lean 
backward in the attempt to walk 
straight. 

Yours very truly, 
Dillon Wallace. 

Dutchess Co., N. Y. 

[The New York laws now permit th<^ 
profitable breeding of deer, pheasants 
and two species of ducks for sale. Many 
deer and birds are bred in your county 
and sold in New York City at excellent 
prices. We hope you will favor the sale, 
in the New York markets, of game pro- 
duced by industrious breeders in other 
States. — Editor.] 

Editor Game Breeder: 

The bill legalizing pheasants for com- 
mercial purposes passed both branches 



90 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Caught 51 Rats One Week 

1 2 one day in one trap, (resets itself) • 
Catches daily, always clean, lasts for years, 
22 inches high, made of galvanized iron, can't 
get out of order, weighs 9 pounds. When 
rats and mice pass device they die. Cheese 
is used, doing away with poisons. One sent 
prepaid on receipt of $3. Mouse trap 10 
inches high, $1. Money back if not satisfied. 

M. D. SWARTS 

Inventor and Manufacturer 
Universal Rat and Mouse Traps 

Box S66 Scranton, Pa. 



and is now a law. It did not include 
wild ducks. There was much opposition 
due no doubt to the fact that the propo- 
sition is entirely new, if not radical. 
The argument was used, and with good 
effect, that during the open season next 
fall, ducks would be slaughtered in the 
marshes by parties who had previously 
procured a breeders' license, and who 
would thus be protected. Ducks will nr 
doubt be included next .year if no unsat- 
isfactory results follow the pheasant ex- 
perience. 

We are putting out a considerable 
number of birds and hope to distribute 
15,000 to 20,000 eggs. 

Thanking you for kindly interest in 
our work, 

Very truly yours, 
. John C. Seaks, 

Columbus, Oho. Chief Warden. 

Editor. Game Breeder : 

Answering your letter of April 26th. 
It is my belief that closing the market 
to game was a radical step in progress, 
and the only way for getting together 



all loose ends of the question. Now 
that this has been done, the next step 
in progress will consist in allowing game 
producers to raise their very desirable 
food supply in great quantities, and to 
have such game animals and birds enter 
the market under the supervision of a 
State department. 

Robert T. Morris, M. D. 
New York. 



MY LITTLE BOB-WHITES. 

- By Mary C. Wilkie. 

The story of my little quail does not 
end so well as that of the wild turkeys 
but I have always thought that, but for 
the interference of a white Leghorn hen, 
their career would have been fully as suc- 
cessful. We took a dozen eggs out of a 
quail's nest and set them under an ordin- 
ary Plymouth Rock hen. While she was 
a good setter, she broke egg after egg, 
until only six remained. All hatched and 
the little ones were tiny downy balls, with 
the loveliest markings I ever saw. At 
first they ate potato bugs, flies and seeds, 
and had learned their foster mother's 
cluck. I kept her confined in a wire 
coop while the little Bobs ran in and 
out at will. I moved the coop around 
and the young birds grew tame and ate 
readily from my hand. I could easily 
have had the coop in the garden, but 
never dreamed of harm. One day a 
White Leghorn hen came along and 
gobbled them up, every one. 



( Continued from page 8§. ) 

four years of age and then continue 
breeding^ — how long we do not know — 
some of my best breeders are well past 
fifty years of age and show no apparent 
signs of senility yet. 

We sell the young pairs, when fully 
grown, at $8 the pair and I offer a few 
mated breeding pairs, due to breed this 
spring as well, for $15 the pair and will 
cheerfully exchange any of these pairs 
after the second year, if they fail to 
breed, provided they are given a proper 
chance to nest. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



91 




PUPPIES FOR SALE by Robt. de Merliment out of " Horner's Gaby ". both sire and dam field trained, 
and won, "Rob" 1 st and "Gaby" 2nd, New York Open Class, do^s and bitches shown together. 

H. J. MORSE ... Gardner, Mass. 



The Most Popular Event! 

at a house party or week-end gathering is usually the 

TRAPSHOOTING 




THE DU PONT HAND TRAP 



contest. Men and women of all ages join in The Sport Alluring with the same enthusiasm. 
Spacious grounds and permanent installations are not necessary to enjoy this fascinating 
pastime. At your home, in camp or on your 
motor boat you can shoot to your heart's content 
by using the Du Pont 

HAND TRAP 

to throw your targets. It weighs only six pounds and will 
fit into suitcase with targets 
and shells. 

Price, $4.00 delivered. 

For our free booklets on trap- 
shooting, write Depi. 3548. 

DU PONT POWDER CO. 

Established 1892 
Wilmington Delaware 



i 1 




HAND TRAP SHOOTING ON THE LAWN 



92 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

THE GAME BREEDER 



150 Nassau Street 



New "Sork City 



I^lVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs lor sale; several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfidd. N. J. 

GET WISE— RAISE PHEASANTS KOR PASTIME. 
Profitable and fascinating. Send for prices. CON- 
NECTICUT FARMS PHEASANTRY, Union, Union 
County, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game P ark. 

WILD GEESE. DUCKS, SWANS, ETC SEE Dis- 
play advertisement in this issue. WHEALTON WILD 
WATER-FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island, Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSSiN, Yardley, Bucks 
County. Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet wlih order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES.Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (loti 

CASH PAID FOR PEA FOWLS. State age and sex 
Will buy soo Ring Necks, 100 Acuherst. 100 Goldens, too 
Reeves State your best price. HELEN BARTLETT 
Cassopiili'i. Michi gan. 

WILD DUCKS, GEESE. PHEASANTS. PEA FOWL, 
Guineas, and Barred Rock Chickens of highest quality 
of perfection with a great show record back of them. 
OAK GROVE POULTRY YARDS, YorkviUe, Illinois 

FOR SALE.-WILD DUCKS AND GEESE, MAL- 
lards. Pintail, Snow Geese, White Fronts, Canadas, 
for propagating and scientific purposes, at resisonable 
prices. All birds in good condition. Write GEO. J. 
KLEIN, EUinwood, Kansas. 

PEACOCKS. ALL KINDS OF PHEASANTS, WHITE 

African Guineas, for sale, pure blooded, non-rt-lated. I 

will buy Amhtrst, Reeves and Pea fowls. JOHN TAL- 

BOT, South Bend. Indiana. q-i4-6m. 

FOR SALE-IMPORTED AUSTRALIAN PAPEBAR- 
RON geese, white India sacred doves, Australian crested 
pigeon, large bronze winged doves, pearl-neck doves and 
Mandarin ducks. THE AVIARY, East Lake Park, Los 
Angeles, California. 

WE CAN FURNISH PHEASANTS, WILD Dl CKS, 

rare animals, birds of all kinds Pure bred dogs. Angora 

cats, monkeys, ferrets, etc Circulars free. DETROIT 

BIRD STORE, Detroit. Mich. 

FALLOW DEER, HARES. AND HUNGARIAN PAR- 
TRIDGES wanted .for March delivery; quote prices 
SAMUEL WILBUR. Engli.shiown, N J. 

FOR SALE — PEACOCK, each $6.00; MAMMOTH 
Flemish Rabbit $4 0(» a pair at six months. Angora 
rabbit .If 1 00 a pair. Pigeons: silvered pouters $5 00 a 
pair, white fantails $2.00, white dragon ■f2 00, red homer 
$1 00 J. J. GAREaU, St. Roch I'Achigan, Quebec Can. 

PHEASANTS OF NINE VARIETIES; STOCK AMD 
eggs. Ringneckscontractableby the thousand. DAISY 
FARM, San Lorenzo, California. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price. A.J MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 



DOGS 



BEARHOUNDS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, BLOOD- 
HOUNDS. Fox, deer cat and lion hounds. TrainetJ 
and young stock. 50-page illustrated catalogue 5-cent 
stamp. ROOKWOUD KENNELS, Lexington, Ky. 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS. IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. AH 
trained. Shioped on trial Satis.facfion guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly- 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS. Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer bounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, English bloodhounds, beat and 
lion hounds, also Airedale terriers. All dogs shipped 
purchaser to judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instruc- 
tive and interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps 
or coin. 

AIREDALES — THE GREAT ALL 'ROU.\D DOG. 
Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent ; 
have (luppies, grown dogs and brood matrons Send for 
large list. W. R. WATSON, Box 711, Oakland. Iowa. 

DOGS TRAINED AND BOARDED. BEST AR- 
ranged kennels in the South, located on 10.000 acres 
leased hunting grounds ; forced retrieving taught dogs of 
any age ; my methods never fail ; thirty years experience. 
JESS M. WHAITE. Cyrene, Decatur Co., Ga. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS— THOR- 

oughbred Stock — Bred and raised on the James River 
and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost every day of the 
Duck Shooting Season. Dogs and puppies for sale. Just 
fisht to break this Fall. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia 



Our Wild Fowl 
and Waders 

A Practical Book on Wild Duck 
Breeding for Sport or Profit. 

Fully Illustrated $1.50 



The Game Breeder 

150 Nassau Street New York 



In vrriting to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: •'Youri for Mote Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



93 



CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS. 
Thoroughbred stock. Bred and raised on the James 
River and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost everyday 
of the duclf shooting season. Dogs and pups for sale 
4 fine female pupoies 6 months old, at jJio.oO each. Just 
right to break this season. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia. 

FOR SALE— MALE AND FEMALE SETTER PUP- 
PIES. 6 months old, regi'itered stock A. K C $25.00 
will take both. C A. KURZEL, 184 Fairview Ave., 
Jersey City, N. J. N. Y. & N. J. Tel Conn. 



ga.mkke:cpi:r.s 



HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR SUPERINTEMDENT- 
wanted by experienced man as above, 20 years' first-class 
character in England and America Understand raisine 
of all kinds of Game and Ducks, training and management 
of Dogs, trapping of all kinds of Vermin. B, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

SUPERINTENDENT.- Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 vears, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3 coo pheasants have been penned and 
20 000 riised yearly. Understand the raiding of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management ot incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit wairens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St , N. Y. City. 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs. Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 15c Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER— LIFE EXPERIENCED REARING 
land and water fowl, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs, conditioning for shows. A-l rearing pup- 
pies. «ell up in veterinary, competent manager of club or 
private estate. Distance immaterial J. H. W., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

GAMEKEEPER— WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January ist. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 

tion. Thoro ighly experieneed in reating pheasants, 

wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; 26 years" experien e. 

Can be highly recommended R J. M., care of The Game 

* Breeder. 150 Nassau Sireet. New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F.. care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street. New York. 

EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 
Private Estate. Age 20 to 24. Apply to T. B., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly understands Pheasant and Wild Duck 
raising, (will rear Pheasants by contract). Incubators, 
management of deer, rearing and training of dogs, vermin 
trapping. Well recommended. Address W. S., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 



GAME E.GGS 



BOOK YOUR ORDER NOW FOR CHINESE RING- 
neck pheasant eggs. Oregon's famous game bird. S3 00 
per dozen. $v0.00 per hundred. OREGON BIRD & 
PHEASANT FARM. Beaverton, Oregon. 



FINEST STRAIN OF ENGLISH RING-NECKED 
PHEASANT EGGS for sale during June; $'5.00 per 
hundred, in lots of not less than lOo eggs. Apply to 
DUNCAN DUNN, Superintendent, State Game Farm, 
Forked River, N. J. 

MALLARD DRAKES AND EGGS FOR SALE. Eggs 
at the rate of $2.00 a setting. REDDEN QUAIL CLUB, 
Paoli. Pennsylvania. 

WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS $1.50 per dozen; safe 
delivery anywhere, full blooded (send draft), no limit, 
large orders $10 co hundred. C. E. BREMAN CO., 
Danville, Illinois 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early delivery. $2 50 per setting 

of 15 eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthington, Minn. 

FOR SALE-PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
Golden and pure Lady Amherst. One pair year old 
hybrid birds for sale. E. R. ANDERSON, So. Hamilton, 
P. O, Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS IN JUNE, $4.80 PER HUNDRED. 
THOS. COWLEY GAME FARM, Mawdesley, Orms- 
kirk, England. 

ENGLISH RING-NECK PHEASANTS' EGGS FOR 
HATCHING, from strong healthy stock. $3 a setting. 
$23 a hundred. Miss HOPE PICKERING, Hope Poultry 
Farm, Rumford, R.I. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR DELIVERY IN MAY AND 
JUNE. $15 per 110; $125 per 1100. Guaranteed !t0% fer- 
tile. Packed in dry wood will keep good for a month. 
ARTHUR DAVIS. The Pheasantries, Denner Hill, Great 
Wissenden, Buck, England (Associate Game Guild) 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
$3.00 per setting. ERNEST WOODER, Oxford Jet , 
Iowa 



GAM£ BIRDS "VirANTCD 



WANTED-IMPEYAN, ELLIOTT, SWINHOE, MAN- 
churian, fireback, peacock. Mexican Royal and other 
fancy stock pheasants ; also quails. Bob-white, grouse, wild 
doves, squirrels wood-duck, white peafowl and Java pea- 
fowl. F. WEINBERG. East Lake Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 

I AM IN THE MARKET FOR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

WANTED— ANY OF THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES 
of pheasants. Must be in full feather and free from scaly 
leg and in good health. Swinhae, Tragopan Satyr Blylh 
Tragopan, Veilot FirebacK. White Crested Pheasants, 
Soemmering, Cheer Elliotts, Borneo Fireback. Pair Man- 
churian Eared that have bred in captivity. In addressing 
this office state age. number, sex and lowest cash price. 
CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. 



PIGEONS 

BEST HOMERS AND CARNEAUX PIGEONS TIME 
and money can produce. Pictures and description free. 
Write NATIONAL SQUAB FARM, Itasca, Texas. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

RUFFED GROUSE WANTED, STATE PRICE. 
A. r. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WANTED— ACORNS. STATE PRICE PER BUSHEL. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Sireet, 
New York. 

RANCHED RAISED MINK FOR SALE— FOXES, 
raccoons, skunks, carncaux pigeons. TARMAN'S 
FUR FARM, Quincy, Pennsylvania. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



94 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD MALLARD DUCKS-RAISED AND REGIS- 
tered in old Wisconsin. Eggs $i 25 per 12 ; birds $1 50 
each. Excellent decoys. Order now. E.G. SHOWERS, 
Onalaska, Wisconsin. 

BEAR CUB, HALF GROWN MALE, VERY TAME, 
never confined, bargain. Box 327, Lexington, Kentucky. 

WANTED— COPIES OF THE GAME BREEDER FOR 
June, 1913 ; September, 19(3 ; April, 1914 ; June, 1914; 
December, 1914. We will pay 20 cents per copy for a 
few copies of ttie issues named in good condition. THE 
GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 

GERMINABLE WILD RICE SEED. SHIPMENT IN 
time for Spring sowing. Shipped wet as recommended 
by Department of Agriculture. Order now. ROBERT 
CAMPBELL, Keene, Ont. 

WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 

WANTED— ACORNS. State price per bushel. M. TAN- 
ENBAUM, 149 Broadway, New York City. 



PHEASANT EGGS 

Place your order for eggs now — from the 
Pheasantries of the well-known Blooming 
Grove Hunting and Fishing Club, Pike Co., 
Pa. We have raised thousands of pheas- 
ants yearly for the past eight years and 
carry only the best stock of hardy, strong 
flying English Ring-necked birds. Our 
eggs are carefully selected and packed. 

Price $3.00 per clutch of 15, 
or $18.00 per 100. 

BLOOMING GROVE CLUB, 220 Broadway, N. Y. 



WILD DUCK EGGS 

from strong flying birds which were 
bred wild in a marsh. Original 
Stock from The Game Breeders' 
Association. 

For prices write 

Dr. HENRY HEATH, Jr., 

ORIENT, L. I., N. Y. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

Practical Book on Duck Breeding 
for Sport and Profit 

$1.50 

The Game Breeder, 159 Nassau St., N. Y. C. 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties." 

Wood Ducks, Mandarins, Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 



Our Feathered Game - - $2.00 
Our Big Game - - - - 2.00 
The Game Breeder (for one year) 1.00 

$5.00 

Special Offer for This Month 

We will send the two books j^_ 

and the magazine for one year ^^ nil 

THE GAME BREEDER 
150 Nassau Street New York, N. Y. 



I 



More Game, and Fewer Game Laws 



In writing to ad \rortiaers please mention Tiie Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



I 



THE GAME BREEDER 



95 



MALLARD EGGS 

FOR SALE 

From Hand Raised Wild Mallards 

on Free Range, Stock 

Unsurpassed. 

$25.00 per 100, in lots of a 100 

110 to the 100 

$20.00 per 100, in lots of 500 

110 to the 100 

$3.60 per setting of 15 Eggs 
A. SCOTX, Gamekeeper 

Froh-Heim Game Preserve 
FAR HILLS NEW JERSEY 




Mallard Eggs From Strong 
Flying Birds 

April Delivery 
$25.00 per hundred 

Later Deliveries 
$20.00 per hundred 

Orders booked and filled in the 
order in which they are received 

T. A. M. 

Care of 

THE GAME BREEDER 
150 Nassau St., New York 













-M /'/J//T'/] 





THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring Ducks hundreds of miles— my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year — also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh from their native haunts — 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I have the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. Mallards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write tor My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 



Eggs and Pheasants 
For Sale 

We are now booking orders for eggs of 
the following varieties : Pheasants, Silver, 
Golden, Ringneck, Mongolian, Reeves, Am- 
herst, Versicolor, Prince of Wales. We also 
offer for sale all of the above varieties as 
well as Impeyan, Peacock, Swinhoe and 
Manchurian Eared, also Japanese Longtails 
Blue Peafowls, White Peafowls. 

WANTED 

Peafowl, Pheasants and Ducks 

We are also in the market for any of 
following : White Peafowl, Japanese Black- 
shouldered or Java ; in Pheasants, any of 
Tragopans, Firebacks, Cheer, Somering, 
Elliott, Kalij-Whitecrested, also Canvas- 
back ducks. In writing quote number, sex 
and lowest cash price. 

We will on receipt of 20 cents send color- 
type catalogue of pheasants and fowls, both 
land and water. 

CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



96 THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

The new YORK times 

"The subject is the development of a new crop — a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated duck?, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

"'Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially m America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly -and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

"I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finis, 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume.' 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 



Pennsylvania Pheasantry and Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 





. C^IV ,^rr. 



Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Strans of Knerland. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. 1 have flO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — It will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



REAL ESTATE 

FOR S ALE^ a Tract of land suitable 
for a game park or preserve. 
Contains 2500 acres^ two lakes^ trout 
streams^ part cleared, balance wood- 
land. Timber alone is worth the 
price asked for the land. 

This tract is well suited for a 
Game Breeding Association or Shoot- 
ing Club. It is located on the Dela- 
ware River, not far from Port Jervis. 

There are a number of buildings 
suitable for Club purposes. 

We have other properties adapted 
for Game Breeding Associations and 
Shooting and Fishing Preserves. 

For Particulars address 

W. G. LYNCH 

The W. G* Lynch Realty Co* 

Long Acre Building - - New York 



S^Miff^ 




Sinj^le Copies 10 'P 







THE- 



QAN E DBEEDEB 



VOL. VII, 



JULY, 1915 



No. 4 




The- Object of this magazine- is 
TO Make- North America the 5iggest 
Gahe Producing Country in the Woqld 



CONTENTS 




Survey of the Field — More Fish — More Fish Raising and Less 
Fish Hatching — Attitude of the Audubon Association — The 
"More Game" Campaign Won — A Waste of Game — Wild Ducks 
for State Game Officers — Raising Deer in Connecticut — Persistent 
Rumors— Don't Buy in Rhode Island — More Game— The Merry 
Dachshunds. 



Quail Breeding in Virginia - 
The Prairie Grouse, Second Paper 
The Fish and Game Clubs of Quebec 
Pheasants and Quail 
Musk Grasses and Duckweeds 



W. B. Coleman 

D. W. Huntington 

Hon. E. T. D. Chambers 

Helen Bartlett 

W. L. McAtee 



Gray Partridges in England and America. 
Notes from The Game Farms and Preserves. 
A Game Census. 
The Game Conservation Society. 

Editorials — Canadian Clubs — Harmony — Correspondence — Notes 
from the State Game Departments — Trade Notes, etc., etc. 




PUSLiaMED BY 

THE- GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIEtTY: Inc 

NEW YORK CITT U.S> rjip^^,j-/s 



TIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 




f«i 



<• 



ARC INDiSPElNSABLE YET INEXPENSIVE 

! I I 1 1 1 

Spratt's Cardiac Spratt's Bone Meal 

"Game Spice" For Game 

contains valuable stimulating^ is an invaluable adjunct to the 

and appetizing properties and soft food diet. It contains 

should be added to staple valuable lime-phosphates and is 

food during raw and inclement much cheaper than fresh bone, 

weather as it frequently wards which contains at least W 

off attacks of Gapes, Diar- moisture and which of necessity 

rhoea and Cramps. has to be given quite fresh. 

Beware of Gapes— Prevention is Better Than Cure 

Spratt's Blackerite 

is the most effective yet agreeable method of completely eradi- 
cating this disease. 

FINE FEATHERS MAKE FINE BIRDS 

Spratt's Partridge Meal 

MAKES BOTH 

Success in raising semi-wild birds can only be obtained by 
care and experience. Correct feeding is half the battle. We 
supply the right kind of ammunition and you will get results 
if you follow directions 

Send for " Pheasant Culture," price 25c. " Poultry Culture " sent on 
receipt of 10c. " Dog Culture" sent on receipt of 2c. stamp. 

SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

Factory and Chief Offices at NEWARK, N. J. 

Depots at San Francisco; St. Louis; Cleveland; Montreal. Agency at Boston, Mass 



THE GAME BREEDER 



97 




98 THE GAME BREEDER 



Game Breeders' Supplies 



WIRE COOPS TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and|Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. GATES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or eggs 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



99 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 

Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 

The Camp Cook Stove 



This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Calnps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
large gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




IRONSIDES 



OF THE LEADING STOVES 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cooic DobuleOven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. lo Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. 90 Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



A FEW 

Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

Newr H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 

Ormond Ranges . Loyal Victor Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves Victor Hotel Ranges 

Victor Gem Cook Elm Ranges 

Laundry Stoves Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 



FURNISHED 

Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



Manufactured by 



S. V. RE:EV£:S, 45 N. 2nd St., PHiladelpHia, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers plaese mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 





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I 



Professor T. GILBERT PEARSON. 

Professor Pearson is the Secretary and Acting Executive Oflficer of the National 
Associations of Audubon Societies. 

He is an able biologist and he well understands why American game has decreased 
rapidly in numbers and what should be done to stop the decrease, and to make the 
desirable wild foods abundant and cheap. "We shall have something more to say about 
Professor Pearson and his work in an article now in preparation. 



I 



T^f Game Breeder 



VOLUME vn 



JULY, t9i5 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 4 



More Fish. 

The more game movement includes 
game fish of course. The truth of the 
matter is the right to produce game fish 
for profit is a httle in advance of the right 
to restore quail on toast and other game 
bird dishes in some of the states. Some 
of our readers make ten thousand a year 
or more in their game fish industry and 
not many of them yet do as well with 
game, big or small. 

Mr. C. H. Townsend, Director of the 
New York Aquarium, discusses the pri- 
vate fish pond as a neglected resource in 
Forest and Stream. He says : 

It is possible for the private citizen to obtain 
pond fishes for breeding purposes, but he needs 
assistance and direction. Object lessons on 
approved methods of fish culture could be 
obtained by visiting public hatcheries, but this 
is not likely to be undertaken. It' would be 
advantageous to the country if state fish com- 
missions generally could supply the coarser 
fishes for cultivation in private waters and 
furnish the public free information as to the 
methods to be followed. 

We should not rest content with the mere 
fact that such information exists in public 
documents. The edition of state documents 
are neither large nor well distributed, and 
rural populations may remain unaware that 
useful fishery information may be had for the 
asking. State fish commissions should not only 
prepare inexpensive pamphlets on the cultiva- 
tion of common fishes, but see that they reach 
many communities and be announced and re- 
viewed by the rural press everywhere. Model 
ponds distributed about the state for demon- 
strative work would, of course, be educational, 
like agricultural colleges and state experiment 
farms. I am not prepared to set forth the best 
means of doing this work, perhaps no two 
states would undertake it the same way. 

Kansas issued a series of illustrated 
bulletins on Pond Fish Culture and we 
understand Massachusetts has this work 
started. It is quite as important to have 
more fish and fewer fish laws as it is to 
have more game and fewer g'ame laws. 
We are glad to see our good neighbor, 



Forest and Stream, gettting interested in 
more fish. 

More Fish Raising and Less Fish 
Hatching. 

Mr. Townsend well points out that 
the number of fish raised is badly out 
of proportion to the number of fry pro- 
duced : 

I am convinced that some of the energy put 
into the production of fry is misdirected. The 
output is amazing. Practically all of it is hur- 
ried into the nearest river and none of it 
raised. We are all doing about the same thing 
and have settled into the rut of fish hatching 
in hatchery buildings. No one is doing any- 
thing new except as connected with the com- 
petition for increased output. 

Having practiced these wholesale methods 
for two or three decades, let us now consideir 
whether we might not profit by a little less fish 
hatching and a little more fish raising. Does 
salvation lie only in a multiplicity of expensive 
Federal and state hatcheries ? If our_ fishery 
establishments were equipped to raise and 
market one per cent, of the fry now being 
hatched and liberated, might not the quantity 
of food thus produced exceed that which 
eventually reaches market by way of the public 
waters? Let us simplify our art and teach it 
to the people, for they can surely help in the 
production of fish food. 

The object of the Game Conservation 
Society and its publication, The Game 
Breeder, always has been to teach the 
people the art of profitable game and 
game fish production' and incidentally to 
teach the game officers not to arrest them 
on account of their industry. We have 
labored to make it impossible for such ab- 
surd arrests and we have helped to have 
many absurd crimes removed from the 
statutes. It is gratifying to observe that 
the state game departments, for the most 
part, now realize that it would be an easy 
matter for all of the people to have cheap 
game and cheap fish, provided they can 
interest the people in producing them 
profitably. Syndicates of sportsmen using 



102 



THE GAME BREEDER 



only a few of the many posted farms in 
a state with the consent of their owners 
soon should be able to send a big lot of 
this desirable food to the markets and in 
this way they will make the people friend- 
ly to sport as we have pointed out often. 

Attitude of the Audubon Association. 

The attitude of the Audubon Associa- 
tion is now decidedly in line with the re- 
marks made by Mr. Townsend. Two at- 
tractive and well illustrated bulletins 
issued recently by the Association are in- 
tended to arouse an interest in the pro- 
duction of the wild food birds for profit. 
The bulletins are filled with practical 
information about the proper handling 
of quail, grouse, wild fowl and other 
game birds, and they will do much 
towards putting an end to the idea that 
game produced by industry should not 
be freely transported and sold to the 
people as food. 

The More Game Campaign Won. 

The good old dean of American sports- 
men was right when he observed that the 
campaign for more game had been won. 
We hardly believed it when we read his 
letter, but now we are sure of it. Many 
details remain to be worked out in the 
various states. These will be attended 
to by local interests, no doubt. Mean- 
time, The Game Breeder, as the trade 
paper of the new industry, will continue 
to publish the news of the legislative 
amendments, and it will give more and 
more space to articles about how to rear 
successfully; how to shoot successfully; 
how to market successfully; how to cook 
successfully, and we have no doubt the 
dear people will do the rest with avidity. 

A Waste of Game. 

The great waste of an amazing output 
of fry mentioned by Mr. Townsend sug- 
gests the great waste of valuable game 
birds which has occurred in the public 
plantings in many states. Hundreds of 
thousands of dollars have been expended 
in the purchase of live game birds which 
have vanished from the earth soon after 
they were liberated in states where shoot- 
ing was prohibited to give the game a 
chance to multiply. Practical game 



breeders know the reason why the birds 
disappeared. Many foxes and other crea- 
tures which are classed by game keepers 
as vermin no doubt smacked their lips 
and gave thanks to the state authorities 
if such animals ever give thanks for good 
things furnished as freely as the gray 
partridges, pheasants and other game 
birds have been furnished. 

We are strongly in favor of the state 
^ame officers purchasing game even more 
liberally than they have in the past and 
they no doubt will when they understand, 
as many now do, how to liberate the 
game. It should be started on a number 
of game farms where good and skilled 
beat keepers are employed to look after 
it properly and it no doubt will multi- 
ply under such conditions, and spread out 
in all directions. Valuable game birds 
should not be scattered thinly over a state 
to fall an easy prey to vermin or a lack 
of proper natural foods. The best plan 
of course is to distribute the game to 
those who will agree to look after it prop- 
erly. Every game protective association 
and every gun club should have some, 
provided they will look after it. They 
should sell some of the game produced to 
help pay expenses. 

Wild Ducks for State Game Officers. 

Many State game officers are unaware 
that wild ducks are probably the best 
game birds they can invest in. Many 
think, no doubt, that wild ducks, being 
migratory birds, and very wild, would 
soon desert if they be purchased and 
liberated. This was the idea entertained 
by game keepers in England a few years 
ago. 

Those who have read Mr. Hunting- 
ton's book, "Our Wild Fowl and Wad- 
ers," know that wild ducks are the easiest 
game birds to handle and rear ; that they 
are almost free from diseases ; that they 
can be kept at home, without difficulty, 
and allowed to depart a few at a time or 
many at a time. They will fly about and 
visit nearby waters, furnishing sport to 
many guns ; they will fly home when too 
much shot at ; they will breed the second 
season and thereafter if some stock birds 
be trapped and pinioned or wing clipped 
during the winter when (even in the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



103 



northern States) a cheap shed is all the 
shelter they will need. Many birds can 
be permitted to migrate. Some will be 
shot within the State; some without the 
State, no doubt, but the number which 
will return to nest in the Spring will be 
found to be quite satisfactory when the 
fact that the Winter feeding has cost 
nothing is considered. The danger is not 
that the birds will be too wild but that 
they will become too tame. By letting 
them fly about and by not feeding them 
too much this difficulty easily is over- 
come. The State would do well to en- 
courage every farmer who has any water 
(the smallest creek or pond will do), 
to rear wild ducks for sport and for pro- 
fit. Sportsmen can be found who will 
enjoy the shooting. The people who eat 
will furnish the money to pay for the 
sport. 

Raising Deer in Connecticut. 

The Norwich Bulletin says: 

There appears to be good reason back of 
the bill which would give the people of Con- 
necticut the right to raise deer for the market, 
and it is not surprising that the hearing thereon 
should have brought forth no objection, but 
many advocates. At the present time the State 
of Connecticut is engaged in the business of 
raising deer at the expense of the individual 
raisers of crops, but it is against the law to 
kill them except under certain conditions, and 
the placing of the venison on the market is 
absolutely prohibited. 

What is sought under the proposed legisla- 
tion is the right to establish a new industry. 
The right to raise deer the same as other live 
stock, in an enclosure which would give them 
the proper protection, does not appear to be 
an unreasonable request. Cattle and sheep are 
to-day raised for the market and the business 
returns a good profit to a large number of 
farmers. Why shouldn't it be possible for 
them to raise deer under proper conditions? 
There can certainly be no more objection to 
the raising of deer to kill than there can be 
for doing likewise by domesticated animals. 
Though there may be less sentiment in behalf 
of the provision in the bill which would allow 
a person engaged in such business to sell 
shooting rights for sportsmen seeking deer be- 
cause of the thickly populated conditions, there 
can be no apparent objection to the idea of con- 
tributing to the supply of fresh meat through 
the raising of deer. In fact, it would have 
been better if the State's activities in behalf of 
deer had been confined to that privilege which 
is now being sought. 

The venison crop undoubtedly would 
soon be a big and profitable crop in Con- 



necticut and it could be made to utilize 
much land which is now of little value 
and unused, provided the American 
breeders can have the same freedom 
which foreign breeders enjoy. We have 
seen wagon loads of imported deer go- 
ing from the docks to the dealers in New 
York, but if any Connecticut breeder 
should send his meat to this excellent 
market the food would be seized and the 
dealer who handled it would be arrested. 
Even if the State game officers should 
tag the deer and notify the New York 
game police that it was the personal 
property of a Connecticut breeder who 
had the right to sell the food, this would 
make no difference. New York denies all 
wild food producers in other States the 
right to sell their food. The people have 
a Statue of Liberty but foreigners have 
the liberty in the New York market. 

Persistent Rumors. 

During the last few days there have 
been persistent rumors, to the effect that 
Germany was seeking the Remington 
Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Com- 
pany and some of the minor concerns in 
America "not so much," the Commercial 
Financial World says, "on account of any 
shortage of ammunition for its own 
armies, as with a view to putting an end 
to the tremendous shipments which are 
going forward to the allies." 

Mr. Samuel F. Pryor, Vice-President 
and General Manager of the Remington 
Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co., 
was emphatic in asserting that there was 
not the slightest foundation for the 
rumors. Mr. Pryor added that the addi- 
tions to the plant did not constitute a 
mere temporary expedient, but were 
largely made in accordance with the gen- 
eral policy of expansion adopted by the 
Company before the beginning of the 
war and this policy would not be inter- 
fered with even if the war were to come 
to an end to-morrow. 

This is good news. What would 
sporting America be without the Rem- 
ingtons ? 

The Game Conservation Society is now 
the largest association of game breeders 
in the world. 



104 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Don't Buy in Rhode Island. 

People who wish to purchase farms or 
country places are advised not to buy 
property in Rhode Island. The arrest 
of farmer Austin for producing game 
food on his farm seems incredible but 
we have it over his signature that he 
was arrested twice for this remarkable 
crime — food producing! Think of it! 
in a land so near the land of the free, 
Massachusetts, that one can step out of 
one state into the other. 

"More Game." 

Mr. C. M. Bernegau, President of The 
Game Breeders' Association sends the 
following statistics showing there is 
"more game" in Germany. Over fifteen 
million dollars worth is some game to be 
sure, but it is a safe bet that America 
will make these figures look silly in about 
three years. Germany is about the size 
of the American National Parks. We 
have a few extra prairies, mountains, 
fields, forests and farms outside the 
parks, all of which can be made to yield 
game abundantly. Hundreds of thou- 
sands of game eggs were produced by 
private industry and these are the eggs 
which count. People who buy things 
seem to do better with them than those 
who receive small donations from the 
State. The German figures are interest- 
ing and instructive. If our parks can 
be made to produce as much as Germany 
does what would the returns be if one 
half of the remaining land should be 
made to produce game. 

"According to the German Imperial 
Statitics for 1912, the following game 
was killed in Germany and offered for 
public sole: 



The Merry Dachshunds. 

A Chicago reader, writing to the 
Rural New Yorker, says : 

I noticed the unsatisfactory reply to "A 
Curse of Rabbits," in Dec. 26 issue. I have 
been in a similar position but rabbits, skunks 
and weasels have become rare guests on my 
poultry farm, as well as rats, since I have 
bought German dachshunds. These little fel- 
lows are bred to a size that allows them to 
enter a badger's or fox's hole, weigh about 
12 to 15 pounds. They are not able to race 
a rabbit, but since they have an excellent scent 
they will dig out every one of them. If they 
scent a rabbit in a hole you cannot drive them 
away with a club. On my wood lot rabbits 
keep themselves mostly under brush and not so 
much in holes, but skunks have troubled us 
more. It takes a courageous dog to get a 
family of skunks out, to brave that blinding 
srnell, to go in again and again, although half 
blind, and the saliva running out in white 
streams from their mouth. It is a pleasure 
to watch these little fellows bite roots one 
inch thick with their teeth in order to get 
nearer to the animals. My German tenant 
paints all my small fruit trees around the 
ground with a mixture of lime and cow 
manure, and claims this prevents damage from 
rabbits. 

The curious little German dachshund 
—-a dog and a half long and half a dog 
high — as a comic paper described it, is 
quite popular among rabbit shooters. 
Many good dachshunds are owned and 
bred in America. Some of our adver- 
tisers can supply the best. 



my 
up t' 



Falling Straight Ahead. 

Jay Green — I had a ride in 
cousin's automobile while I was 
the city. 

Aaron Allred — Ye did? How'd seem? 

Jay Green — Waal, it felt a good deal 
like fallin' into a mighty deep well, only 
ye dropped straight ahead instead of 
downward. — Chicago News. 



1 



12,870 


pieces 


of red deer, Valu 


8,940 




" bucks. 


62,600 




" roe, 


4,350 




" black game boar, " 


14,950,000 




" hares, 


8,730,000 




" rabbits, " 


5,260,000 




" pheasants, " 


18,970,000 




" partridges, " 


96,400 




" mountain cocks, wood cocks, 

ducks, heath cocks, snipes, etc. 



M. 



772,200= 

. 402,300= 

939,000= 

152,250= 

31,395,000= 

5,238,000= 

7,890,000= 

15,176,000= 



144,600= 



rabout $ 193,050 

: " 100,000 

: " 234,750 

: " 38,060 

: " 7,848,750 

: " 1,309,500 

: " 1,972,000 

: " 3,794,000 

38,150 



Total value of game oflfered for sale. 



Marks: 62,109,350, or about Dollars 15,529,000. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



105 




Bobwhites — Tame as Chickens. 



QUAIL BREEDING IN VIRGINIA 

By W. B. Coleman. 



I will try and give you some idea how 
I care for my bobwhites. My breeding 
pens are 15 feet long by 5 feet wide. In 
these pens three hen birds may be kept 
with one cock during breeding season 
and eggs be set under bantam hens. They 
may also be penned in pairs. They will 
make nice nests, lay, set and hatch won- 
derfully well. Of course young birds 
must be taken from the mother quail 
before they are well dry and put with 
bantam hens. For the first few days 
they will run off from hen, of course, 
and they have to be confined in a close 
place for several days, after which time 
they may be permitted to run at large. 

It is surprising to see how soon they 
learn the call of the bantams and follow 
her as well as chickens. I raised nine 
bobwhites in our orchard with bantams 
and they were never confined at all ex- 
cept I drove the hen and birds in a box 
with a fly screen door every night just 
as you do chickens. All of my young 
bobwhites were reared in this manner. 

My old birds are as wild as they ever 



were and have to be penned always. 
They never become tame except when 
taken from the wild birds as soon as 
they are hatched. The birds I reared by 
bantams are as tame as chickens and fed 
from the first on yolk of hard boiled egg 
and curd. Feed wheat bran later and 
when old enough to eat it let them have 
crushed grain such as wheat, oats and 
corn fed dry. When penned green food 
must be furnished, also ground oyster 
shells, crushed fine. They should have 
a good dust wallow of dry ashes and all 
such things must be looked after. For 
pens I use some poultry wire, j/2 inch 
mesh, but find fly screen wire best ; this 
keeps out rats, etc. 

It is wonderful to see how well the 
wild quail will do in the closest confine- 
ment. I have one pair of birds in a pen 
made of some wire I had left over which 
is only three by nine feet and the hen 
bird made a beautiful nest and laid thir- 
teen eggs. I had one pair of birds in 
a little larger pen than this and the hen 
laid fourteen eggs anji hatched thirteen 
bobwhites. Before they got out of the 
the nest I took them from the hen quail 



106 THE GAME BREEDER 

and put them with a bantam hen. The experience has cost me a good deal. How- 
photograph I send you was made of ever, I do not believe the day is far off 
some of these fourteen birds. when game breeding will be looked after 
I have lost very few. They can be with a great deal of interest. A number 
reared in large numbers successfully, of our people are beginning to realize 
I do not believe they can be profitably that quail shooting will soon be another 
raised for certainly not less than $25 one of the past sports if game farms are 
per dozen. Owing to the laws of our not established. 

State I have not been allowed to realize I expect to restock some of this sec- 

anything from my birds, although the tion this spring. 



THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 

Second Paper. 

By DwiGHT W. Huntington. 

The late Dr. Sylvester D. Judd per- grouse shooting' in Indiana and I used to 

formed a great public service when he shoot in the Dakotas when the prairie 

wrote the bulletin on "The Grouse and grouse was extending its range to the 

Wild Turkeys of the United States, and northwest, and bagged some of the 

Their Economic Value." This bulletin prairie grouse when shooting its northern 

was issued by the U. S. Department of relative, the sharp-tailed grouse, which 

Agriculture in 1905 as Biological Survey were at the time tremendously abundant 

Bulletin No. 24. in the Dakotas, Montana, and many 

Inviting attention to the fact that the other States, westward to the Pacific 

prairie hen was nearly or quite gone Ocean. 

from large areas in the West, where it Since 1905 the restrictive laws, to 
was numerous a few years ago, and that which Dr. Judd referred, have been mul- 
a number of our game birds are now tiplied; the seasons have been made 
gone or fast disappearing from their for- shorter ; the bag limits have been made 
mer haunts, Dr. Judd said: "An awaken- smaller; and, in some States, the shoot- 
ing appreciation of the real value of ing of prairie grouse has been prohibited 
some of the species and of the indirect for years. Those familiar with the 
danger of their extermination is evinced grouse are well aware as the country be- 
by protective laws that have been enacted comes more densely populated they have 
in recent years throughout the country, decreased in numbers almost every- 
These laws are mainly the outcome of a where and on vast areas they have be- 
realization of the value of the birds from come extinct. The reasons why the laws 
the sportsman's point of view. The in- do not produce the desired results and 
vestigations upon which the present re- make the game plentiful are well known 
port is based show that the farmer has to naturalists and to sportsmen who 
a vastly greater interest at stake in the read The Game Breeder. When the ad- 
increase and protection of some of these ditional check to the increase of the 
birds, notably the bobwhite, than has the grouse (shooting) is added to the ordi- 
sportsman. The importance of the nary checks to their increase (vermin), 
prairie hen as a destroyer of weeds and the grouse must vanish because nature's 
insects has been demonstrated and its balance is upset in the wrong direction, 
value as a food and game bird is well There are other reasons why the grouse 
known." must go more quickly than the quail 

I had the opportunity to shoot the when any shooting is permitted. They 

prairie grouse when they were abundant are birds of the open country, easily 

in Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska and some found and followed with the aid of good 

other States. I have had some good dogs and they are large and correspond- 



THE GAME BREEDER 107 

ingly easy marks. The size of the birds shot. It is very evident that some land 
and their toothsome flavor make them is needed where the wild grasses, wild 
very tempting to those who are not fa- roses, sunflowers, and many other foods 
miliar with the game laws or do not heed and covers should be permitted to grow, 
them. Where there are open seasons It must be evident to sportsmen that the 
some fafmers naturally entertain the farmers will not donate the needed land 
opinion that it is wise to take the field for such food and cover unless they be 
early in order to anticipate the town compensated. It is evident they will not 
gunners who often shoot without per- put in their time controlling the many 
mission and are considered a nuisance in enemi'es of the grouse so long as the 
many cases. When there is a rivalry sportsmen claim to own the game and 
between two classes of gunners as to insist upon the right to destroy it without 
who shall have such desirable food it is providing any means for its protection 
not surprising that nature's balance and increase. Dr. Judd pointed out that 
quickly is upset. The stopping of the the grouse could be restored to Ohio,, 
sale of grouse may have delayed matters Kentucky and other States where it is ex- 
a little but it also has made it not worth tinct but where it once was plentiful- 
while to protect the game properly since Ten years have elapsed however since 
it cannot be done profitably. We should he wrote his bulletin and practically 
always bear in mind the statement of the nothing has been done for the very good 
naturalist, Seaton, that the way to make reason that it does not pay to do anything 
American game abundant is to commer- in the way of practical propagation or 
cialize it. in the way of introducing or restoring 

I have reports of the grouse vanish- the game. The laws in fact now make 

ing from places after the laws prohibited it , impossible, to procure stock birds of 

all shooting. It is easy to understand eggs in most places, and Dr. Shufeldt,. 

why this should occur. All birds need no doubt, had these facts in mind when 

their natural foods and all need cover not he said he was opposed to laws protecting 

only at the nesting time but throughout the game off the face of the earth, 
the year as a protection against their The Game Breeder's enactments which 

natural enemies. When the grouse were already are in the books in some States, 

abundant on the great western prairies, and will be in all we hope soon, will 

prairie grass, wild roses, wild sunflowers make it possible to get stock birds and 

and other plants were abundant. The eggs. The opening of the markets to 

birds had opportunity for concealment the desirable food will make it quite 

and could procure winter foods above the worth while to produce it on many of the 

snow.. On many farms and cattle ranches farms where it no longer occurs and 

the covers and foods have been entirely which are posted against all gunners, 

destroyed and the laws stopping the sale Mackensen, and the other dealers in live 

of the birds and the other destructive game, who advertise in The Game 

enactments cannot possibly make them Breeder, will pay excellent prices for 

plentiful in places where the natural con- grouse and grouse eggs and will be the 

ditions are such that they cannot escape first to sell them. The birds will go to 

' from their natural enemies or secure any people willing to look after them now 

food in the winter. that the laws provide that they can shoot 

It is evident that these birds must be and sell some of the game to help pay ex- 

properly looked after; that some of the penses if they wish to do so. In order 

necessary covers and foods must be re- that sportsmen of small means may form 

stored; that the grouse must not be de- game clubs and have good shooting dur- 

stroyed by fire and flood and farm ma- ing a long open season it is quite neces- 

chinery and by dogs, cats, rats and il- sary they should have the right to sell 

legal gunners and egg gatherers, before both birds and eggs produced by their 

we can restore these splendid food birds industry on the farms where the farmers 

to our markets or ever be able to restore are compensated, 
them to our list of game which can be It is all important that those willing 



108 



THE GAME BREEDER 



to help save the grouse and make them but first of all the ground must be made 

plentiful should know how to go about inhabitable. How to do this and where 

it. The birds can be most successfully to get the stock birds and eggs will be 

and inexpensively reared in a wild state, discussed in another article. 



THE FISH AND GAME CLUBS OF QUEBEC. 

What They Mean to the Province. What Privileges They Enjoy. 

By Hon. E. T. D. Chambers. 



The Province of Quebec is the only 
one of the Dominion which offers to 
sportsmen the practically exclusive privi- 
leges of fishing and hunting over large 
tracts of forest, lake or river territory. 
These privileges are leased to residents, 
non-residents alike, and non-residents 
who are lessees of such privileges, or who 
are members of a club leasing the same, 
are entitled to non-resident fishing and 
hunting licenses at the lowest rates, which 
are only one-half the prices charged to 
other non-residents, and in some instances 
even less. 

The unsettled territory of the Prov- 
ince of Quebec is enormous, so that not- 
withstanding the fact that over five hun- 
dred leases have already been granted to 
sportsmen, there are thousands of miles 
of good sporting territory still available 
for private preserves. Many of the 
leases of fishing or hunting territory, or 
of both fishing and hunting privileges 
combined, are held by private individuals ; 
but over two hundred fish and game 
clubs are incorporated in the Province, 
nearly all of which are lessees of fishing 
and hunting territories. 

Some clubs, having a large member- 
ship and controlling fishing and hunting 
rights, exercise these rights over exten- 
sive tracts of country, from one to two 
hundred square miles each in extent. 
Others are, of course, very much smaller. 
The law limits to two hundred square 
miles the extent of territory that may be 
held for hunting and shooting purposes 
by any one club, and three dollars per 
mile per annum is the minimum price 
that can be charged for shooting privi- 
leges. 

The amount of rental charged for fish- 



ing privileges depends upon both their 
quality and accessibility. Less than fifty 
years ago, a season's lease of the salmon 
fishing in the Grand Cascapedia was of- 
fered for $100. Today no less a sum 
than $12,000 a year is paid for the ang- 
ling rights of a portion of the river. 

The prices paid for fishing privileges 
are in every case exceedingly reasonable. 
Leases for both shooting and fishing 
privileges are usually made for a term 
of five years, but are renewable for simi- 
lar terms, though always at a compara- 
tively slight advance in the rental, be- 
cause of the increasing demand for such 
rights and their rapid improvement in 
actual value. 

Many clubs and private individuals 
erect comfortable camps upon their 
leased fish and game preserves, and some 
of them have erected really luxurious 
suijamer homes in the gorgeous woods of 
our entrancingly beautiful North Coun- 
try, often overlooking a charming bit of 
lake or river scenery. Here they spend 
their summer vacation, or come to enjoy 
their autumnal or winter hunt, often ac- 
companied by the members of their fam- 
ilies. In no part of the world is there 
to be had better water or more healthy 
and ideal camping sites than among the 
Laurentian lake and mountain country of 
the Province of Quebec. 

The fishing rights in the inland waters 
of the Province, wherever the land re- 
mained the property of the Crown, be- 
came vested in the Province in 1882, in 
virtue of a judgment of the Supreme 
Court rendered on the 28th day of April 
of that year, which decided that the right 
of fishing in inland waters belongs to the 
owners of the lands in front of, or 



THE GAME BREEDER 



109 



through which such waters flow. Up to 
that time, practically nothing had been 
officially done towards developing the 
great sporting attractions of this prov- 
ince, outside of the salmon fishing, for 
which a few leases had been granted. 
The provincial authorities at once sought 
means to develop the rights, in the pos- 
session of which they had been confirmed 
as above related. During the first few 
years of their administration by the 
Province, the inland fishing privileges 
were leased on a somewhat limited scale. 
But in a short time the leasing system 
attained considerable proportions. 

The protection of fish and game was 
the main purpose of the leasing system, 
and this purpose it has admirably served. 
In the incorporation of fish and game 
clubs, it is the principal object for which 
the incorporation is granted, and in all 
leases of either fishing or hunting ter- 
ritories, the main condition of the lease 
is the protection of fish and game and 
the enforcement of the fish and game 
laws. It is in consideration of this pro- 
tective work that the valuable privileges 
of practically exclusive fishing, hunting 
and camping are leased on liberal terms 
to Fish and Game Protective Clubs and 
to individual sportsmen. The advan- 
tages enjoyed by these lessees cannot be 
had anywhere else, and amply justify the 
constantly increasing popularity of the 
system. Some of the clubs have quite 
a large membership, and in addition to 
their club houses, their territories can 
now boast the existence, in various pic- 
turesque surroundings, of private camps 
or bungalows or other summer hom.es. 
Others might well follow their example. 
There are many lovers of the woods, in 
both Canadian and American cities, who, 
whether sportsmen or not, would be glad 
to learn of the opportunities of enjoying 
club privileges in the Province of Que- 
bec, and of either sharing the accommo- 
dation that more commodious club build- 
ings or cottages could supply, or of erect- 
ing summer homes in the woods for 
themselves. 

The advantages to the' Province of 
Quebec from the existence of Fish and 
Game Protective Clubs and from the 



system of leasing fishing and hunting 
privileges are enormous. Without the 
efficient protection afforded by the mem- 
bers of these clubs and by the guardian- 
ship which they are required to main- 
tain over the territory entrusted to their 
care, large tracts of country now serving 
as fish and game peserves, whence large 
game, fur, fin and feather overflow into 
the surrounding woods and waters, 
would now be destitute of game and game 
fishes, some of which might even have 
shared the fate of the wild pigeon and 
the buffalo; for it is patent to everyone 
conversant with the tremendous extent of 
our provincial territory and with the fish 
and game conditions thereof, that noth- 
ing short of an army of thousands of 
men could suffice to constitute a perfectly 
efficient system of governmental guard- 
ianship. 

To the peope of the Province, both the 
establishment of Fish and Game Clubs 
and the leasing of fishing and hunting 
territories to private individuals have 
proved extremely advantageous. The 
amount of money spent here by non-resi- 
dent anglers alone is much larger than 
usually supposed. 

An estimate made a few years ago for 
the Commission of Conservation pointed 
out that in one year nearly eleven hun- 
dred non-resident anglers purchased li- 
censes for fishing with rod and line in 
the Province. About two hundred of 
them were salmon fishermen, who paid 
$25 each for their licenses, whether fish- 
ing on the open salmon waters of the 
Province, or being lessees of government 
fishing rights, members of clubs holding 
such leases from Province, or non-resi- 
dent guests of clubs or of owners or 
lessees of salmon fishing rights. Nearly 
four hundred non-residents, not being 
lessees of provincial waters or members 
of incorporated clubs, paid $10 each for 
licenses to angle for other fish than sal- 
mon, while considerably more than five 
hundred non-resident anglers paid $5 
each for licenses for similar fishing 
rights, the reduced cost of such licenses 
being due to the fact that the holders 
were lessees of Crown fishing rights or 
members of clubs. The total amount of 



110 THE GAME BREEDER 

government revenue from angling li- ment published below. For the last few- 
censes was- thus nearly $11,000, and years it has paid out over $30,000 a year 
leases of angling waters brought in $50,- in wages alone, to guardians, guides and 
000 more. other employes, and for provisions and 

This direct revenue from game fisher- other expenditure its outlay runs from 
ies is a very small fraction, however, of $12,000 to nearly $20,000 a year. These 
their actual money value to the Province, figures do not include the amounts paid 
One American salmon fisherman claims out to the railways, hotels and merchants 
that each of his fishing trips to the Prov- of the Province, which are estimated to 
ince of Quebec costs him over $4,000. amount, for the last 25 years, to over 
Some salmon fishermen lease private $300,000 additional, 
waters, and when, in addition to what it The Squatteck Club (Temiscouata 
costs them for fishing rights they pay County), spent over $14,000 in the Prov- 
for their travelling expenses in Canada, ince in one year alone, — 1912, — and the 
their hotel bills, guides, canoes, camps members of the organiaztion have also 
and equipments, supplies, etc., $500 each expended upwards of $10,000, as indi- 
is a reasonable estimate, and often it viduals, and as a club, in the erection of 
amounts to many times that sum. At camps and other permanent improve- 
least two hundred non-resident salmon ments upon their territory. Almost all 
fishermen must have angled in Quebec these amounts are laid out in the imme- 
waters last year, representing a total ex- diate vicinity of the territories leased and 
penditure of $100,000. At least a thou- occupied by these clubs, so that the value 
sand non-resident anglers fish in the of the system should be apparent to 
Province of Quebec for ouananiche, everybody. Moreover, the greater num- 
trout, bass, maskinonge, and other fish, ber of these fish and game territories are 
and it is well within the mark to place wrild lands, often unsuited for agricul- 
their average expenditure in the province ture, so that the money expended in their 
at $100 each. This adds $100,000 to the vicinity is doubly welcome to the resi- 
money value of Quebec's inland game dents of the neighborhood. Where there 
fisheries, making a total of $200,000. are farms in the vicinity, the farmers 

Hunting licenses yielded the Province usually find a good cash market at the 
of Quebec in the same year well over club camps for all their fresh meat, poul- 
$10,000, and leases of hunting territories try, milk, butter and eggs, 
amounted to some $20,000 more. In ad- It must not be supposed that all the 
dition to such revenue, it is well known wild land of the Province is for lease to 
that the money spent by sportsmen every sportsmen. Not every visiting sports- 
year amounts to a very considerable sum. man nor yet every resident of the Prov- 
It has been estimated that each of the 576 ince, is a member of a fish and game club 
non-resident hunters who visited the nor can all of either class afford to lease 
Province in 1913 spent on an average a private preserve. For the use of these 
$400. This would mean a total of $230,- individual sportsmen, it is planned to re- 
400 received by people of Quebec in one serve large tracts of fishing and hunting 
year for their game resources alone. territory, especially in the newer parts of 

That the above estimate of the amounts the Province, which will be open to all 
spent in this Province by non-resident anglers and hunters in the open season, 
sportsmen is far below the actual figures without fees of any kind to residents of 
may well be assumed when we take into the Province, except for tags for the ship- 
consideration the expenditure of one or ment of game; while the non-resident's 
two out of the hundreds of clubs leasing license fee will be the only charge upon 
fishing and hunting territories from the non-resident sportsmen. 
Province. • 

The Laurentian Fish and Game Club See Advertisements in this Issue. Ad- 
has expended very nearly $1,000,000 in vertisers report a bigger demand than last 
the Province, as will be seen by a state- season. Better order quickly. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



111 



PHEASANTS AND QUAIL. 

By Helen Bartlett, With a Note by the Editor. 



Miss Helen Bartlett, a skillful game breeder, 
in a letter to Forest and Stream, says : "Read- 
ing in your last issue, I find a letter from Mr. 
Griffith, Columbus, Ohio, dated April 10th, in 
■ which he gives the views of General Speaks, 
the game warden of Ohio, on the subject, 'Is 
the Mongolian pheasant a menace to the native 
game birds of the State, especially the quail?' 
I feel that it is due you that I should give you 
the facts within my knowledge on this propo- 
sition. 

"I am no doubt the largest and most suc- 
cessful raiser of game birds and quail in this 
part of the country. My Ringneck and Mon- 
golian pheasants are penned in compartments 
fenced with two-inch poultry netting. These 
pens, holding the pheasants, run in a square 
about a field that we use for general gardening. 
My quail are turned loose in this garden field. 
They are not pinioned and their wings are not 
clipped. They come and go from the garden 
at their pleasure. We are accustomed to feed- 
ing them in the evening, and a great many of 
them always gather in from the outside alfalfa 
and other fields of the farm for the sweets 
that we throw to them. 

"In going from their garden, they must fly 
over or run through the pheasant pens, and as 
a consequence they usually pass through the 
pens, because they are averse to flying when 
running or walking will accomplish their pur- 
pose. They frequently remain in the pens with 
the pheasants all day. There is not a time 
when I go into the pheasant pens but what I 
find quail in some of them. I have never 
known a quail to be hurt by a pheasant and I 
have never known a pheasant to attack one. 
They eat together and appear to be either on 
the most friendly terms or indifferent to each 
other. 

"These statements of mine can be verified, 
if you desire to have them verified, by the Hon. 
Wm. R. Oates, Commissioner of Fish and 
Game of the State of Michigan, and by his 
deputies, Messrs. Jones, Hunter and Condon, 
who recently visited my place and spent a 
pleasant half day with me among the birds. 
Mr. Oates on that occasion stated to me that 
it was indeed a convincing surprise to him, 
after all he had read on the subject, to see the 
pheasants and the quail in such close and peace- 
ful association." 

Miss Barlett writing to The Game 
Breeder says : 

"As to the quail. I have reference to 
the Blue Valley quail. I have one partic- 
ular pen about 40 feet by 100 feet con- 
taining 15 Ringneck hens; it is sodded 
with white clover and I often see from 



four to ten or twelve quail in this pen. 
They eat of Spratts game food and the 
grains given at night. I often put out 
"corn bread" crumbled fine and this, they 
devour readily, I think because it always 
has sugar in it and it is the corn bread I 
termed "sweets" in the letter you refer 
to. I have never seen a pheasant mo- 
lest them in any way. They seem to 
like them and even during the breeding 
season the quail and male Ringnecks 
eat side by side off of the same board. 
I am sure if there was any tendency to 
be quarrelsome the quail would not fre- 
quent the pheasant pens, and some time 
we would see the results of such en- 
counters." 

We had a somewhat similar experi' 
ence at the preserve of The Game Breed- 
ers' Association on Long Island, N. Y. 
Some quail which had been placed on 
arrival in an old hen house soon ap- 
peared to be affected by a disease and 
some died. I immediately ordered the 
birds liberated and many of them 
remained in and around the garden back 
of a large pheasant pen. The quail soon 
after liberation seemed to be entirely free 
from the complaint which had begun to 
decimate them. 

I often saw quail in the pheasant pen 
and when alarmed they took wing and 
flew through the overhead wire much to 
my surprise, since the openings were just 
large enough for a quail to pass through 
with its wings closed. The birds whirred 
up to the openings evidently closed their 
wings as they passed through the small 
openings, then the whirring continued. 
Upon one occasion when I was standing 
near the pen with a visitor to the preserve 
he noticed the quail and I told him they 
could fly out through the wire netting 
over the pen. He expressed surprise at 
this but a few moments later, when our 
backs were turned, a quail which we had 
been observing took wing, whirred up to 
the wire and made it ring as it passed 
through. We turned quickly just as the 



112 THE GAME BREEDER 

whirring began again and saw the quail ous opinions on the subject were collected 

fly on from the roof of the pen. by Capt. Alex. Maxwell and published 

The only record I have of pheasants in his book on Partridges and Partridge 

annoying quail is a statement made to me Manors. Some of these opinions were 

by a farmer on a preserve in New Jersey published in The Game Breeder, 
who said he had seen the pheasants re- ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^_ 

peatedly, chasmg quail ma corn field Club told me he had a large 

down one row and up another. Game ^ i r m i • i r j 11 -^i 

keepers seem to think it is not wise to ^^^^ of quail which fed regularly with 

have too many pheasants on partridge his pheasants and that he had never ob- 

rearing grounds and some believe they served any disturbances. He had often 

disturb the nesting partridges. Numer- seen the birds associated. 



MUSK GRASSES AND DUCKWEEDS. 

Second Paper. 

By W. L, McAtee. 

[The Bulletin on "Eleven Important Wild-duck Foods" issued by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture is especially interesting to the owners of wild duck farms and preserves. Mr. 
McAtee has performed a public service in recording many of the foods eaten by wild ducks. 
We hope the bulletin may be followed by one on mast as a food for game and that Mr. McAtee 
can tell some of our readers wherethey can purchase acorns and other mast. There seems to be 
a demand for this food. — Editor.] 

Musk Grasses. ganized algae that do so. They are at- 

Parts of musk grasses (algae, Chara- tached to the bottom, and over it often 

ceas) have been found in the stomachs of form a fluffy blanket a foot or more in 

the following 14 species of ducks : Mai- thickness. Small round white tubers oc- 

lard, black duck, pintail, wigeon, gadwell, cur in numbers on the rhizoids (root-like 

green-winged and blue-winged teals, organs) of some species. The slender 

buffle-head, goldeneye, ruddy duck, little stems are jointed and bear at the joints 

and big bluebills, ringneck, and red- whorls of fine tubular leaves, which usu- 

head. The small tubers of these plants ally have a beaded appearance (fig. 1)^ 

are eaten in large numbers; more due to the reproductive organs growing 

than 1,100 were contained in the stomach there. These are of two sorts; the an- 

of one goldeneye and more than 1,500 in theridia, which are spherical and red 

that of a pintail. However, all parts of when mature, and the oogonia, which are 

musk grasses are eaten. Certain ducks ovoid and black, more or less overlaid 

spending the late autumn on Currituck with white. The oogonia correspond to 

Sound, North Carolina, were feeding ex- the seeds of higher plants, and are about 

tensively on these plants. Three-fifths half a millimeter in length, 

of the food of 70 little and 35 big blue- These plants are translucent and fra- 

bills taken in that locality in November, gile, dull green in color, and often 

1909, consisted of musk grasses. The (Chara) incrusted with lime. This has 

stomachs of 3 pintails collected in the given them one of their common names 

same locality in September contained on limeweed. Other names are stonewort, 

the average 52 per cent, of musk grasses, fine moss (Michigan), oyster grass and 

and of 2 in October, 90 per cent. nigger wool (North Carolina), and skunk 

Musk grasses belong to the great group grass (Massachusetts). The latter name 

of plants known as algae, which include and that here adopted for these plants, 

forms commonly known as frog spit, namely, musk grass, refer to a strong 

green slime, and seaweeds. Most of the odor given off by a mass of the plants 

musk grasses (Characeae) live in fresh when freshly taken from the water, 

water and are among the most highly or- Probably no part of the United States 



THE GAME BREEDER 



iia 




Fig. I— A Musk Grass (Chara). 

entirely lacks representatives of Chara 
or Nitella, our two genera of Characeae. 
They require lime, however, and hence 
reach their best development in regions 
where that mineral is plentiful. 

For transplanting, musk grasses should 
be gathered in quantity in late summer 
or fall, when some or all of the oogonia 
are mature. For shipment they should 
be packed in small units (as in berry 
crates) open to the air on all sides. This 
will prevent fermentation ; a little drying 
will not hurt. If they are to be trans- 
ported long distances, the package should 
be iced. For planting, bunches of the 
plant may be weighted and dropped to 
the bottom. Growth should appear the 
following summer. Musk grasses will 
grow on almost any kind of bottom, but 
it must be remembered that they will- 
not thrive permanently in the absence of 
lime. 

Duckweeds. 

Duckweeds are abundant only under 
special conditions, but these conditions 
exist in some of the favorite haunts of 
our wild ducks. In the still recesses of 
southern cypress swamps, where duck- 
weeds cover the entire water surface. 



these plants contribute to the support of 
all species of wild ducks. A statement 
of the duckweed content of two lots of 
stomachs collected at Menesha, Ark., in 
November and December will serve to 
show the importance of these plants in 
that locality. In the first lots were 8 
Mallards, and duckweeds composed an 
average of more than 62 per cent, of 
their stomach contents. The proportion 
in other species was as follows: Spoon- 
bill (1 stomach), 55 per cent; redhead 
(10) 50.3 per cent; and little bluebill 
(6), 8.33 per cent. In the second lot 
were 64 Mallards, and they had eaten 
duckweeds to the average extent of more 
than 49 per cent. Fifteen ringnecks had' 
consumed on the average 21.7 per cent, 
each, and two wood ducks, 95 per cent. 
In the woodland ponds also of the North- 
ern States duckweeds abound. Here 
in the breeding season the wood duck 
still manifests its preference for these 
little plants. Some stomachs are filled 
exclusively with tTiem, thousands being 
present. 

Duckweeds are relished by most of our 
ducks and have been found in the stom- 
achs of the following species additional! 
to those above mentioned: Pintail, gad- 
well, black duck, wigeon, blue-winged 
and green-winged teals, and big bluebill. 
As duckweeds sink at the approach of 
cold weather, they are available in the 
North during only the warmer months. 
In the South, however, they remain at 
the surface practically all the year. 

The duckweeds most commonly, seen 
are the green disks (sometimes more or 
less tailed on one side, fig. 2, a, b, c, d) 
which cover the surface of quiet and 
usually shaded waters. These disks are 
really leaves, the plants being reduced 
to a leaf, with one or a few roots on 
the under side. Duckweeds multiply 
largely by budding, and the parent plant 
and offsets often clin^ together in clus- 
ters. Individual plants vary in size from 
one-twelfth to three-fourths of an inch 
in diameter. 

Two genera of duckweeds lack roots. 
One of these {Wolffia, fig. 2, e, f), con- 
tains the smallest " flowering plants. 
These appear as green granules, one 
twenty-fourth of an inch or less in diam- 



114 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Fig. 2.— Duckweeds: a, b, Spi'rodela; c, d, Lerrma: e, f, Wolffia: g, h, 
Wolfflella, 



eter, and are often abundant among other 
duckweeds or about the margins of lakes 
and ponds. When the hand is dipped 
into the water large numbers of the 
plants adhere to it. They look like 
coarse meal, except for their green color, 
and feel like it, so that a good name for 
them would be water meal. 

The other genus of rootless duck- 
weeds {Wolffiella) consists of strap- 
shaped plants (fig. 2, g, h), narrowed at 
one or both ends. They are from one- 
fifth to three-fifths of an inch in length 
and commonly cohere in radiate bodies 
or in large masses of less definite struc- 
ture. 

Duckweeds are known also as duck's 
meat, water lentils, and seed moss. The 
latter term, in fact, is used in Arkansas 
to cover all components of the vegeta- 
tion of the water surface. Besides duck- 



weeds, this mass includes that green or 
red, velvety, mosslike plant, Azolla caro- 
liniana, and the branching straplike liver- 
worts, Ricciella. Both of these are eaten 
by waterfowl along with the duckweeds, 
but being less plentiful are of minor 
importance. 

Most of the species of duckweeds are 
wide ranging. Of the single-rooted kind 
{Lenvna, fig. 2, c, d), three species occur 
throughout the United States, two others 
are confined to the southern part, and one 
to the eastern. The one many-rooted 
species {Spvrodela, fig. 2, a, h), is of 
universal distribution. The granule-like 
rootless forms {Wolffia, fig. 2, e, /), so 
far as known, are confined to the eastern 
half of the country, and the straplike 
rootless species {Wolffiella, fig. 2, g, h) 
to the southeastern quarter. 

The seeds of duckweeds are minute 
and seldom mature. The plants, there- 
fore, must be transplanted bodily. There 
is no difficulty about this, for if they 
are not crushed or allowed to ferment or 
dry, duckweeds are perfectly at home 
from the moment they are placed in a 
new body of water. Fermentation may 
be prevented by shipping in small units 
freely exposed to the air. Plants which 
are to be transported a long distance 
should be iced. 

It is useless to put duckweeds in large 
open bodies of water. They thrive best 
in small pools and ditches where the 
water surface is rarely disturbed. In 
ponds entirely surrounded by forest 
growth and wooded swamps, duckweeds 
also abound, but they are equally at home 
in small pools and other openings among 
the reeds and sedges of marshes. They 
are strictly fresh-water plants. 



A LETTER FROM TENNESSEE. 

C. LOVETT. 



I never like to estimate how many 
birds I am going to raise. The inclosed 
picture will lend emphasis to my remark. 
It was taken on a rearing field in Colo- 
rado after a fifteen-minute cloudburst. 
We had just finished rescue work. You 



will note the coops floating upside down 
and the hens perched on top to prevent 
drowning. It is only one of many un- 
expected incidents encountered in game 
preserving. 

I can raise pheasants and other game 



THE GAME BREEDER 



115 






Rearing Field After Cloudburst. 



Tiirds but I do not feel able to write 
about them. I have not so much time 
to devote to the pheasants, as I have 
other duties to attend to. 

The Tennessee sportsmen are just be- 
ginning to realize that something else 
besides the passage of new laws by the 
legislature is needed to check the rapid 



decrease of their game birds. I am 
fully satisfied from my experiences with 
small numbers that the bobwhites can 
be propagated successfully if given 
proper attention in the Southern States. 
I hope to see the experiment tried out 
in the near future by the State game 
warden. 



GRAY PARTRIDGES IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA. 



English and Asiatic Partridges. 

It has become a well established cus- 
tom to replenish the home stocks of part- 
ridges from Belgium, Germany and Hun- 
gary, In all likelihood these sources will 
not be available for the next few years 
and proprietors and tenants must take 
the best means they can of keepng up 
their head of game. 

For some time partridge rearing has 
been conducted with much success. The 
tasks of hatching are entrusted to any 
light variety of domestic fowls capable 
of close setting. The youngsters are 
gradually introduced to a male adult of 
their own species, who eventually takes 
full charge of them and marches them 
ofif to their natural habitats. 

It has been suggested that the lerwa 
partridges of Asia might prove excellent 



substitutes for Belgians and Hungarians 
so far as turning-down purposes are 
concerned. They are handsome birds 
with upper parts black, striped with 
gray, and feet and bills red. They feed 
principally on the tender shoots of plants 
and once on the wing they are capital 
fliers. Many naturalists are of the opin- 
ion that they would do admirably in this 
country (England). 

Another foreigner which the Hon. 
Walter Rothschild strongly recommends 
for importation is the bearded partridge, 
the home of which is in Siberia. It is 
to be feared, however, that nothing can 
be done in the way of introducing 
strange birds from abroad until the war 
is over. — Shooting Times and British 
Sportsman. 

It is difificult and almost impossible to 



116 



THE GAME BREEDER 



get gray partridges to be turned down 
in America on account of the war. One 
of our advertisers had several thousand 
birds shipped to Rotterdam but could 
not get them shipped to America and 
the birds were sent back to Austria. 

Perhaps some of the larger dealers 
may be able to get the lerwa partridges 
and the bearded partridges from Asia to 
fill the big State orders and the many 



orders irot^L clubs and individuals. 

It will not be long, we firmly believe,., 
before quail will be produced abundantly 
in the States which permit such industry 
and our readers can get these birds tO" 
liberate on their farms. It is high time 
that we produced these birds as abund- 
antly and as cheaply as the gray part- 
ridges are produced in Belgium, Ger- 
many and Hungary. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Although the season was somewhat 
late reports coming to the Game Conser- 
vation Society indicate that hundreds of 
thousands of eggs were sold and that the 
number of ducks, pheasants, and quail 
reared this season will be several times 
as large as it was last year. We hope 
to publish some fairly accurate figures 
later showing the number of eggs sold. 

Next season we predict that many of 
the State game officers will be in the 
market for wild ducks and duck eggs. 
They are just beginning to learn that wild 
fowl are about the easiest game birds to 
rear and that very small waters can be 
made to yield wild ducks abundantly. 
Our readers may anticipate big sales of 
wild ducks and eggs since many new 
clubs are forming and many individuals 
will start duck breeding for sport and 
for profit on their country places. 

The opening of the New York market 
to the sale of game produced by breed- 
ers in other States will give a great im- 
petus not only to the breeding for profit 
but also to the breeding for sport. Those 
who rear ducks for shooting had in many 
cases more than they could possibly use. 
They should, of course, sell the food 
they produce in the best market and when 
they find that such sales will pay the ex- 
penses of the shooting they will of course 
breed abundantly. 

Several of our advertisers in the East- 
ern States sold hundreds of wild duck 
eggs to go to California. We are prom- 
ised reports of the results of the hatching 



and we await these with interest. One- 
preliminary report says the eggs arrived: 
in good condition and that no trouble 
was anticipated. 

Our mail is getting to be tremendous | 
and some days we have difficulty in hand- " 
ling it. We know all of our readers are 
interested in the work of others and we ■ 
hope they will send us notes of their ex- 
periments ; notes of their failures as well 
as of their successes. Miss Mary Wil- 
kie's account of the White Leghorn' 
which "gobbled up" her young bob- 
whites, which was published in the June 
issue, should be a warning to others not 
to let barnyard hens eat young quail. 
We all have a big lot to learn and the 
exchange of views in The Game Breeder- 
promises to make this department espe- 
cially interesting in the future. Mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to send us- 
interesting notes early and often. 

The supply department has sold a big 
lot of wire, traps and other appliances. 
Hereafter this department will be con- 
ducted by Mr. F. T. Oakes, who will en- 
deavor to see that readers of the maga- 
zine get the best appliances at the lowest 
prices. There has been a good sale for 
egg boxes, turners, pole traps, etc. 

The trout breeders report this industry 
as flourishing and profitable. Many say 
they can not fill their orders and for this 
reason they do not advertise. The big 
reduction in the cost of identification! 



THE GAME BREEDER 



117 



tags, properly provided for by the New 
York legislature, will reduce the cost of 
trout in the New York markets or it 
may increase the profits of the breeders 
"because there are not enough trout to 
fully supply the demand. It seems likely 
the prices will remain up for a year or 
two since the demand is increasing. 

A number of new bass breeders have 
started breeding black bass and these, 
like the trout breeders, find the industry 
profitable, without advertising. We often 
have requests for both trout and bass 
and we hope it will not be long before 
the number of breeders is large enough 
to supply the demand for these desirable 
fish and that the breeders will let our 
readers know that they have fish to sell. 

Many elk and deer breeders who have 
these animals to sell complain that they 
cannot sell the meat they produce in the 
best market. Much venison is imported 
from foreign countries and it is absurd 
to prevent American deer farmers from 
selling in the best market and to compel 
the people to send their money abroad. 

Towards the end of the season the 
prices for pheasant and ducks eggs went 
up instead of down. A few breeders 
who sold their eggs for fifteen and twen- 
ty dollars per hundred easily could have 
obtained twenty-five and even thirty dol- 
lars per hundred had they not adver- 
tised them at lower prices. Some of the 
largest breeders quickly sold all the eggs 
they could supply and we heard of good 
sized checks being returned because the 
orders for eggs could not be filled. Many 
pheasant eggs were sold as late as June 
at $25 per hundred. We predict that 
although hundreds of thousands more 
€ggs will be offered next season the prices 
will remain up. 

A number of the State game officers 
have been urging the people to have pri- 
vate fish ponds and to breed all species 
of fish food in suitable waters. Many 
private fish ponds have been stocked. 
Wild ducks are as easily handled as fish 
are and they have been found to be in- 
teresting and profitable. The State game 
officers should issue bulletins telling the 



people how to breed wild fowl on small 
waters. 

The Spratts Patent Limited, the Amer- 
ican dealers in game foods, have report- 
ed to the Game Conservation Society 
that their sales of wild duck foods have 
largely increased, indicating that the new 
industry is growing rapidly. It is only a 
few years since it became known in Eng- 
land that by using the proper foods it 
was an easy matter to rear wild ducks. 
The Spratts have sent us the names of a 
number of game keepers for whom we 
secured employment. 




Dutchess Co., N. Y. Pheasants. 

• 

A Game Census. 

The Game Breeder wishes to obtain 
detailed information about the number 
of deer and other game mammals and 
about the wild turkeys, quail, grouse, 
pheasants, wild fowl and other game 
birds owned by game breeders in the 
United States and Canada. The census 
of deer and elk in game farms, parks and 
preserves and the census of wild tur- 
keys, pheasants, wild ducks, and other 
hand-reared game birds can be made very 
accurately; the census of quail, grouse, 
and other birds, and deer and other 
mammals, reared by breeders in a wild 
state on game farms and preserves can 
be made fairly accurately. 

One of our readers, for example, 
writes that he had at the end of the 
shooting season, one hundred and forty- 
three covies of quail vnthin the limits of 
his grounds ; that the average number 
(^Contivued on pn^e i2r.) 



118 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^f Game Breeder 

Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 
NEW YORK, JULY, 1915 

TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

Telephone, Beekman 8685. 



CANADIAN CLUBS. 

The Canadian Province of Quebec 
properly leases shooting and fishing 
rights to clubs and individuals. Many- 
citizens of the United States and of the 
other provinces of Canada are members 
of these clubs which properly look after, 
protect, and in some cases propagate, the 
game and game fish and see that they 
are always abundant. 

The Supreme Court has decided that 
the right of fishing in inland waters be- 
longs to the owners of the lands in front 
of, or through which such waters flow. 
The unsettled territory of the Province 
of Quebec is enormous and notwith- 
standing the fact that over five hundred 
leases have already been granted to 
sportsmen, there are thousands of miles 
of good sporting territory still available 
for private preserves. There are besides 
vast areas where the public, resident and 
non-resident can shoot and fish and the 
shooting and Bshing on these lands and 
waters are benefitted, we are told, by 
the protection afforded to the game and 
fish by the clubs. 

Many readers of The Game Breeder 
are members of one or more of these 
Canadian clubs and we hope to interest 
them in breeding wild ducks on the club 
grounds. Easily they can make the 
ducks very abundant and by housing a 
few stock birds in winter they always 
can have breeding stock in the spring. 
It would be a good plan after the ducks 



are well established to band some of 
them and let them go South for the 
winter. No doubt many of them will 
return safely to nest beside attractive 
ponds where food is made plentiful. 
Some of our readers who let their ducks 
go South for the winter report that 
many return in the spring. We shall 
publish a number of illustrated articles 
about the attractive clubs and preserves 
in the Province of Quebec. 



HARMONY. 

The Game Breeder is growing. New 
members join the Game Conservation 
Society daily and we often wonder how 
they heard about it when their applica- 
tions and the money comes in the mail. 

The interest taken in the work of the 
society by prominent scientific men; the 
requests from libraries and scientific as- 
sociations for the publication of the 
society and the prompt notices which are 
received when for any reason a copy 
of the magazine does not reach a mem- 
ber, all indicate a gratifying interest in 
our work. 

We are pleased to observe that the 
National Association of Audubon So- 
cieties has created a department of ap- 
plied ornithology, which is intended to 
encourage the profitable breeding of the 
wild food birds as well as to encourage 
the practical care and protection of the 
song birds and the smaller insectivorous 
birds which, of course, should not be 
killed because they are not good to eat. 

We are pleased to observe that the 
American Game Protective Association 
has given some attention to game breed- 
ing and that it favors it. 

The Game Conservation Society does 
not give as much attention to the non- 
edible species of birds as the Audubon 
Association does, but it is interested in 
these birds and is aware that they are 
tremendously benefitted by the practical 
protection given to the edible species. 

We are pleased to observe that the 
many game protective associations, 
formed to secure restrictive laws in- 
tended to save the game, no longer op- 
pose the activities of the game breeders 
and rapidly thev are becoming aware 



THE GAME BREEDER 



119 



that the places where game is produced 
in big numbers are beneficial to the sport 
in which they are interested because such 
places tend to restock vast neighbor- 
hoods. 

There was some friction at the start. 
All of the game law enthusiasts did not 
take kindly to the activities of the game 
breeders. Some were afraid that pub- 
lic sport might be hampered in some 
way._ It is now well known that the 
opening of many of the posted farms 
where no_ shooting was permitted, and 
the breeding of vast quantities of game 
has been highly beneficial to the public 
and that the people are becoming more 
friendly to sport now that they are be- 
ginning to eat game. 

It is gratifying to observe that har- 
mony prevails. All are in favor of 
"more game" and such little dififerences 
as may remain are mere matters of de- 
tail which will be worked out har- 
moniously during the next year. The 
opening of the New York market to the 
sale of game produced by industry in 
other States is the most important un- 
finished business on the "more game" 
calendar. This we are assured will be 
attended to promptly. The claim is now 
niade by those who opposed the Machold 
bill, that they simply were opposed to the 
form of it and not to the idea. 

Mr. Machold and others present will 
remember the proposition made at the 
hearing to change the form to suit any 
opposition. It is now understood this 
will be done as it could have been done 
at the time. 

We are glad to announce that the 
Game Conservation Society, The Audu- 
bon Society, The American Protective 
Association and all the rest now ap- 
pear to be perfectly harmonious. As 
we have said before there is honor 
enough for all. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 
This Sounds Good. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I am much pleased with the magazine. 
I raise a large number of pheasants and 
quail annually and find there is a good 
profit in doing so for the market. I am 



doing all in my power to encourage it in 
this State. 

California. O. B. Finch. 

Good for you! 

Proposed Constitutional Amendment. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

Why not have the State Constitution 
amended so as to provide that not more 
than 118 game laws creating new crimes 
shall be enacted in any one year in New 
York State. I believe the highest num- 
ber of laws relating to game introduced 
in any State thus far is about 100, in 
one season. One hundred and eighteen 
therefore would seem to be a liberal al- 
lowance for those who enjoy the game 
law lobby and the limitation seems rea- 
sonable. 

A Rural New Yorker. 

[We see no objection to the proposed amend- 
ment since there should be some limit to mak- 
ing game laws. We insist, however, that these 
laws shall be kept off the farms where game is 
produced by industry — otherwise there will be 
no industry and the game will be "protected 
off the face of the earth," as the distinguished 
naturalist, Dr. Shufeldt, has well said. — 
Editor.] _ 

Editor Game Breeder: 

There are many reasons why I am 
in favor of such a law as you propose. 
It does not seem right that a man who 
has no time to hunt must go without 
even a taste of game bird or game fish 
unless he is willing to break the law 
or get some one else to break the law by 
selling him game. The present law 
seems to me to put a standing premium 
on the evasion of law in this respect. I 
believe there is any amount of game sold 
indirectly. There are no accounts kept 
and no direct payment, but both par- 
ties to the transaction trust each other 
fully and know that recompense will be 
given in due time. 

E. R. H. 

Connecticut. 

This is quite true. There are many 
people throughout the country who like 
to eat game. There are various ways 
by which they can procure it from local 
gunners, compensating them later, in 
some manner. I once, thoughtlessly, 
asked a local gunner who was showing 



120 THE GAME BREEDER 

«ne some rufifed grouse shooting to let farm or an automobile to a roll of wire 

me have the birds he shot. He regretted or a pole trap. This service is free to 

to inform me they had been spoken for members of the Game Conservation So- 

t>y a lady who was to give a dinner to ciety. The department can save money 

some friends. The temptation to forget for them in any transaction, 

the game laws is always present. , 

* The Game Conservation Society. 



Selecting the Ground. ^ brief statement of its organization, 

It is important in selecting the ground object and membership, 
for a game farm or preserve that it be The Game Conservation Society which 
visited in the spring or summer. In the has been conducted as a somewhat 
winter the land may be covered with loosely organized syndicate of enthusias- 
snow and it may be impossible to deter- tic game breeders has been incorporated 
mine its fertility and suitableness for the in order that its important work can be 
rearing of pheasants or other game. The carried forward with more efficiency, 
game farm or preserve should be started The charter of the association is a 
in the summer or early fall since there broad one and permits the association to 
is much to be done in the way of mak- conduct a game farm, make experiments 
ing enclosures, securing appliances and in game breeding and carry on an educa- 
the stock birds should be purchased early tional campaign, publish books, pamph- 
and introduced into their new home if lets and magazines, etc. 
they are expected to breed well the fol- The principal publications of the so- 
lowing spring. ciety will for the present be The Game 

It is important to know what one can Breeder and certain books about game 

legally do. No one should think of and game breeding already issued and in 

buying land in Rhode Island, for exam- preparation. 

pie, so long as State game officers per- The officers of the society are: 

sist in arresting game farmers because President, Dwight W. Huntington ; vice- 

they have stock birds, legally obtained, president, A. A. Hill; treasurer, F. R. 

in their possession. In Michigan per- Prixotto; secretary, John C. Hunting- 

mits are issued to breeders permitting ton. 

them to have birds in their possession The stock of the society is $10.00 per 

but we are informed they cannot sell the share. 

food they produce. In Ohio a new law Subscribing members pay $1.00 per 

permits the profitable breeding of pheas- year and receive the magazine. The 

ants and the State is a good one for Game Breeder, 

pheasant breeders only. Contributing members pay $5.00 and 

Massachusetts, Vermont, New York, $10.00 per year and are entitled to have 

New Jersey, Indiana, Oklahoma, Colo- 10 and 20 copies of the magazine sent 

rado, California, Ohio and some other to persons named by the contributors. 

States now have liberal laws which per- Life members of the society pay $100 

mit the profitable breeding of all or sev- each. 

eral species of game. These States have Donors — The society receives dona- 
capable and intelligent State game offi- tions from persons wishing to aid the 
cers. cause generally or in any particular local- 

Our supply department is prepared to ity. The amounts received are expended 

advise purchasers about the desirability in educational campaigns usually in 

of many localities, the attitude of the sending a large number of copies of the 

residents towards game breeders, etc., magazine to a particular State or locality 

and it can actually put intending pur- where it is desired to secure legislation, 

chasers in the way of securing desirable The society needs funds to employ coun- 

properties. The department soon will be sel to appear before legislative com- 

«equipped to furnish everything from a mittees and in certain court cases in 



THE GAME BREEDER 121 

which the society and its members are Audubon Association under which we 

interested, can send them to any of our readers who 

The society favors protective laws in- will send us a 2-cent stamp for mailing 

tended to save the remnants of wild each bulletin. 

game where such game still occurs, but The object of the bulletins is to en- 
it is especially interested in seeing that courage game breeding and, as our read- 
the restrictive laws do not interfere with ers are aware, the National Association 
or prevent the profitable breeding of all of Audubon Societies now takes as much 
species of game and fish. interest in this subject and in securing 

The society has done much and its sane game laws, encouraging game breed- 
members promise to do much more in '^S> as we do. It is a graceful act on 
the way of organizing game breeding ^he part of the Audubon Association to 
associations and game shooting clubs. It P.^^^^^t us to offer these two good bulle- 
is especially interested in the work of ^ms written by Mr. Job, whose good 
introducing the prairie grouse, quail and ^^^^ we noticed recently. Now that we 
other indilenous game to places where ^^.^, ^" P""^"^ squarely together there 
they have become extinct and where they ^^" F^f^ ^^ "^-'Iu^T^a "^^^ 
can be made profitably plentiful. ^^^^ ^^^°^^ kno wn m the l and. 

The Game Conservation Society is in * 
no way opposed to the American Asso- (Continued from page 117.) 
ciation or the other game protective as- ^^ ^irds in each covey is about fifteen, 
sociations. Representing as it does the g^^^^ ^he birds are properly looked after, 
interests of sporting and commercial ^^^^^j^ ^3 controlled and food is -sup- 
breeders The Conservation Society de- jj^^ j^ ^-^^^^^^ there should be at least 
votes its_ energies exclusively to those ^j^ ^^ ^j ^t thousand quail on this 
engaged m the new industry and to see- ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ i„ of the season 
ing that it IS not interfered with or pre- °g^|. £^|j 
ventea. ^ ^ \Ye desire to have reports from all 

The chief object of the society is to members of the Game Conservation So- 
make America the biggest game produc- ^j^^ ^^out the number of deer and birds 
ing country m the world and it is pleas- ^hey own at the end of the present breed- 
ing to observe that this object rapidly ■ ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^13^ ^3 ^^out the 
is being obtained. The Game Conserva- ^^^^ ^^^ ^irds owned by their neighbors, 
ion Society works hand in hand with ^-^^^ practically all of the owners of 
the Economic Department of the Na- j^ America are subscribing mem- 
tional Association of Audubon Societies §^^3 ^f ^he Game Conservation Society, 
and It IS pleased to give credit to all ^^^ ^^^3^3 ^f ^^e game owned by breed- 
associations which show any interest in ^^3 •„ ^he United States and Canada will 
the industry of game breeding. ^e very accurate. _ We wish all of our 

, readers to send in reports stating the 

number of breeding fowls and deer they 

Worth Having. own and the number of young on hand 

The National Association of Audubon J" the month of August. A special mail 

Societies has issued two good bulletins : will be sent out to special reporters for 

(1) The Propagation of Upland Birds; the survey of the field in all parts of the 

(2) The Propagation of Wild Water- country, but we hope our readers will 
fowl. Both are beautifully illustrated, take an interest in this census and that 
The picture of wild geese is from a they will send in their reports without 
painting by Horsfall and is so good that further notice. The money expended an- 
we have decided to frame it for the wall nually by the Society for postage is large 
of The Game Conservation Saciety. and we hope our readers will bear this in 

These bulletins cost 25 cents each, but mind and report without waiting for spe- 

we have made an arrangement with the cial letters. If a large number of breed- 



122 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ers will report in response to this re- 
quest they will reduce the amount of our 
work and our expenses in connection 
with the game census materially. 

We shall be obliged to our readers if 
they will state if we may mention their 
names in connection with their reports 
or if they wish simply to have the 
amount of game they own included in 
our total estimates. We wish to have 
the number of each species stated and 
in no case will we publish the names of 
the owners unless permission is given to 
do so at the time the report is sent in. 

We have a general knowledge, of 
course, about what many hundreds of 
breeders are doing and about how much 
game they own. We know enough to 
know that our readers will be surprised 
when they read the total amount of 
game owned by breeders in the United 
States and Canada. 

We shall be obliged to State game offi- 
cers if they will send us an estimate of 
the total number of game mammals and 
birds owned by breeders within their re- 
spective States if they have or can pro- 
cure any such estimates. It should be 
an easy matter to have the wardens re- 
port the number of game animals owned 
in their district and it will be interesting 
to compare the State reports with the 
totals furnished by members of the Game 
Conservation Society. 

We request the State game officers, 
most of whom are subscribing members 
of the Game Conservation Society, to 
report, also, the number of game birds 
reared this season on the State game 
farms in the States which have State 
game farms. We would suggest that all 
estimates be made as early in August 
as possible. They should be addressed 

to THE GAME CENSUS, THE GAME 
BREEDER, 150 NASSAU ST., NEW YORK. 



Notes from the State Game 
Departments. 

Henry Rief, a State game warden of 
Washington writes: 

I have been engaged in the breeding 
of wild life for many years. I have 
made a life study of this and know of 
what you speak. 

It is absolutely necessary to propagate, 
consequently you are making a step in 
the right direction, but allow me to sug- 
gest that while advocating propagation 
you place reasonable safeguards around 
protecting game so that it will not open 
the gates for the poacher to go out in, 
the fields and destroy what is still left. 
This is an angle that should not be over- 
looked. I am with you on all of your 
good efforts. 

Game can be propagated in captivity 
as easily as domestic birds and animals. 
They are even more hardy than the do- 
mestic creatures, but at the same time 
ninety out of every hundred make a 
failure of them for the reason that they 
do not consider nature. Important 
things to consider are — first, cleanliness. 
Second — feed according to natural hab- 
its and prevent close confinement. If 
these are observed there is no reason 
why propagating game in captivity 
should not be a success. 



Editor Game Breeder : 

Your reader should have no difficulty 
in keeping at least fifty deer in a 200 
acre inclosure. This is a very conserva- 
tive number for a tract of that size. 

All our deer are the common Ameri- 
can white tail deer. We have sold a few 
from time to time as our herd became 
too large. 

E. I. Philbrick, 

Supt. Dept. Parks, 

Virginia, Minnesota. 



ilUliiitiiinHiiiiiMiii 



iititiiiiiuiiUl 




THE GAME BREEDER 



123 





A Gun Club in 
Your 

That's the 

HAND 
TRAP 

It will give you all the facilities of 
a regular Gun Club wherever you 
may be. Ashore or afloat, it's 
fascinating sport to shoot at "clays" 
thrown from a Du Pont Hand 
Trap. 

You'll find it's not just plain trapshooting. There is an added element of uncertainty 
to Hand Trap shooting that makes it just about as exciting as field shooting. The Hand 
Trap will throw an almost endless variety of targets. You're "some shooter" if you can 
hit half of them. 

The Hand Trap weighs but seven pounds and folds up to fit in your suitcase with 
targets and shells. If your dealer can't supply you, we will deliver postpaid for $4.00. 



Write for free booklets about trapshooting and use of 
Hand Trap. Address Dept. 345-S, 530 Du Pont Bldg. 



^ DU PONT POWDER CO., ^^^^^ j 



"Exhibit A." 

Recently we printed a cartoon on 
the cover of the magazine showing bob- 
white in a canary cage, in order to call 
attention to the attempt which has been 
made in some places to put our best game 
bird on the song bird list. Farmers have 
been urged to prohibit the shooting of 
this bird on account of its being bene- 
ficial to agriculture, but seldom are they 
told that the birds can be made and kept 
very plentiful and profitable provided 
they be properly looked after and pro- 
tected from their natural enemies. Shoot- 
ing paradoxical as it may seem, can be 
made to cause a rapid increase in the 
-number of the quail and many can be 
safely shot and sold every season. 

Recently the bag limit was nearly 
doubled on Long Island, N. Y. The 
quail shooting was very good last fall 
and promises to be even better next sea- 
son for the simple reason that the birds 



are properly looked after by sportsmen. 
Recently we printed the story of one 
of the Long Island shooting grounds 

Petitions have been circulated calling 
for the prohibition of quail shooting on 
Long Island and the enemies of sport 
seem determined to add Long Island to 
the list of places where the quail can 
not be shot at any time. Should they 
succeed it will be bad for the birds be- 
cause no one will look after them. 

Long Island should remain a good 
quail shooting ground in striking contrast 
to the places where the birds can not be 
shot at any time. 

We shall insist upon keeping Long 
Island open as "Exhibit A" (as the law- 
yers say) to be used in evidence when the 
attempt is made to put bobwhite on the 
song bird list in other states. 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



124 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No adveriisement accepted for Ices' 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



DOGS 



BEARHOUNDS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, BLOOD- 
HOUNDS. Fox, deer cat and lion hounds. Trained 
and young stock. 50-page illustrated catalogue 5-cent 
stamp. ROOKWOOD KENNELS. Lexington. Ky 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian -wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satitfacfion guaranteed or 
money refunded. Purchaier to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps .or coin . 

AIREDALES — THE GREAT ALL 'ROUvD DOG. 

Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent ; 
have puppies, grown dogs and brood matrons Send for 
large list. W. R. WATSON, Box 711, Oakland, Iowa. 

DOGS TRAINED AND BOARDED. BEST AR- 
ranged kennels in the South, located on 10,000 acres 
leased hunting grounds; forced retrieving taught dogs of 
any age ; my methods never fail ; thirtv years' experience 
JESS M. WHAITE, Cyrene, Decatur Co.. Ga. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS— THOR- 
oughbred Stock — Bred and raised on the James River 
and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost every day of the 
Duck Shooting Season. Dogs and puppies for sale. Just 
right to break this Fall. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS- 

Thoroughbred stock. Bred and raised on the James 
River and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost everyday 
of the duck shooting sea'^on. Dogs and puos for sale. 
4 fine female pupates, 6 months i.ld. nt $ n.nO each. Just 
right to break this season. JOHN SLgAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia. 

MISC£I<I^A.NEOUS 

RUFFED GROUSE WANTED, STATE PRICE. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WANTED— ACORNS. STATE PRICE PER BUSHEL- 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street' 
New York. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS— RAISED AND REGIS- 

tered in old Wisconsin. Eggs $1.25 per 12 ; birds f 1.50 
each. Excellent decoys. Order now. E. G. SHOWERS, 
Onalaska, Wisconsin. 

WANTED— COPIES OF THE GAME BREEDER FOR 
June, 1913; September, 1913 ; April, 1914; June, 1914; 
December, 1914. We will pay 20 cents per copy for a 
few copies of the issues named in good condition. THE 
GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street. N. Y. 

WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina^ 

WANTED— ACORNS. State price per bushel. M. TAN 
ENBAUM, 149 Broadway, New York City. 



LIV£ GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs lor sale; several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 

GET WISE-RAISE PHEASANTS FOR PASTIME. 
Profitable and fascinating. Send for prices. CON- 
NECTICUT FARMS PHEASANTRY, Union, Union 
County, N. J. ___^ . 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 

WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 

antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now— the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans.Wild Duoks, etc.. for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. ^^ 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display adrertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 

County, Pa. . 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. <'"" 

CASH PAID FOR PEA FOWLS. State age and sex. 
Will buy ■;oo Ring Necks, 100 Amherst, 100 Goldens, loo 
Reeves. State your best price. HELEN BARTLETT, 
Cassopolis, Michigan. ^ 

PEACOCKS. ALL KINDS OF PHEASANTS. WHITE 
African Guineas, for sale, pure blooded, non-related. I 
will buy Amherst, Reeves and Pea fowls. JOHN TAL- 
BOT, South Bend, Indiana. 9-i4-6m. 



Our Wild Fowl 
and Waders 

A Practical Book on Wild Duck 
Breeding for Sport or Profit. 

Fully Illustrated $1.50 



The Game Breeder 

ISO Nassau Street New York 



writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breader or sign your letters: "Yours for Mote Game' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



125 



FOR SALE — PEACOCK, each $6.00 ; MAMMOTH 
Flemish Rabbit $4.00 a pair at six months. Angora 
rabbit $3 00 a pair. Pigeons: silvered pouters $6.00 a 
pair, white fantails $2.00, white dragon $2.00, red homer 
$1 00. J. J. GAREAU, St. Roch I'Achigan. Quebec Can. 

PHEASANTS OF NINE VARIETIES; STOCK AND 
eggs. Ringnecks contractable by the thousand . DAISY 
FARM, San Lorenzo, California. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price. A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 

FOR SALE— ONE PET DEER, ONE YEAR OLD. 
Address ROY CLEWITT. Kerrick, Minnesota. 



GAM k,kee:p£r.s 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR SUPERINTENDENT— 

wanted by experienced man as above, 20 years' first-class 
■character in England and America. Understand raising 
of all kinds of Game and Ducks, training and management 
of Dogs, trapping of all kinds of Vermin. B, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

SUPERINTENDENT. — Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 years, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3,000 pheasants have been penned and 
20,000 raised yearly. Understand the raiting of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management of incubators, tasting 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit warrens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs. Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER— LIFE EXPERIENCED REARING 
land and water fowl, training and handling high class 
•shooting dogs, conditioning for shows. A-1 rearing jsup- 
pies, well up in veterinary, competent manager of club or 
private estate. Distance immaterial J. H. W., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

•GAMEKEEPER— WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January ist. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St.. 
New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly experienced in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; a6 years' experience. 
Can be highly recommended. R. J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder. 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION. UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F.,care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street, New York. 

EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 
Private Estate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to 
T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 
York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly understands Pheasant and Wild Duck 
raising, (will rear Pheasants by contract). Incubators, 
management of deer, rearing and training of dogs, vermin 
trapping. Well recommended. Address W. S., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 



GAME E,<mGS 

BOOK YOUR ORDER NOW FOR CHINESE RING- 
neck pheasant eggs, Oregon's famous game bird. $3.00 
per dozen, $20.00 per hundred. OREGON BIRD & 
PHEASANT FARM. Beaverton, Oregon. 



FINEST STRAIN OF ENGLISH RING-NECKED 
PHEASANT EGGS for sale during June; $5.00 per 
hundred, in lots of not less than 100 eggs Apply to 
DUNCAN DUNN, Superintendent, State Game Farm, 
Forked River, N. J. 

MALLARD DRAKES AND EGGS FOR SALE. E 
at the rate of $2.00 a setting. REDDEN QUAIL CL 
Paoli, Pennsylvania. 

GOLDEN AND RING-NECK PHEASANT EGGS 
for sale, cheap. CONNECTICUT FARMS PHEAS- 
ANTRY, Union, Union County, N. J. 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early delivery. $2.50 per setting 

of 15 eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthington, Minn. 

FOR SALE-PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
Golden and pure Lady Amh«rst. One pair year old 
hybrid birds for sale. E. R. ANDERSON, So. Hamilton, 
P. O., Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS IN JUNE, |i.8o PER HUNDRED. 
THOS. COWLEY GAME FARM, Mawdesley, Orms- 
kirk, England. 

ENGLISH RING-NECK PHEASANTS' EGGS FOR 
HATCHING, from strong healthy stock. $3 a setting. 
$23 a hundred. Miss HOPE PICKERING, Hope Poultry 
Farm, Rumford, R.I. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR DELIVERY IN MAY AND 
JUNE, $15 per 110 ; $125 per 1100. Guaranteed a0% fer- 
tile. Packed in dry wood will keep good for a month. 
ARTHUR DAVIS, The Pheasantries. Denner Hill, Great 
Wissenden, Buck, England (Associate Game Guild). 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
$8.00 per setting. ERNEST WOODER, Oxford Jet., 
Iowa 



PIGEONS 

BEST HOMERS AND CARNEAUX PIGEONS TIME 
and money can produce. Pictures and description free. 
Write NATIONAL SQUAB FARM, Itasca, Texas. 



GAME BIR.D.S "WANTED 

I AM IN THE MARKET FOR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

Practical Book on Duck Breeding 
for Sport and Profit 

$1.50 

The Game Breeder, 159 Nassau St. , N. Y. C. 



M. G. and F. G. L 

Can you guess it? 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours fo More Game." 



126 



THE GAME BREEDER 



THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands nneqnaled. 

Neio Edition Just Oat. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird doe subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 

Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, 11.50. Addri-ss 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



WILD DUCK EGGS 

from strong flying birds which were 
bred wild in a marsh. Original 
stock from The Game Breeders' 
Association. 

For prices write 

Dr. HENRY HEATH, Jr., 

ORIENT, L. I., N. Y. 



The Propagation 
of Wild Birds 

By HERBERT K. JOB 



PRICE $2.00 



We pay dcKvcry charges 



THE GAME BREEDER 

1 50 NASSAU STREET NEW YORK 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties." 

Wood Duck<;, Mandarins, Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bougHt NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 



Our Feathered Game - - $2.00 
Our Big Game - - - - 2.00 
The Game Breeder (for one year) 1,00 

$5.00 

Special Offer for This Month 

We will send the two books 

and 

for 



We will send the two books ^^ _ _ 
and the magazine for one year Jx flfl 



THE GAME BREEDER 
1^0 Nassau Street New York, N. Y. 



More Game, and Fewer Game Laws 



In writing to advertisers pleas* mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



127 



MALLARD EGGS 

FOR SALE 

From Hand Raised Wild Mallards 

on Free Range, Stock 

Unsurpassed. 

$25.00 per 100, in lots of a 100 

110 to the 100 

$20.00 per 100, in lots of 500 

110 to the 100 

$3.60 per setting of 15 Eggs 
A. SCOXX, Gamekeeper 

Froh-Heim Game Preserve 
FAR HILLS NEW JERSEY 




Mallard Eggs From Strong 
Flying Birds 

April Delivery 
$25.00 per hundred 

Later Deliveries 
$20.00 per hundred 

Orders booked and filled in the 
order in which they are received 

T. A. H. 

Care of 

THE GAME BREEDER 
150 Nassau St., New York 







THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring- Ducks hundreds of miles— my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year — also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh from their native haunts— 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I have the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. Mallards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write for My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 



Eggs and Pheasants 
For Sale 

We offer for immediate delivery. 
Silver, Golden, Lady Amhurst, Reeves, 
Elliott, Ringnecks, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Impeyan Pheasants. White 
and Blue Peafowls. Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails. S. C. Buff and Blue Orping- 
tons, R. I. Reds. 

WANTED 

Peafowl, Pheasants and Ducks 

White Peafowls, Black-shouldered or 
Java. In Pheasants any of Tragopans^ 
Firebacks, Cheer, Soemmering, Elliott^ 
Kalij White-crested Linneatus. Also 
Canvasback ducks. In writing, quote 
number, sex, lowest cash price. 

We will on receipt of 20 cents in stamps 
send colortype catalogue of pheasants. 

CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



128 THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop — a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated ducks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

'"Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially m America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly — and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finis, 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of D wight W. Huntington, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 



Pennsylvania Pheasantry and Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 




^-^^^^w- .-*^" 




Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 300 best 
Royal 8wans of Eiielaiid. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS. CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
n thousand Ringneckand fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have fiO a-cres 
of land entirely devoted to ray business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — It will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE, a Tract of land suitable 
for a game park or preserve. 
Contains 2500 acres, two lakes, trout 
streams, part cleared, balance wood- 
land. Timber alone is worth the 
price asked for the land^ 

This tract is well suited for a 
Game Breeding Association or Shoot- 
ing Club* It is located on the Dela- 
ware River, not far from Port Jervis. 

There are a number of buildings 
suitable for Club purposes* 

We have other properties adapted 
for Game Breeding Associations and 
Shooting and Fishing Preserves* 

For Particulars address 

W* G* LYNCH 

The W. G* Lynch Realty Co. 

Long Acre Building - - New York 




f.loo PerYear 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




Single Copies 10^. 





r^,u^ THE" 



QAHE 




VOL. VII. 



AUGUST, 1915 



No. 5 




The- Object of this riAGAziNE- is 
TO Make- Noeth America the- 5i6Gest 
Gahe Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 




Survey of the Field — Wild Fowl at Great Bend — Another Good 
Bulletin — Ruffed Grouse Breeding — Refuges — Pheasants and 
Quail — No Trespassing— Setters and Pointers — A Fair Compro- 
mise — Mink and Muskrats — A War Dog — More Pheasants. — More 
Tuna — Conservation in Minnesota. 

D. W. Huntington 



The Prairie Grouse - - - - 
A West Virginia Game Preserve. T3i 
Planting Trout Fry 



D. C. Beaman 

'crW.'M^kim 

W. L. McAtee 



Pheasant Breeding - v..^-^-~ - 

Eleven Important Wild Duck Foods 

Notes from Game Farms and^Preserves. \'^ 

Notes from The State Game Departments. 

Editorials— " In Captivity" Nonsense — A Big Mistake— Quail and 

the Audubon Society— Our PoUcy. 

Outings and Innings— Trade Notes — Book Reviews, etc., etc. 



./^; 



^. 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliillllllllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHHIIIIIIII Illlllllllllllllllll!!!lllll||^ 

pobuismed by ■ 

THE" GAME- C0N5EEVAT10N 50CIE:TY; Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.ij* r»Pj,v,j-/S 



HiiiriiiiHiriJiiiiiiuiiuiiiiiHirnniiiHniiiHnniHiiiHiinimmHniiiiiinuiiiniitiHtiiiinHUiH HniiiiiiiniiHiiimmiiiHnHiiHniiimi..i» 



IP 



,'A 



r 



There Is No Food Like 

PRATT'S 





It is the purest form of meat obtainable. SPRATT'S CRISSEL takes 
the place of ants' eggs and the natural insect food consumed by the 
birds in the free state, and for this reason is of great value to young and 
penned Pheasants. 

Game Foods Manufactured By Spratt's Patent are: 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 12 (For Pheasant, Partridge and 

Quail Chicks). 
SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 5 (For Young Pheasants). 
SPRATT'S PHEASANT FOOD No. 3 (For Adult Birds) 
SPRATT'S MASCOl (The most nourishing food obtainable). 
SPRATT'S PRAIRIE MEAT "CRISSEL" (Takes the place of Ants' 

Eggs and is a perfect substitute for insect hfe). 
SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MEAL (The best food for Ducklings). 




Sportsmen on hunting trips will do well not to 
forget to provide for the dog. Fifty or one 
hundred pounds of 

SPRATT'S DOG CAKES 

will take up little room and will furnish sufficient food in the most eco- 
nomical form, with the least possible expense for the entire trip. 

For dogs in the field where hard work is required, we manufacture a 
biscuit containing an extra large percentage of meat. 

Write for samples and send 2c stamp for "Dog Culture," containing valuable 
information regarding kennel management, rearing, etc. 

"Pheasant Culture" on receipt of 25c., "Poultrv Culture" on receipt of 10c. 

SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

(Factory and Chief Offices at NEWARK, N. J.) 



THE GAME BREEDER 129 



The Time To Advertise Game Birds Is NOW 

There will be a big demand for stock 
birds and those who send in their adver- 
tisements early will get the most business. 



Egg advertising should begin not later 
than October to get the best results 
next spring. 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please enter my name as a contributing memlber of The Game 
Conservation Society and send me its publication, THE GAME 
BREKDER, for one year. $1.00 enolosed. 

Name 

Street 

City ;.. 

State 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



130 THE GAME BREEDER 



Game Breeders' Supplies 



WIRE - COOPS - TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks^ Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. OAKES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or eggs 
In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



131 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 

Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 

The* Camp Cook Stove 



This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 

Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 

arge gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook Dobule Oven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. lo Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
N'o. 90 Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 

Ormond Ranges Loyal Victor Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves Victor Hotel Ranges 

Victor Gem Cook Elm Ranges 

Laundry Stoves Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 



Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

'Cauldrons 



Manufactured by 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2iid St., PHiladelpKia, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers plaese mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours iui More Game." 



132 



THE GAME BREEDER 




m 



GRAND PRIX 

The Highest of Honors 

"For MODERN Firearms and Ammunition'' 

Awarded to 

A JURY of Experts, making 
their final decision AT The 
Panama- Pacific Interna- 
tional Exposition, awarded the 

Grand Prix "Fo)- MODERN Firearms and 
Ammunition" to the Remington Arms- 
Union Metallic Cartridge Company in rec- 
ognition of the century of Progress 
evidenced in the up-to-the-minute Reming- 
ton-UMC products exhibited at the Big 
Fair — and found in the hands of alert 
Sportsmen the world over. 



There are awards and awards-the Panama- 
Pacific verdict is but one of a long line of 
similar honors that have come to Reming- 
ton-UMC from practically every country 
on the globe. BUT — the securest and 
most treasured of all Remington -UMC 
honors is found in the place ' 
which this Sign of Sports- 
men's Headquarters occupies in 
the minds and hearts of the 
Sportsmen of the World. ( 





^^^''•u.s.^tJ^ 



T^! Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July 9. 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME VII 



AUGUST/I9J5 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 5 



Wild Fowl at Great Bend. 

The Great Bend, Kansas, Tribune con- 
tains some good suggestions about the 
restoration of wild fowl in Kansas. 

There was a time when the Great Bend 
country was the greatest hunting ground and 
natural game preserve to be found any- 
where. * * * gy^ where are the game 
birds and animals that made this valley a 
hunter's paradise ? You answer that they have 
gone the way of the Indian and the buffalo. 
The Indian was given reservations in various 
parts of the United States and accorded pro- 
tection of the government and offered everv 
opportunity for his betterment. The buffalo 
has also received the protection of the law 
and efforts in various localities made to con- 
serve them by establishing ranches and pre- 
serves for their protection and propagation. 
But what of the wild fowl? Are they given 
any effective protection anywhere ? Can they 
be propagated here in the midst of modern 
civiHzation ? The sportsmen and game men of 
Kansas and the Middle West say yes and call 
attention to the wild bird farm of George J. 
Klein to verify the statement. 

Mr. Klein is a member of the Game 
Conservation Society and has reared and 
sold thousands of wild fowl. The Great 
Bend Tribune evidently is a wide-awake 
and enterprising newspaper and the copy 
containing the story about Mr. Klein 
contains many good half-tones which il- 
lustrate not only Mr. Klein's game farm 
but many other industries. We predict 
it will not be long before prairie grouse 
and quail are bred in large numbers and 
that the farmers and sportsrnen will find 
these birds very profitable as they are 
in many places throughout America. 
The quail now more than pay all the 
taxes on hundreds of thousands of acres 
where they are properly looked after be- 
cause it pays to do so. Kansas should 
have a game breeder's law similar to the 
laws in other States which have made 
game breeding profitable and the game 
abundant. 



Another Gogd Bulletin. 

The American Game Protective Asso- 
ciation has issued another good bulletin 
which contains reports from a number 
of State game officers showing a good 
stock of pheasants. There is a story 
about the visit ai Colonel Theodore 
Roosevelt to a Louisiana bird reservation 
which is illustrated by a picture of the 
Colonel examining a Royal Tern's egg 
and a snapshot showing a flight of the 
birds which have been disturbed by their 
distinguished visitor. Page three is de- 
voted to an announcement indicating 
that the association proposes to help keep 
up the interest in game breeding "in cap- 
tivity." We hope in time the association 
will not be opposed to the activities of 
members of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety who prefer to breed their game 
wild in protected fields. Hundreds of 
thousands of quail are now bred in this 
way by readers of The Game Breeder, 
and they are better birds in our opinion 
for sport and for profit than any birds 
bred "in captivity." The gray partridges 
abroad are reared most successfully wild 
in protected fields. Since the committee 
on breeding is made up of readers of 
The Game Breeder we will have a chance 
to talk to them from time to time and 
we have no doubt they will agree to 
abandon the "in captivity" idea which 
too often means disease, expense and 
failure when applied to certain species 
which are not easily hand-reared. 

Ruffed Grouse Breeding. 

The bulletin above referred to dis- 
cusses the desirability of ruffed grouse 
breeding and expresses the hope that this 
bird may be bred as the pheasants are. 
Grouse breeding abroad is highly suc- 
cessful, but the grouse are not handled 



134 



THE GAME BREEDER 



as the pheasants are, and we do not think 
they ever will be. They will be better 
birds if they are not. We know places 
in America where the grouse quickly 
have been made abundant in protected 
woods. It is well known to all game 
keepers that the removal of the checks 
to increase, which they term vermin, 
quickly will produce excellent results. 
We have been surprised recently at the 
results on a very small area. Another 
reader is conducting an experiment with 
the ruffed grouse on a large scale. His 
keepers are skillful and there can be no 
doubt about the result. For sporting 
purposes the wild bred birds are the best. 
We prefer them also -on the table. 

Refuges. 

The bulletin favors the increase in the 
number of refuges. As we have said we 
see no objection to this although we 
think there are enough posted farms to 
satisfy the demand for refuges. The 
country is big; we are not opposed to 
quiet refuges ; we have said we will favor 
them, but our preference is for the noisy 
refuge which produces a good head of 
game for sport every season. We are in 
favor, however, of anything and every- 
thing any one wants; all we ask is that 
if it is preventive it be kept off of the 
farms conducted by game breeders. 
*'Keep the game laws off of the farm" is 
one of our favorite expressions — farms 
which have game for sport or for profit. 

Pheasants and Quails. 

The old problem of pheasants and 
quail is discussed in the bulletin. A 
statement that the pheasants were driv- 
ing the quail from Rock Island (in the 
Mississippi) is discussed in a letter from 
Lieutenant-Colonel Geo. W. Burr, who 
says the quail have decreased in numbers 
on the island since the pheasants were 
introduced but this may have been due 
to trapping. He does not believe there 
is any real antagonism between the spe- 
cies. 

No Trespassing. 

We saw some years ago, in Ohio, a 
sign which read: "No Huntin and No 
Fotographin" on this farm. The spelling 



should suit the most ardent reformer. ^1 
The number and variety of the no tres- 
pass signs has increased rapidly in all 
of the States and it seemed that field 
sports were doomed until the "more 
game" movement began to put a little 
common sense in the law-books and a 
little life iii our languishing sport. It 
seems ludicrous that any one should have 
imagined that sport could be perpetuated 
simply by licensing gunners to shoot up 
the farms without permission, under the 
assurance that "the State owns the 
game." 

Setters and Pointers. 

We can remember the time when most 
of the dogs advertised were pointers and 
setters. A glance at the dog advertising 
pages in the New York Sunday papers 
and in the dog magazines now indicates 
that the number of setters and pointers 
advertised is small comparatively. Since 
grouse and quail shooting have been pro- 
hibited in some States and the tendency 
has been to prohibit sport everywhere it 
is not surprising that the demand for 
good sporting dogs has fallen off. Many 
hundreds of dogs are now used on the 
game preserves where the restrictions 
have been removed by game breeders' 
enactments and we predict a big revival 
of setter and pointer breeding now that 
field sports are to have a boom in 
America. 

A Fair Compromise. 

If the people of Canada can be shown 
that wild duck-breeding on privately 
owned marshes can be made profitable 
and that the markets can be supplied 
from such places possibly the market 
gunning on public waters might be 
stopped for a time as a protection 
to the new industry. No back yard| 
breeding "in captivity" will fill the' 
markets with game or even save the 
marshes from being drained. If there isi 
to be a compromise it should be a fairj 
one intended to encourage the clubs and] 
individuals to look after the ducks nest- 
ing wild and to keep the markets full' 
of them for at least six months every 
year. Any farm which has a marshy 



THE GAME BREEDER 



135 



pond of a few acres should produce a 
few hundred or a few thousand wild 
ducks by simply protecting the nesting 
fowl from ground and winged vermin. 
Reduce the checks to increase even 
slightly and the species quickly will in- 
crease in numbers to any amount. 

Of course breeding stock can be intro- 
duced to advantage in many places and 
there should be the most liberal provis- 
ions for trapping stock birds and for 
lifting eggs for purposes of propaga- 
tion. The eggs of canvas back ducks 
which might be gathered by the million 
from protected marshes will sell readily 
at $50 per hundred for some time to 
come. Let the people know that they can 
make a few hundred dollars a day by 
keeping the coyotes and the hawks from 
destroying the nesting fowl and their 
eggs and the people will gather and sell 
the eggs and see that many young fowl 
are reared for the markets. The ar- 
rest of the breeder for having a stock 
bird in his possession has not produced 
the best results in the United States. 
Liberality should be the rule in Canada. 

Minks and Muskrats. 

A reader sending the following clip- 
ping wishes to know if the State owns 
the minks and muskrats. Probably the 
breeder would answer as an Illinois deer 
breeder once did that, "This is a mis- 
take. The State does not own my ani- 
mals." 

J. E. Reeves & Co. have started what prom- 
ises to be one of the first muskrat and mink 
farms in Fond du Lac County. The plot se- 
lected is a tract of marsh land of thirteen 
acres in size and is situated between this city 
and North Fond du Lac on the east side of the 
street car line and north of the Princeton 
tracks. 

Three workmen are now busily engaged in 
constructing a fence that will reach to the 
bottom of the marsh and is for the purpose of 
keepmg the rats within the bounds. Accord- 
ing to a statement issued by J. E. Reeves it 
is the plan of the company to build a house 
next spring on the "farm" for the keeper. At 
present there are 150 rat houses on the place 
inclosed. 

The present plans of the company are not to 
disturb any of the rats until the "farm" has 
been established about one and a half to two 
years. 

Mr. Reeves also stated that he had allowed 
trappers to trap rats on the marsh for the 



past fifteen years and had not demanded an 
indernnity. At present several signs bearing 
the inscription "no trespassing" have been 
placed at various conspicuous places. 

A Non-beneficial Hawk. 

Mr. Pringle in "Twenty Years' Snipe 
Shooting," says: "A snipe getting up 
behind me I took a long snap shot at it ; 
it flew a little way and then towered, 
dying in the air about 100 ft. high, and 
as he was falling dead, a hawk swooped 
down and caught him in the air about 50 
ft. from the ground and carried him 
off." 

A War Dog. 

An English correspondent of the New 
York Herald says : 

British prejudice against Germany has been 
turned even against the kind of dog that bears 
"the unfortunate name of dachshund," com- 
plains a writer in the Daily Mail, who says : 

"May I protest against the cruel and sense- 
less manner in which some people are treating 
the unfortunate turnspit dogs because these 
poor dumb friends have been called by the 
German name of dachshund. These dogs, al- 
though very popular in Germany, are our old 
English turnspits, used in bygone days to turn, 
by means of a wheel, the roasting jack in the 
same way as the donkey at Carisbrooke Castle 
draws water from the well. On account of 
their name these poor dogs are now being 
treated not as enemy aliens to whom we are 
unpatriotically lenient, but most unjustly." 

Private !Fish Culture. 

The Sportsmen's Review prints the 
following about fish farming. It will not 
be long, we hope, before this good old 
magazine opens its pages to items about 
the game breeders' industry. It should 
remember that "more game" means more 
shooting and more shooting means more 
shooting dogs — more advertisements of 
course. 

A nev/ method of livelihood, as well as a 
new method of living, is afforded by fish farm- 
ing, which is a rapidly growing industry. It 
may be a lazy man's job, but for development 
beyond an addition to the family living, of 
course, it takes time and attention. A running 
stream or an acre of land can be made to earn 
more money than a well-tilled five-acre farm, 
says the People's Magazine. The national gov- 
ernment, as well as many states, through their 
fish commissions, not only give free instruc- 
tions in fish farming, but will also supply the 
young fish or eggs most likely to thrive best 
in the locality. But best of all, perhaps, is the 
recognition that farmers all over the country 



136 



THE GAME BREEDER 



are coming to, that a private fish pond is a 
splendid source of food supply. It was not 
long time ago when such a thing had not been 
thought of. Now generally there is a com- 
prehension that such a private pond costs little 
to maintain, and is almost sure to furnish far 
more fish than any one family can eat. The 
demand for fish adapted to this kind of pond 
culture is greater than the supply, and farmers 
enterprising enough to have ponds have no 
difficulty in selling the product. Many farmers 
sell eggs as well as fish to other farmers and to 
the government of state and nation. Private 
fishing clubs are a great aid in the same way. 
Fish can be shipped anywhere if they are kept 
cool and moist, and this makes it easy to find 
a market almost boundless in extent. But fish, 
of course, are subject to diseases that at times 
cause large losses, and the official fish service 
is at work constantly finding out these diseases 
and their remedies. Most of these diseases, it 
is said, come through impure water caused by 
contaminated streams. If the water is kept 
pure, the fish farmer has little cause for worry 
as to his "crop." 

More Pheasants. 

We wish to inform The Sportsmen's 
Review, Cincinnati, Ohio, that Ohio is 
to have "more pheasants." This is offi- 
cial. The license to breed the birds and 
to shoot, sell and eat costs only 50 cents 
and a capable state game officer will 
supervise the new industry. Our read- 
ers are sending thousands of eggs and 
pheasants into Ohio and we predict the 
Parker gun and the Remington guns and 
ammunition will be used extensively in 
that State — now that a limited amount 
of sport will be provided. The prohibi- 
tion of sport in Ohio touched us keenly 
since the State used to be a good shoot- 
ing ground, one of the best in the 
world. 

More Tuna. 

The Sportsmen's Review says : 
In California the tuna industry has grown 
to such proportions that at the present time 
it is one of the largest among commercial 
fisheries. 

The tuna industry has grown until now it 
is the largest of our commercial fisheries. 
During the past season, the canners of south- 
ern California put up 3,500 cases, which were 
worth, wholesale, about $1,000,000. The weight 
of the fish required for this number of cases 
was 25,000,000 pounds, or more than double the 
total, weight of salmon taken in the state. 
Besides this, 1,000,000 pounds were salted, 
dried or fresh. The long-finned tuna, the only 
variety canned, is a fish of wide distribution, 
and spawns in the tropical waters of Mexico. 



It comes north in countless numbers, following 
the schools of sardines upon which it feeds. 
It is not believed that the present large take of 
tuna will seriously reduce the supply. At least, 
no action is contemplated to restrict fishing, 
as no young or spawning fish are taken in the 
state waters. 

Conservation in Minnesota. 

Fins, Feathers__and Fur, the official 
bulletin of the Minnesota Game and Fish 
Commission, well says that the compli- 
cated and more or less stringent laws 
have failed to save or stay to any great 
extent the sure and steady diminution of 
the game for the reason that adequate 
machinery for the carrying of the laws 
into effect has not been provided. Laws 
alone never have and never will save the 
game from extermination. A compre- 
hensive, honest and intelligent system of 
enforcement is as essential as the laws 
themselves. Minnesota, we are told, 
was one of the earliest of the States to 
set up the stringent safeguards. 

We read in a Maine report long ago 
that the entire State militia would be in- 
adequate to properly save the game. This 
is quite true everywhere. The trouble 
is, as we have often pointed out, that 
the shooting of only two or three birds 
in a season by a big army of sportsmen 
is entirely too much because it is an ex- 
traordinary destruction and tends to de- 
stroy the stock birds left by vermin. The 
game never vanishes in places where the 
shooting is heavy provided it is properly 
looked after and protected from its nat- 
ural enemies. We have seen thousands 
of birds shot on a few hundred acres 
year after year without any danger of 
extinction because vermin did not get 
much game and the sportsmen left some 
for breeding stock. It requires persistent 
daily effort, to keep the game sufficiently 
plentiful to warrant any shooting. 
Sportsmen willing to make such effort 
should be encouraged to do so. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder. 
Our slogan is "More Game and Fewer 
Game Laws." 



Advertisements in The Game Breeaer 
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THE GAME BREEDER 137 



< THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 

I Third Paper. 

By DWIGHT W. HUNTINGON. 

In my article last month I referred The ground we shot over easily should 
to the competition between the farmers yield a few hundred birds per diem 
and the town sportsmen in places where to a party as well equipped as we were, 
any prairie grouse occur. One of our but, no doubt, there are few if any 
readers has invited my attention to an- grouse on it today. Many of the fields 
other competitioir between the local gun- had been made uninhabitable for grouse 
ners and those who come from the cities by reason of the destruction of their 
to pursue these most excellent game natural foods and covers. No attempts 
birds. This reminded me of a shoot- were made to protect the game from 
ing trip which I once made to Northern its natural enemies and the competi- 
Indiana. The prairie chickens were re- tion between the gunners of course re- 
ported to be plentiful and I was invited suited in the destruction of the stock 
to join a small shooting party of four birds which were left after vermin had 
guns, one of the number having ar- freely dined. Not a bird should be shot 
ranged, with a farmer who owned a on such grounds, if we would expect to 
large farm, to entertain us. see the game perpetuated, until some 

We made our plans to arrive on the of the natural covers and foods are re- 
ground the day before the shooting sea- stored and until the game is protected 
son opened and we were met at the sta- from, its natural enemies in order to 
tion by the farmer, who expressed his make a place for the shooting. It is 
regrets that we did not come a week very fevident why the shooting of prairie 
earlier. The shooting' had been very grouse has been ended on vast areas 
lively he said and he found most of the and it is evident that the laws prohibit- 
birds had been shot. He was not a ing shooting at all times are necessary 
sportsman, but said he would go out and will remain so until the grouse are 
with us and show us the ground and properly looked after and multiplied by 
his neighbors would give us permission game breeders for sport and for profit, 
to shoot. Those who wish to restore the grouse 

The following morning we took the and to make and keep them plentiful 
field with four excellent dogs, my own should be encouraged to do so. The 
brace being the best dogs I ever owned, grounds must be made attractive and the 
On the farm owned by our host we natural foods and covers must be re- 
found one grouse which flushed wild stored. Since the valuable bulletin by 
but which I fortunately stopped by a Dr. Judd, to which I have referred, is 
snap shot, and during the day, tramping out of print I shall reprint a good part 
over many miles of excellent grouse of it in order that those who under- 
couijtry we flushed several sadly de- take grouse breeding, in the states where 
pleted covies and a few single birds, the such industry now is legal, may know 
bag for the day being seven birds. Dur- what natural foods the grouse require, 
ing the week we explored the county The papers on the food habits of the 
for miles about, having a wagon at our grouse will be followed by a paper on 
disposal to move from one likely ground grouse enemies and a paper on how an 
to another, but the birds evidently had inexpensive grouse club easily can have 
been shot out and we seldom found more splendid shooting on grounds where 
than four or five associated, and the bag few, if any, grouse occur, and where 
for four guns, if my memory serves me, there will be no shooting until prac- 
did not average a half dozen birds per tical game breeding and preserving is 
diem. undertaken. 



138 THE GAME BREEDER 



A WEST VIRGINIA GAME PRESERVE. 

IMr. J. A. Viquesney, who sent us the following account of the big game reserve for 
West Virginia, is the state forest, fish and game warden for that state. He is one of the 
most capable state game officers and is fully aware that private industry must be encouraged 
and not prevented by legislation. — Editor.] 

Wilderness embracing over 50,000 of "West Virginia was one of those who 

acres in the counties of Pocahontas and saw in the movement the carrying out of 

Randolph is to be converted into the a plan he had himself long had in mind, 

greatest game preserve in the United Pennsylvanians interested in the old 

States. club formed by Colonel Edwards in- 

A deal has been closed by which J. eluded E. J. Allen, H. J. Bailey, J. M. 

A. Viquesney, State Forest, Fish and Bell, the Mellons and other prominent 

Game Warden of Belington, and H. M. Fittsburghers ; H. S. Brunot, of Greens- 

Lockridge, of Huntersville, president burg; C. C. Chalfant, Eta; Dr. H. C. 

and vice-president, respectively, of the Daly, Gibsonton, and many others. 

Allegheny Sportsman's Association, have Among the New Yorkers interested 

purchased from Colonel William Sey- are W. Hartley, of Ilion; F. S. Caldwell, 

mour Edwards of Coalburgh and Char- George Innes, Jr., Charles M. Pratt, 

leston, a lease on this tract which will H. Phipps, Jr., of New York City, 

extend over a period of thirty years. The Ohioans included D. J. Sinclair 

Colonel Edwards was the founder of and C. H. Steele of Steubenville ; Henry 

the Cheat Mountain Club, the purpose H. and John T. Stambaugh of Youngs- 

of which was to make the wilderness a town; Rw Bentley, Lowellville; J. G. 

private preserve with its products en- Battelle, Columbus. 

joyed by the club membership. He en- The West Virginians included John 
listed a large number of persons in this T. McGraw, Grafton; Henry G. Davis, 
movement, but because of failing health Elkins; J. J. Holloway and R. C. Dal- 
was unable to continue to carry out his zell, Wheeling; W. G. Brown, King- 
original project, although he has estab- wood. 

lished a mammoth fish hatchery on the T. Wallis Blackistone, of Baltimore; 

property and made many other expen- W. R. Gorby of Detroit; Harold Pierce 

sive improvements. of Philadelphia; Alex Reynolds, San 

The property under lease is that of Diego, Cal. ; J. S. Schoonmaker, Plain- 

the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Co. field, N. J., were among the others. 

It was purchased in 1899 from the This mammoth preserve commences 

Dewings, pioneer purchasers of Kalama- at the very top of the Cheat mountain 

zoo, Mich. The price paid was $585,000. range on the; west and takes in the Val- 

The timber wanted by the company has ley of Shaver, a fork of the Cheat River, 

all been cut and no further effort will across to the summit of the back Alle- 

be made to remove timber from the tract ghenies or Shavers Mountains, as they 

until a new growth has grown sufficient- are commonly called, on the east. On 

ly. In the meantime the property will the northwest it is bounded by what is 

be the habitat of wild game, of which known as the old Fish Hawk trail, and 

bears, deer and turkeys now abound, continues up the Cheat River a distance 

This game will be given protection out of nearly fifty miles to Elk Mountain, 

of seasons and will be made to afford It has long been known as a hunting 

sport for the lessees and their friends and fishing grounds and is so marked 

in certain seasons. and denominated in Bradley's Atlas of 

When Colonel Edwards first ob- the World, 

tained the lease, he associated with him The Cheat River flows through this 

prominent men from all over the coun- preserve a distance of about fifty miles, 

try. The late Senator Steven B. Elkins while the Greenbrier River on the east 



THE GAME BREEDER 139 

side of Shaver's Mountain flows souths, friend, the late Colonel A. H. Winches- 

These rivers, with their various tribu- ter. 

taries, furnish this preserve with over The elevations of the preserve range 

200 miles of trout fishing, while the from 2,000 to 4,440 feet. That at the 

mountains abound in black bear, deer, main club house is 3,450 feet, 
turkeys, grouse and various small game. It was the hig'h elevation and the 

The Parkersburg and Staunton turn- natural adaptability of the preserve that 

pike runs from east to west through the induced Colonel Edwards to start the 

property and this is designated as the movement to make it a giant venture, 

automobile route, east and west, by the and the same inducements led Mr. Vi- 

Blue Book for this year. quesney and Mr. Lockridge to take the 

There is already a main mammoth land from his hands and agree to carry 

club house on the preserve. It is one out the plans that were originated by 

of the most picturesque buildings in him. The purchasers are not only the 

West Virginia. It is constructed of principal officers, but the most active 

cherry and pine logs. It is forty by sixty members of the Allegheny Sportsman's 

feet and two and one-half stories in Association. It is their intention to lay 

height. The house is finished inside with off 10,000 acres of the land as a game 

cherry and pine, and has several baths sanctuary or refuge to be bountifully 

of various kinds. It has a comfortable stocked with deer and other kinds of 

capacity for thirty or forty guests. Other game. An addition will be built to the 

lodges are maintained throughout the main club house and new lodges will 

preserve for the accommodation of the be built. 

hunters who get far away from the main The preserve will not only be ar- 

quarters. A huge chimney sets off this ranged for accommodation of West Vir- 

structure. It is made of cut stone and ginians who enjoy hunting and fishing, 

itself cost $2,000. but will be made sufficiently attractive 

The streams are restored with fish to enlist those of similar inclinations 
very year. Trout in this territory are from all over the country. For the next 
more numerous than any place else in thirty years or more West Virginia will 
this part of the world. Colonel Edwards have what no other State has, a well- 
tells of having caught many trout from protected game preserve, second in size 
his horse as he traveled through the to none, and equaled in but few partic- 
mountains in former years by his old ulars by any. 



PLANTING TROUT FRY. 

By D. C. Beaman. 

Lack of success sometimes attends ef- too much current and no shade. If the 

forts at trout propagation. This comes following suggestions are heeded there 

generally from improper handling and should be but little loss, 

injudicious planting. I have been for 1. In case the distance from station to 

the last 15 years engaged in the cultiva- place of planting is more than one mile, 

tion of trout in Colorado waters, and be- or there is Hkely to be delay in transit, 

lieve that trout fry can be shipped al- ice should be provided and placed in the 

most any distance under proper care, cans in small quantities from time to 

and when judiciously planted will nearly time as required to keep the temperature 

all live. The things that lessen the vital- of the water about the same as when 

ity of the trout are careless handling in received. In case the water where they 

transit, being planted in water either are to be planted is known to be warmer 

much colder or warmer than that in the than that in the cans, the latter may be 

cans, and, where there is deep water, allowed to slowly warm up while en 



140 



THE GAME BREEDER 



route from the station, but the cans 
should be protected from the sun. 
. 2. If the temperature of the water is 
kept substantially as when received, and 
the wagon kept moving, the fry will 
require nothing more while in transit, 
but if a stop exceeding ten minutes is 
made the attendant (having provided 
himself with a dipper) should every few 
minutes dip water from the cans and 
pour it back into the cans, from a height 
of one foot, to thoroughly re-aerate the 
water. This is better than to change the 
water and substitute some water pos- 
sibly unsuitable for fish life. 

3. At time of planting there should 
be not more than three degrees differ- 
ence in the temperature of the water in 
the cans and that in which the fry are 
planted. This equalization can be ac- 
complished by dipping up the water 
from the stream or lake in which it is 



proposed to plant them, and pouring it 
into the cans, until the temperature is 
about the same in both, as the water 
being poured into the cans, and permit- 
ted to run over for a few minutes, will 
practically substitute the stream or lake 
water for that in the cans, and do it so 
gradually that the trout will feel no ill 
effects. A thermometer is desirable, but 
not necessary as the equalization can be 
tested by the hand. 

4. In planting, pour out the fry and 
water from the cans gently, and not too 
near together, and if possible in small 
channels or bayous of gently running 
water, where there is grass and willows, 
as the fry will there be in less danger 
from larger fish, get feed and shade and 
stay until they have strength to tackle 
the current in the rriain stream ; otherwise 
plant in shallow places near the shore 
where there is shade. 



ance. They ripen in July and August 
and are available to ducks throughout 



ELEVEN IMPORTANT WILD DUCK FOODS. 

Third Paper. 
By W. L. McAtee. 

IThis valuable paper about the natural food of wild ducks is printed from a bulletin 
issued by the Bureau of Biological Survey, United States Department of Agriculture.] 

Thalia. 
Value as Duck Food. 

The writer's only experience with 
thalia (species divaricata) as a wild-duck 
food was on St. Vincent Island, Florida. 
Here a slough filled with a tall growth 
of these elegant plants was a favorite 
resort of ducks, especially mallards, 
which could always be flushed from this 
place. However, at the time of the 
writer's visit only one bird was obtained 
and its stomach contained a few thalia 
seeds. Another mallard collected at a 
later date in the same place, by the late 
Dr. R. V. Pierce, had fed almost exclu- 
sively on these large seeds, and its gullet 
and gizzard were well filled by 144 entire 
seeds and fragments of others. 

The evidence is sufficient to show that 
thalia has great possibilities as a wild- 
duck food. The seeds are large and 
nutritious and are borne in great abund- 




;Fig. 5— Thalia divaricata. 

the winter, if the water is not frozen 
over. 

A single plant of Thalia divaricata is 



THE GAME BREEDER 



141 



a stout, one-leaved stalk from 4 to 15 
feet in height, rising from a large tuber- 
like root, and the stems are usually clus- 
tered (Fig. 5). The leaf is much like 
that of canna, is stalked, and may meas- 
ure 5 inches wide and 15 inches long. 





Fig. 6 — Seeds of Thalia. 

The top of the stalk divides and subdi- 
vides into a large fruiting head which 
may bear from 200 to 300 seeds. The 
ultimate branches of the fruiting head 
are strongly zigzag. The flowers and 
seeds are borne, in husks, each of which 
is formed by two purplish bracts, one 
much larger than the other. The oblong 
seeds (Fig. 6) are plump and vary in 
length up to three-eighths of an inch. 




Fig. 7 — Leaves and fruit of water elm. 

They have thin, closely fitting individ- 
ual husks, are slightly curved, and bear 
numerous longitudinal rows of small ir- 
regular elevations which are lighter in 
color than the rest of the surface. 



Distribution. 

Thalia divaricata is native from Flor- 
ida to southern Arkansas and Texas and 
southward into Mexico, and doubtless 
it will thrive as far north as South Caro- 
lina and Missouri. Two other species 
(T. dealbata and T. barbata) occur in 
the region from South Carolina and Mis- 
souri south to Florida and Texas. Their 
value as duck food is unknown. 
Propagation. 

Thalia can be propagated from either 
seeds or rootstocks. The seeds have a 
thick shell and the rootstocks are mas- 




Fig. 8 — Seedlingrs of water elm. 

sive, so that neither should be injured 
if transported with ordinary precautions. 
Thalia occurs in greatest abundance in 
muddy sloughs, but it will grow in open 
water from 2 to 3 feet deep. If planted 
directly into open water, rootstocks 
should be used. Seeds should either be 
placed in shallow water or sprouted in a 
protected place and the young plants set 
out after they have attained some size. 
Water Elm. 
Value as Duck Food. 

That trees should produce food for 
wild ducks is at first thought surprising 
but many do, as oaks, thorns, hollies, 
ashes, hackberries, and others; none is 
of more value for this purpose, how- 
ever, than the water elm. 

The most common. wild duck in cen- 
tral Louisiana is the mallard ; in fact 
it outnumbers all other species combined. 



142 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Foods important to it, therefore, are the 
important duck-foods of the region. One 
hundred and seventy-one mallards col- 
lected in the vicinity of Mansura and 
Marksville, during October, November 
and December, had fed on the seeds of 
water elm to the extent of 45.5 per cent, 
of their total subsistence. The largest 
jTumber of seeds taken by a single duck 



on the margins of sluggish streams. 
Normally it grows in water which is 
permanently 2 to 3 feet deep, but it sur- 
vives prolonged inundation of much 
greater depth. The tree seldom exceeds 
40 feet in height and 20 inches in diam- 
eter, and usually is much smaller. 

The bark is much like that of the hop 
hornbeam or ironwood, and the leaves 




FJg. Q— Range 

was upward of 200. These tightly filled 
the whole gullet and gizzard. 

Other species of ducks seem to be 
fond of the seeds, judging from smaller 
numbers examined from this region. 
These include the black duck and the 
ringneck. Water-elm seeds are eaten by 
Arkansas mallards also. 

Description of Plant. 

The water elm thrives in swamps and 



of water elm. 

(Fig. 7), while obviously similar to those 
of our other elms, are smaller and have 
blunter marginal serrations. 

The water elm flowers very early, 
from February to April, and the fruit 
usually ripens and falls in a month or 
six weeks, but occasionally is found on 
the trees as late as August. The ex- 
treme length of a single specimen of the 
fruit is about a third of an inch. It con- 



I 



THE GAME BREEDER 



143 



sists of a plump seed with a shiny blue- 
black coating, inclosed in a burrlike hull 
(Fig. 7) which is ridged and provided 
with numerous fleshy projections. The 
fruits, which are very numerous, drop 
into the water immediately upon or even 
before ripening. Seedlings (Fig. 8) come 
up by the thousand in midsummer and 
young plants in all stages of growth are 
abundant, proving that, for increase, 
seed is the main dependence of the tree. 
The water elm is also known (in 
books) as planer tree, and among the 
French-speaking people of Louisiana as 
chataignier and charmille. 

Distribution. 
The range (Fig. 9) of the water elm 
(Planera aquatica) extends from the 
lower Wabash Valley in Indiana to the 
river bottoms of eastern Texas, and 
from western Tennessee and southeast- 
ern North Carolina to Florida. 

Propagation. 

Seeds of the water elm do not seem 
to be ripe at the time they usually fall ; 
the real ripening probably occurs as they 
lie in the water beneath the parent tree. 




Fig. lo — Leaves of swamp privet. 

While it is difficult, therefore, to collect 
seeds in proper condition for planting, 
young plants of water elm abound and 
if carefully lifted and packed should 
stand shipment well. Great care must 
be taken to prevent the roots from dry- 
ing. They should be embedded in balls 



of earth and sewed up in burlap. Trans- 
portation should be as rapid as possible 
and the young trees should be set out or 
heeled in immediately upon receipt. 
Transplanting should be done when the 
trees are leafless. 

Swamp Privet. 
Value as Duck Food. 
The swamp privet is included princi- 
pally on account of the testimony of 




Fi?. II — Seedlings of swamp privet. 

numerous hunters as to its usefulness. 
Wood ducks in particular are said to 
feed extensively upon its seeds. Weeks 
before other species of ducks arrive these 
birds are abundant in the country where 
swamp privot grows and are said to con- 
sume most of the crop of seeds, leaving 
little for other ducks. The seeds have 
been found in numerous mallard stom- 
achs, but in quantity in only one. 
Description of Plant. 
Swamp privet (Forestiera acuminata) 
or bois blanc, found in the same kinds 
of localities as the water elm, is a 
smooth-barked shrub (sometimes a small 
tree) usually with drooping stems, which 
frequently take root at the tip. The 
smooth, light-green leaves (Fig. 10) are 
opposite, oval, taper-pointed at both ends, 
and with rounded serrations which are 
more prominent on the apical half. The 
fruit of swamp privet is a blue watery 
berry from, one-half to three-fourths of 
an inch in length. Greatly subject to 
insect attack, it is usually distorted. The 



144 



THE GAME BREEDER 



pit is nearly as long as the berry, pointed 
at both ends, and has numerous length- 
wise, fibrous ridges. The seed within is 
white and smooth. The flowers, borne 
in clusters, bloom in March and April, 
and the fruit is ripe in May and June. 

As is the case with seeds of the water 
elm, those of the swamp privet may re- 
main under water for a long period with- 
out apparent deterioration. Probably 
most of the seeds are exposed by the 
annual lowering of the water level and 
germinate the summer they are produced 
(see Fig. 11). Whether those which 
fall in deeper water ever germinate is 
unknown, but it is certain, so far as 
utility as duck food is concerned, that 
they keep in perfect condition far into 
the succeeding spring. 



Swamp privet is native from central 
Illinois and Tennessee, near Nashville, 
south to Texas and Florida (see Fig. 
12). 

Propagation. 

Fruits of swamp privet fully ripen 
upon the tree. The seeds, being pro- 
tected by a fibrous cover and the pulp 
of the berry, undoubtedly will stand 
shipment for ordinary distances. Prompt 
handling is advisable, however, and the 
usual precautions against fermentation 
should be taken. The seeds should be 
sown in well-watered beds and the young 
plants grown to some size before setting 
out. Collected young plans and the off- 
shoots produced by the rooting of the 
tips of branches of older ones may be 
handled like those of the water elm. 



PHEASANT BREEDING. 

By C. W. Macklin. 



It is needless to say I was very much 
interested in The Game Breeder for the 
very objects of The Game Conservation 
Society are such as appeal to me, and 
they should to every other game breeder 
and sportsman in the United States and 
Canada. I wrote Mr. John Talbot, 
pointing out the need of just such an 
organization, also an official organ or 
publication such as The Game Breeder 
promises to so admirably fill before I 
knew such a paper and society were an 
accomplished fact. My thanks go to Mr. 
Talbot for bringing my name before you. 

I have been exceptionally busy of late 
attending the many pressing duties of 
this season or you would have heard 
froili me promptly. I have been work- 
ing in a quiet way with you. From this 
date I intend to give more time and 
energy to the achievement of our .com- 
mon interests. Perhaps a little of my 
experience as a pheasant, breeder would 
be of interest to you. From the first 
time I saw a pheasant I was an admirer. 
However, I was told they could not be 
raised successfully here, the young be- 
ing so delicate, or that only an expert 
could hope to raise any and he only a 



very few. Fearing I had not the quali- 
fications of an expert, and having a dis- 
like for failure I was tardy about buying. 
A few years since a breeder offered me 
a pair (cheap) ; I purchased. When the 
birds arrived here and I liberated them 
I soon concluded they were dear at any 
price. The female lived one month. The 
cock joined her in the happy hunting 
grounds two weeks later. 

The next pair I purchased from an- 
other party at regular prices. The hen 
commenced laying early in April, laying 
in all 26 eggs. One egg was dropped 
from the roost and broke, another got 
frozen, one was crushed in hatching. 
The other 23 hatched, all strong, cute 
little birds. 

The first six hatched died in less than 
two weeks. Knowing that others would 
soon be through the shell caused me to 
do some thinking along common sense 
lines. The result was I reared the en- 
tire seventeen that followed later. Find- 
ing a great pleasure in those birds, also 
a ready sale, as they were ornamental, 
I felt encouraged to try my hand with 
other varieties. I found also that 
patrons I had supplied with stock were 



THE GAME BREEDER 



145 



of the same mind. Two years ago I shooting and supplymg our tables with 

had such a demand that I was sold short the most dainty game meat That these 

of breeding stock before I was aware cannot be sold as food I find the greatest 

of it causing me to import a number of grievance. The unreasonableness of our 

birds' to replenish. present game laws are most apparent. 

Up to this time I had only attempted Naturalists agree that m their wild state 

to raise a few, neither had I read a pheasants reproduce more males than 



work on pheasants, preferring to study 
it out by close observation of their 
nature and the results of different kinds 
of food and pens, etc. 

A gentleman from Pennsylvania came 
over to see my pheasantry last June. 
As I showed him the different systems 
of management, from the first pen to 
the more elaborate and much enlarged 
system used at present, and as _ he 
watched me prepare food and noticed 
how the healthy young poults eagerly 
devoured it. "Delighted," he exclaimed, 
"this is the best trip of my life." 

What pheasant books have you read, 
he asked. I told him I had none. 

Well, he said, I have read everything 
I could get hold of ; I have visited many 



females and a number of males are never 
selected by the females. The extra cocks 
either are killed off by those selected or 
live solitary lives. 

In their somewhat demoralized con- 
dition in a state of captivity I find this 
the case. Again one cock will mate with 
from one to a dozen or more hens. 
What is to be done with the extra cocks ? 
I have yet to learn that I can legally 
kill one of those birds and reduce it 
to food. I am sure I cannot offer it to 
another. I wish to be law-abiding but I" 
am up against it right now. In trying 
to solve this proposition I liberated 
some. I find while I cannot shoot, others 
do. Neither can I afford nor have I 
the inclination to go to the great ex- 
pense- of importing birds, putting up 



of the pheasantries, but say, you have j ^ ^^^^ iJ order to turn them 

them beat. He has become a customer ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^j^ ^^ ^ ^^^^^^ ^^ 

since and a good friend. I^jjl^ 

From the stock I had last season I sir, I would suggest the laws should 

expected to rear about 200 birds but j^g gQ framed as to foster and develop 

they hatched out well and were as hardy ^j^e highest type of manhood. As it is, 

as nails and I reared over 450. This I t^g tendency is to demoralize. Laws 



did as a side line, in addition to general 

farm work on 250 acres, with only the 

assistance of one man and my son, age 

13 years, and, sir, I reasonably conclude, 

were I to give my entire attention to this 

work I could raise pheasants by the 

thousand. What can be done here can 

be done most anywhere, as I have no 

natural advantages of location. 

I have raised the young of many 
varieties. I find very little difference in 
results obtained from young hatched, 
some varieties requiring more seclusion 
or warmth or shade or more meat in 

rations. All require just a little study on acknowledge that it is against the law 
the part of the attendant. But, sir, in to offer the food the answer is, "What 
considering rearing pheasants on a large good are they," or "How do you dis- 
scale I find myself seriously handicapped pose of surplus stock?" All say the law 
in marketing. While there is a demand is wrong if it will not allow a man to 
for ornamental varieties, for various dispose of his own pheasants the same 
purposes the covert species or commoner as he can chickens or turkeys, 
varieties are used more especially for Well, I am with you for "more game 



should encourage and protect industries 
that are for the betterment of mankind 
making the way for their maintenance 
easier. We hear of the high cost of 
meats. Would not the hundreds and 
thousands of pheasants help in that di- 
rection? Were the markets open on 
this continent for the sale of such foods 
it would be a great boon to an industry 
filled with promise. 

I am frequently asked by those pro- 
posing to engage in pheasant breeding, 
what is the price of pheasant meat on 
the open market. When I have to 



14ti 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and fewer game laws" and I feel con- all concerned we shall finally accomplish 
fident that by a united, earnest effort of our desired object. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



A Deer Trouble. 

One of our Iowa readers says: 'T 
would be pleased to have you give me 
some information how to keep and feed 
deer so they will live and keep thrifty. 
I have some of the North American 
white-tailed deer. They will start to get 
thin and keep falling away and then 
finally die. If there is anything that can 
be done to avoid this I would like to 
know it." 

The trouble may be due to the lack 
of proper foods. We have written for 
full particulars about the ground, the 
food, the water, etc., and we hope then 
to make some suggestions and that many 
of our successful deer breeders will also 
give their opinions as to the cause of 

the trouble. 

» 

Blasting Doesn't Harm the Chickens. 

"During the past year I have been 
very much interested in the use of dyna- 
mite and have taken to using it for vari- 
ous purposes on our little three acre 
place in the suburbs of Belvidere. 

"I recently had an experience that I 
thought might interest you. Five feet 
from my poultry house I decided to put 
in a gate post so as usual I put in my 
bar about 18 inches loaded up with one- 
half regular sized stick, retired to a safe 
distance to see her go up, when I re- 
membered I had three hens setting inside 
the wall where I was about to shoot. 
The explosion was heavier than usual as 
it was in gravelly soil and threw dirt 
and stones in all directions. 

"The hens had set for 10 days and 
were covering 44 fertile eggs (Rhode 
Island Reds) having already been tested 
out. Contrary to the predictions of my 
neighbors, I to-day had 41 first-class 
healthy chicks hatched out which I think 
settles the theory that dynamite kills 
germs in eggs (or rather does not). The 
hens were setting on a platform 12 



inches above ground, 1-inch boards in 
back of coop on a 6-inch concrete foun- 
dation and the shot about 4^ feet from 
the wall. 

"Yours very truly, 

"Wm. E. Anderson." 

Note. In spite of Mr. Anderson's 
experience we advise against blasting 
near eggs intended for hatching or which 
have been set on for only a day or two. 
Eggs set on for 10 days contain a live 
foetus which would survive a shock that 
might kill the life-germ of an unhatched 
e^gg. — Du Pont Magazine. 



Use of "Black Oil." 

Some one asked about painting 
chicken houses with "black oil" for 
roup. We use black oil by the barrel; 
it is a very cheap oil, used among other 
things to lubricate certain parts of en- 
gines, and other machinery. It is black, 
dirty-looking and very greasy. You 
know some oils seem more greasy than 
others. It is made from petroleum, in 
fact is the residue after some of the 
lighter oils have been taken out. Prob- 
ably it is the cheapest oil on the market, 
except the "crude," wholesale worth 
probably four cents a gallon, and obtain- 
able from any mill supply house. 

What is it good for? As a poultry- 
house paint, to keep out mites and lice, 
I doubt if there is anything better, it 
being greasy and staying that way. You 
can neither paint nor whitewash over it. 
I should judge it was a good disinfect- 
ant, doubtless retaining a little phenol, 
but for use as a preventive of disease, I 
would put no faith in it, though it is 
harmless. I have cured several pet dogs 
of the mange by rubbing them with black 
oil, then shutting them up where they 
could not come in contact with civiliza- 
tion for a few days. It has a very sooth- 
ing effect. For several years ago I had 



THE GAME BREEDER 



147 



a little fox terrier who had the mange. 
He scratched and scratched one night 
until it got on my nerves, so I took the 
bottle of black oil and gave him a soak- 
ing on the mangy places. In about 15 
minutes the scratching stopped, the dog 
evidently went to sleep, and in a few 
days he was cured of scratching, and in 
a couple of weeks the mange was gone 
and new hair growing. I have tried all 
kinds of mange dope, but now use black 
oil, as it has proved a positive cure. I 
just soak it in without washing the place, 
and it seems to be absorbed by the scabs 
and held on until they drop off. I have 
never used it internally, ■ except on 
chicken houses, and it did not hurt them. 
I doubt if it is any good whatever for 
the interior decoration of animals. — 
M. A. P. — Rural New Yorker. 



Mast a Valuable Game Food. 

Acorns, beech nuts and other nuts are 
valuable foods for game, both deer and 
birds. In Germany we are ^ told that 
acorns can be purchased by the car load 
and having had a number of requests 
for acorns we endeavored to ascertain 
if they could be purchased to advantage 
in America. A large dealer in seeds 
reported that he could only procure 
acorns at a price which would make this 
food dearer than corn. 

It would seem that in places where 
oaks are abundant acorns should be 
gathered cheaply and that they should 
be marketed as a game food. It is well 
known that the flesh of all animals is 
affected by the food they eat. The mal- 
lards we used to shoot on the Kankakee 
and other western rivers were excellent 
food because the birds fed on acorns 
and wild rice. The mallards in Cali- 
fornia often are said to be compara- 
tively poor birds for the table because 
in many localities they do not get the 
best foods. Mallard reared in captivity 
and fed only on corn should be no more 
valuable as food than any barnyard 
ducks. We should aim to supply the 
natural foods on our game farms and 
preserves. 



Notes From the State Game Depart- 
ments. 

Hon. Walter B. Eraser, State Game 
and Fish Commissioner of Colorado, 
says in his last report: 

Both the bob white, and Gambel's 
partridge, the so-called crested quail, are 
protected under our laws, and I am 
pleased to state that these valuable in- 
sect-destroyers are fast multiplying and, 
in practically every locality, receive the 
protection merited. 

Leading agricultural specialists of the 
United States agree that the quail ren- 
der the farmers and fruit-growers of 
our country services which in actual 
value run into millions of dollars annu- 
ally. One authority states that each 
quail is worth five dollars per year to 
the farmer. 

Government reports are my authority 
for the statement that "the American 
sparrow family saved the sum of $89,- 
260,000 to the farmers in 1910 in con- 
suming weed seed, and that one-half of 
the daily food of the quail consists of 
undesirable weed seeds." 

I have recently issued several permits 
to responsible parties residing in locali- 
ties adapted to quail, and where there 
are but a few, authorizing them to ar- 
range for the trapping of such birds, 
in numbers of from two to five dozen, 
the trapping to be conducted in locali- 
ties where the quail are plentiful, with 
the express understanding that the birds 
are to be shipped and liberated in new 
districts. 

It is the intention of the department 
to assist our citizens, who will guaran- 
tee protection to the birds, in securing a 
proper number for liberation, where feed 
is plentiful, and where the winters are 
not too severe. 

For several years the quail have been 
increasing rapidly upon the western 
slope, especially in the fruit-growing sec- 
tions of Mesa, Delta, Montrose, and Fre- 
mont Counties, and it is reported that 
large numbers are to be found in the 
Arkansas and Platte valleys on the east- 
ern slope. 

Inasmuch as the value of these birds 



148 



THE GAME BREEDER 



is admitted, it is most assuredly the 
solemn duty of our people to resist the 
killing of quail, and, in so doing, con- 
serve this valuable asset. 

[We regard it as the "solemn duty" of the 
Colorado people to restore quail on toast. Let 
them know that quail breeding is a very profit- 
able industry and they will get busy, no 
doubt. — Editor.] 



written by Wells W. Cooke, one of the 
most capable assistant biologists of the 
Bureau of Biological Survey. It is 
printed as a Year Book separate, No. 
642, U. S. Dept. Agr. 



OUR SHORE BIRDS AND THEIR 
FUTURE. 

The United States Department of 
Agirculture has issued a pamphlet, under 
the above title, which deals with the 
habits and migration of this interesting 
class of birds. Their decrease in num- 
bers is deplored and measures are pro- 
posed to prevent a still further loss. 

It might not be a bad plan, in addi- 
tion to the restrictions proposed, to 
make every life saving station a shore 
bird refuge, setting aside a few hun- 
dred feet or a few miles of shore and 
marsh about such stations as refuges, 
where the birds would be safe from 
persecution. The rnerit in this sugges- 
tion lies in the factlhat the life saving 
stations all are inhabited by capable na- 
tional servants who could easily give the 
birds some practical protection. We 
would be in favor of giving the guards 
some extra pay for this service. 

At present members of life saving 
crews undoubtedly take a crack at the 
shore birds and wild fowl when they 
come within range, and it is greatly to 
the credit of those who like to shoot 
that they can supply desirable food for 
the table. We would not deprive them 
of shooting during a long open season 
but would suggest that they shoot a short 
distance away from any refuges that 
may be established and, as we haive 
said, that they be compensated for look- 
ing after the birds seeking a rest near 
the stations. Shore birds might also be 
sriven a rest on small reservations about 
the lighthouses. One trouble with most 
laws, national and state, is that they 
cannot be executed. The area is too 
big for the force. A life saving crew 
always on the ground might protect 
many birds on many small areas. 

The story about the shore birds was 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 

A Kentucky Circulation. 

A country editor wrote to a catalogue 
house for some advertising. They re- M 
plied that they would be glad to use his 
space but would like to know what ter- 
ritory his paper covered, whereupon he 
told them : "This paper goes from New 
York to San Francisco, from Canada to 
the Gulf, and it keeps me working until 
2 o'clock in the morning to keep it from 
going to hell." — From the Falmouth 
Outlook. 

Minister Got Even. 

The minister was delivering his fare- 
well sermon. He had been having 
tough luck in collecting his salary and 
cpncluded to quit. Here is what he 
said : 

"Now, brethren, I have been appoint- 
ed chaplain of the penitentiary of the 
State, and this will be my last Sunday 
among you. I will preach from the text, 
"I go to prepare a place for you,' after 
which the choir will sing 'Meet Me 
There.' "^Kiowa (Kan.) Review. 



Men who sit still in the street cars 
while women stand and give as their 
excuse the assertion that women do not 
thank them when they do offer their 
seats will like this story : The man arose 
and gave his seat to a girl. "Oh, thank 
you, most kindly, sir," she replied. "Don't 
mind her being polite," explained a sad- 
faced woman. "I'm taking her to a 
sanitarium." — Kansas City Star. 



They had just finished taking a new 
film in a big German moving picture 
studio near Berlin. Among the proper- 
ties was a live stork which had been 
trained to reach out one of his long legs 
and shake hands with people. Every- 
body was gathered around the bird try- 
ing out his accomplishment. A little six- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



149 



year-old girl was among them. The 
stork shook hands with her, too. Then 
she ran beaming to her mother crying, 
"Mamma! Mamma! he knew me again 
at once !" — New York Evening Post. 



It is a good plan to have two guns 
exactly alike, of course, in balance, 
weight and in every particular. Some- 
thing may happen to a gun at any time 
and the sportsman who has a second 
gun at hand which fits him will be glad 
of it. Those who can afford to do so 
should have two guns, exactly alike. 
When they come to shoot at ducks or 
pheasants in big numbers they can use 
them both by having a loader present to 
do the loading. The Parker Bros., 
Meriden. Conn., make excellent shot- 
guns. Write to them for a catalogue. 



A Good Book. 

BiW)s OF New York. By Elon Howard Eaton. 

Part 2. Land Birds. The University of the 

State of New York, Albany. 

This is the second volume of the splendid 
\vork on the birds of New York. It is pub- 
lished as memoir 12 of the New York State 
Museum. 

The book opens with a chapter on bird 
ecology or the relationship of birds to their 
environment and their ability to adapt them- 
selves to new conditions as they arise. There 
are some useful hints for game preservers in 
this chapter. We are told that private pre- 
serves have been the salvation of many birds 
and quadrupeds in various countries of Europe 
and that this method of salvation is gaining 
ground in America. 

The author takes the modern and the right 
view about the handling and control of the 
predacious species. He says, some hawks, in- 
cluding the red-tailed hawk, and some owls 
are more beneficial than harmful, but in some 
cases they are found to do much damage. "If 
a bird lover finds the red-tailed hawks are 
destroying all the grouse in the coverts which 
they frequent these particular hawks should be 
removed from the scenes of their operations, 
and the same principles should govern our at- 
titude toward all those species on the doubtful 
list. 

This is exactly what occurs on all of the 
American preserves and the results due to the 
control of the predacious birds and mammals 
are found to be as highly satisfactory in this 
country as they are abroad. The chapters on 
the birds of prey are especially interesting. As 
the author says, comparatively few persons 
can distinguish the various species of hawks 



and other predacious birds, some of which do 
more harm than others. It is wise to let the 
farmer or game keeper decide what enemies 
are destroying the game and they will deal 
with them properly. 

There are few references to the game birds, 
these having been fully described in Volume 1. 
The pheasants, we are told, have been de- 
structive in some localities, digging up the 
newly planted corn, following the rows and 
destroying each hill in succession. 

On the English preserves the sportsmen deal 
fairly with the farmers. Scare-boys are em- 
ployed to keep the pheasants out of the fields 
when they are found to be doing much harm 
and a fair sum is agreed to an'd paid willingly 
by the sportsmen when the game evidently has 
done any damage. 

The chapters on the song and insectivorous 
birds will interest sportsmen who have country 
places and who enjoy seeing the small birds 
plentiful. The book is illustrated with many 
half-tones of birds, nests, and eggs, and a 
series of large color plates made from draw- 
ings of L. A. Fuertes. This talented artist 
has added much to the value of Mr. Eaton's 

great work. 

• 

A Double Victory. 

E. A. Randall, of Portland, ran away 
from the field for the trapshooting 
honors of the Maine State Shoot. He 
not only won the State championship 
with 99 X 100, but made his victory 
more complete by winning the high gen- 
eral average of the tournament, scoring 
390 X 400. Throughout the entire meet 
Mr. Randall used Remington-UMC Ar- 
row Steel Lined Speed Shells. 

The Portland team — E. A. Randall, 
S. B. Adams, G. A. Blanchard, W. D. 
Hinds and O. P. Weymouth — all shoot- 
ing Remington-UMC Nitro Club and 
Arrow shells, carried off the honors in 
the Interstate Team Match with a score 
of 473 X 500. 

A feaure of the meet was Randall's 
fine work the second day. He broke 
199 of 200 birds and won easily from 
the rest of the field. 

[Now that the "more game" movement is 
decidedly on in New England we predict that 
the aforesaid shooters soon will let fly a big 
lot of arrows at pheasants, wild ducks, quail, 
etc., etc. We expect to attend some big shoots 
in New England next October, when there 
will be more game killed than ever was known 
in the land. — Editor.] 



Advertising rates in The Game Breeder 
made known on application. 



150 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^f Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, AUGUST, 1915 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

Entered as second-class matter, July 9, 1915. at the Post 
Office. New York City, New York, under the Aot of March 
3. 1879, 



The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Pbixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 

Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

"IN CAPTIVITY" NONSENSE. 

It is quite as absurd to insist that all 
game must be reared "in captivity" as it 
was to insist that it must be killed, 
"otherwise than by shooting." 

The "otherwise" nonsense has been 
removed from the statute books and we 
would strongly urge our readers to pre- 
vent the perpetuation of the "in captiv- 
ity" nonsense whenever this absurdity 
makes its appearance. 

Farmers and fruit-growers are not 
obliged to raise their corn, or hay, or 
apples in greenhouses. The laws per- 
mit them to do so if they wish to do so, 
and thus it should be with game; the 
breeders should be permitted to rear 
game birds in captivity or even under 
glass if they wish to do so, but they 
should not be compelled by law to rear 
"in captivity" the species which do not 
lend themselves to hand-rearing. The 
most sanitary methods; the best; the 
cheapest; the most successful methods 
of breeding quail, grouse, teal and some 
of our other splendid game birds are 
wild breeding methods far removed from 
the ideas of "in captivity" cranks. Many 
readers of The Game Breeder now rear 
and shoot thousands of quail every sea- 
son under the most natural conditions. 
Some of our readers now rear thou- 



sands of grouse wild in their woods. 
Unfortunately it is difficult to get them 
to write stories about their successful 
enterprises since they wish to escape the 
attentions of their "in captivity" friends. 
They believe, as we do, that they own 
the grouse and quail and ducks which 
they produce. They harvest them in big 
numbers and fortunately, in most cases, 
they escape the attention of "in cap- 
tivity" mischief makers. 

The laws do not provide that one must 
rear his turkeys in the way which is 
sure to produce "black-head," or his 
chickens in a way which seems certain 
to produce roup. If he prefers to rear 
them in a sanitary way least likely to 
produce diseases he is permitted to do so. 

We are by no means opposed to the 
many interesting experiments which are 
being made with hand reared quail and 
grouse. Similar experiments have been 
made with the gray partridges and red 
grouse in Europe; but the big numbers 
of these birds annually shot, marketed, 
and eaten are reared wild in protected 
fields and woods. The pheasants and 
the mallards are hand-reared abroad in 
big numbers just as they now are in 
America. 



^»» 



A BIG MISTAKE. 

It is a mistake of large proportions 
to say that game breeders can only deal 
with deer and foreign fowls and the 
more common species of wild ducks. 
This nonsense has appeared in several 
states following the compromise in New 
York, where the celebrated Bayne bill, 
intended to prohibit the sale of rabbits 
was amended so as to permit the sale 
of deer, pheasants, mallards and black 
ducks. We urged at the time that it 
was even more important to encourage 
the practical protection of quail and 
grouse and the vanishing wood-duck and 
woodcock. Mr. Roosevelt, the chairman 
of the Senate Committee, recognizing the 
fact that it was "going some" to make 
a bill intended to prohibit the sale of a 
rabbit read so as to permit the sale of 
deer and game birds, remarked to the 
writer that in the future the law un- 
doubtedly would be further amended so 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ir.i 



as to give the native quail and grouse a 
chance. In the meantime those inter- 
ested in these birds have kept Long 
Island open to shooting and the shoot- 
ing, paradoxical as it may seem, has 
tended to increase the game. 



^'» 



QUAIL AND THE AUDUBON 
SOCIETY. 

A writer for the bulletin of the Amer- 
ican Protective Association says : "The 
closed season on quail throughout the 
year, that has prevailed, was contmued 
at the last session of the Ohio legisla- 
ture, over the protests of sportsmen, but 
through their efforts the continuation 
was for two years and not for ten, as 
desired by the farmers or perpetual as 
favored by the Audubon Society." 

We presume the reference must be to 
the local Audubon Society since we are 
assured the National Association is not 
opposed to field sports or to sportsmen. 
Whatever its attitude may have been in 
the past it now has a department of 
applied ornithology intended to encour- 
age the profitable production of the wild 
food birds. 

The United States Agricultural De- 
partment has been pointing out to the 
farmers the value of quail as destroyers 
of insects and weed seeds and the farm- 
ers everywhere, having become tired of 
trespassing gunners who too often do 
not heed trespass signs (and in fact 
often shoot them up) have been quite 
willing to put an end to shooting in 
order to put an end to a nuisance. Na- 
turalists are fully aware that where 
shooting by a large army of guns is per- 
mitted the extra check to increase is too 
much for the game provided no one 
looks after it and protects it from its 
natural enemies. Since the sportsmen 
must expect the prohibition of shooting 
on the farm, if no game breeding is car- 
ried on in order to keep up the supply, 
many now are fully converted to the 
idea that it pays to deal fairly with the 
farmers and to look after the game. 

Since practical game protection costs 
something even when the game is bred 
wild in the fields, the shooting syndi- 
cates should sell some of the game pro- 



duced to help pay expenses. Game pre- 
serving heretofore has been, for the most 
part, a rich man's game. We have al- 
ways favored clubs with small dues and 
we are much interested in a number of 
these clubs which have an abundance of 
game every year at a very small cost 
per gun — in some cases only $15. 
Advantage of Game Breeders Laws. 
Sportsmen who are organized to se- 
cure more game laws should not be 
opposed to the industrious activities of 
those who deal fairly with the farmers 
and have very good shooting. Under 
game breeders' laws they are permitted 
to shoot big bags during long open sea- 
sons and no one is damaged by such ac- 
tivity because without it soon there 
would be nothing to shoot. Long Island, 
New York, has been saved, fortunately, 
as an exhibit. Thousands of quail are 
shot there every season not only on club 
grounds but outside of them. There is 
no quail shooting in the other counties 
of the state. It should be remembered 
that about one-twentieth of the entire 
population of the United States resides 
within a few miles of this good shoot- 
ing, in the great city of New York. 
It would be an easy matter to restore 
quail shooting in the great central and 
western states provided one gun club, 
or one protective association in each 
county, would provide a noisy sanctuary 
for the members and insist, as they do 
on Long Island, that the shooting pro- 
hibition be removed from all the lands 
in the county or state. The clubs look 
after this matter and in providing shoot- 
ing for their mem.bers they provide 
shooting for all others, and they keep 
the season open from year to year. Mis- 
chief-makers have looked longingly at 
Long Island. We have often caught 
them gazing, but the fact that the bag 
limit has been increased and that more 
birds are shot every season and, best of 
all, the numbers are increasing, is 
enough to make a confirmed mischief- 
maker worry. 

OUR POLICY. 

Many of the American game laws are 
wrong in theory because they create 
fanciful crimes in which the element of 



152 



THE GAME BREEDER 



wrong doing is absent. Our readers are 
interested especially in having the laws 
amended so that it will no longer be con- 
sidered a crime to produce the wild foods 
profitably on the farms and to dispose of 
such foods in the best market. 

While we would gladly see many re- 
forms in the game laws and we believe 
that many fanciful crimes could be done 
away with to advantage, we have not the 
time nor the space to do more at present 
than push the two ideas: (1) that it 
should not be criminal to produce foods, 
profitably: (2) that such foods should be 
sold in the best markets without fear of 
the police. 

The Dean of Sportsmen, Charles Hal- 
lock, announced some time ago that our 
fight for "more game and fewer game 
laws" had been won. It is true that 
many States have amended their laws so 
as to permit the profitable breeding of all 
or certain species of game; it is also true 
that the food legally produced and com- 
ing from other States can not be sold in 
New York although similar game coming 
from abroad in cold storage is sold in 
New York. 

There are some ridiculous details to 
be worked out and our policy now is to 
see that these absurdities be made to dis- 
appear in order that game breeding be 
further encouraged. 

: — ^ 

Arrows Old and New. 

We once shot over a wide stretch of 
■excellent quail ground, in Ohio, where 
many Indian arrow points were scattered 
liberally in the fields. We picked up some 
of the flints and preserved them. 

Recently we wandered with a friend 
over a vast shooting area where practical 
game preserving has resulted in many 
thousands of quail, pheasants and ducks 
being shot every season. The ground 
was literally covered with "arrows" — 
the empties of Remington U-M-C steel 
lined shells. There were a few thousand 
^'nitro club" also, and my friend, as he 
picked up one "arrow" after another, re- 
naarked: "This must be a Remington 
place." We replied: "It pays to adver- 
tise. Practically all of our readers now 
say 'Arrow' when they shop in the gun- 
stores." — The Game Breeder. 



The Parker Try Gun. 

Parker Bros'. Try Gun permits of being so 
adjusted that most accurate measurements may 
be secured for a perfectly fitting gun. In 
order to secure these measurements the makers 
have designed a Try Gun with a grip which 
moves in relation with the stock, thus giving 
a perfect fitting grip, no matter whether the 
stock may b.e made with very little drop or 
with the maximum drop. This is accomplished 
by means of a universal joint which is located 
between the tang and the trigger plate and is 
adjustable, both up and down or to right or 
left. This permits any variation of heel drop, 
from one extreme to the other, and also gives 
any desired cast off, either to right or left. 
These adjustments are secured by means of 
socket headed adjusting screws, which are lo- 
cated in the tang and trigger plate and also on 
either side of the frame and are adjusted by 
means of the small wrench shown in the illus- 
tration. Adjustments of the comb are made 
by means of knurled nuts which are let into 
the body of the stock, and are held from turn- 
ing by spring pressure. The rear end of the 
comb may be raised or lowered so that a 
Monte Carlo effect may be secured. The 
length of stock is also adjustable by means of 
similar knurled nuts, and the angle or pitch 
of butt plate may also be changed at will, so 
that any pitch desired, may be secured. A 
still further refinement may be had by swing- 
ing the toe of the butt plate either to right or 
left in relation to the stock. This latter ad- 
justment is made by means of a screw oper- 
ated by the small wrench. After proper ad- 
justments are secured, the gun may be used, as 
all parts are amply strong so to permit the use 
of the gun in demonstrating. In order to se- 
cure the dimensions after the proper adjust- 
ments have been made, a special measuring 
device has been designed. It is firmly fastened 
to the top rib of the gun by means of locating 
pins and a thumb screw, and a vertical slide, 
which may be moved from one end of the 
horizontal bar to the other, gives the correct 
drop measurements at any point of the stock. 
The pitch is also read by sliding the vertical 
slide to the end of the stock, and pushing It 
down across the butt plate, swinging it in its 
bearing so that the slide touches the butt at 
heel and toe. The graduations on the vertical 
slide holder are in inches and will show the 
desired pitch of the gun. The cast off may 
be also read by measuring the distance of 
center lines, which are on the heel and toe of 
the butt plate, from the end of the vertical 
slide, which is exactly central with the barrels. 
For determining the length of stock, the 
measuring device is removed from the barrels 
and is used as a pair of beam calipers, a small 
finger attached to the bar being held against 
the trigger and the vertical slide held against 
the center of the butt plate. The horizontal 
bar is graduated, and the length easily and 
quickly read. 

More game and fewer game laws. 



THE GAME BREEDER 153 



Subscribe to the 
Game Breeder 
$tMO Per Year 



Now Is The Time 

It is a mistake to delay ordering stock birds - 
prices will go up later and the birds will not lay well 
unless ordered early. We had a request for several 
thousand pheasants a few days ago and the demand 
for ducks is also good. 

Write to our advertisers INOW. 



154 



THE GAME BREEDER 



IS YOUR 
BROTHER 

A SHOOTER? 




A WAVE of enthusiasm in restoring 
American prestige with the gun is 
sweeping the country. 
Shooting is viril^ sport with a strong 
appeal to that inherited protective instinct 
that made our forefathers the greatest marks- 
men in the world. 

The best place to learn to shoot is at a trap- 
shooting club, but novices shy at the idea of 
making a start in the company of a bunch of 
experienced shots. To satisfy the demand 
for an organized arrangement for beginners, 
we planned a 



National Beginners' Day Shoot 

at which your inexperienced brother, son, wife, daughter, or 
friend may learn in company with various other beginners. 

Briefly, the plan provides two trophies, 



A FOB FOR MEN, A SPOON FOR WOMEN 

The bronze fob illustrated at the left is for the best score made 
by a beginner, man or woman, at each of these beginners' 
shoots. The sterling silver Nemours teaspoon is for each 
woman, beginner or experienced, who makes the best score 
at each of these shoots. 

Best Hundred Clubs Get Cups 

The handsome bronze cup trophy illustrated will be 
given to each of the hundred clubs having the great- 
est number of beginners contesting in these shoots. 

Any club may hold a shoot any day or days in 

August. 

Write at once for full details and conditions. 



Hundred Club Cup 
8 inches high 




LET EVERY MEMBER 
GET A MEMBER 



Get every member of 
your club to pledge 
himself to bring at least 
one beginner. Here is 
your chance to double 
the membership of 
your club and do a 
real service for your 
brother, son, wife, 
daughter, or friend. 



Get the details quickly from 
Trapshooting Department 

Du Pont Powder Co. 

Wilmington, Delaware 

P. S. If you are a beginner 
write us for letter of intro- 
duction to the Secretary of 
the nearest club holding a 
Beginners' Day Shoot. 




THE GAME BREEDER 



155 




Scene at 1914 Grand American, Dayton, Ohio 

GO TO THE 

Grand American Handicap 

Grant Park, Chicago, August 16-20, 1915 

NO previous event in trapshooting will compare with the Sixteenth Grand 
American Handicap in number of entries, shooting environment, beauty 
and value of trophies and assemblage of trapshooting stars. This is 

The Premier Event of the Year 

and a ten-trap equipment, — the largest ever installed — insures to every shooter 
ideal conditions "on the firing line" of Grant Park, — Chicago's most popular 
shore resort. 

Get into this " round up" of the world's crack shots. Plan your vacation 
to include the Grand American Handicap, — the "world series" event 
of the trapshooting game. 

For program and special information write to E. Reed 
Shaner, Secretary Interstate Association, 219 Coltart 
Avenue, Pittsburgh, or to Sporting Powder Division, 

DU PONT POWDER COMPANY 



WILMINGTON 



592 Du Pont Building 



DELAWARE 



State Champions who Competed at Dayton for the National Amateur Championship 




156 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



DOGS 



BEARHOUNDb, JRISH WOLFHOUNDS, BLOOD- 
HOUNDS. Fox. deer cat and lion hounds. Trained 
and young stock. 50-page illustrated catalogue 5-cent 
stamp. ROOKWO(^D KENNELS. Lexington. Ky 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds. American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varm'.nt dogs. All 
trained. Shioped on trial. Satisfacfion guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaner to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
ofter for sale setters and pointers. lox and cat hotinds, 
wolf and deer nounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, beat and lion hounds, also Aire 
dale terntr'. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
iurige ihc quality, satisfaction guaran'ecd or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, hiehly Illustrated, instructive and 
interesting cataloaue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALE.s_THE GREAT ALL 'ROUND DOG. 

Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent ; 
have ouppies, groun dogs and brood matrons Send for 
large list. W. R. WATSON, Box 711, Oakland, Iowa. 

DOGS TRAINED AND BOARDED. BEST AR- 
ranged kennels in the South, located on 10,000 acres 
leased hunting grounds ; forced retrieving taught dogs of 
any age ; my methods never fail ; thirty years experience 
JESS M. WHAITE, Cyrene, Decatur Co., Ga. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS— tHOR- 
oughbred Stock — Bred and raised on the James River 
and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost every day of the 
Duck Shooting Season. Dogs and puppies for sale. Just 
right to break this Fall. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS. 
Thoroughbrci stock. Bred and raised on the James 
River and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost every day 
of the duck shooting season. Dogs and pups for sale. 
■i fine female puppies 6 months old. at $ .^.00 each. Just 
right to break this season. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia. 

MISCKLLANEOtJS 

RUFFED GROUSE WANTED, STATe PRICE. 
A. I. W.. care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WANTED-ACORNS. STATE PRICE PER BUSHEL. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS-RAISED AND REGIS' 
tered in old Wisconsin Eggs f 1.25 per 12 ; birds $1.50 
each. Excellent decoys. Order now. E. G. SHOWERS, 
Onalaska, Wis consin. 

WANTED— COPIES OF THE GAME BREEDER FOR 
June, 1913 ; September, igi3 ; April, 1914 ; June, 1914 ; 
December, 1914 We will pay 20 cents per copy for a 
few copies of the issues named in good condition. THE 
GAME BREEDER. 150 Nassau Street. N. Y. 

WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 



BREEDER 

New ^ork City 



WANTED— ACORNS. State price per bushel M. TAN 
ENBAUM. idQ Broadway, New York City. 



SPECKLED TROUT OIL PAINTINGS, 
"ARTIST MARTIN," Girard, Pa 



3.00 EACH. 



GUARANTEED GERMINABLE WILD RICE SEED. 
Shipment in September for fall sowing Shipped wet as 
recommended by the Department of Agriculture Supply 
limited. Order at once. ROBERT CAMPBELL, Keene, 
Ontario. 



UIVJE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOKSTX FoWL 
Eggs lor sale; several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave.. Haddonficld. N. J. 



GET WISE-RAISE PHEASANTS FOR PASTIME. 
Profitable and fascinating Send for prices. CON- 
NECTICUT FARMS PHEASANTRY, Union, Union 
County, N. J. ^ 

QUAIL. PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 

WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 

antry and Game Park. , 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now— the surest way to start 
breedint; this species We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans. Wild Duoks, etc. for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family Pamphlet witn order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES.Dunfield. Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (^°t) 

CASH PAID FOR PEA FOWLS. State age and sex. 
Will buy soo Ring Necks, 100 Amherst. 100 Goldens, loo 
Reeves. State your best price. HELEN BARTLETT, 
Cassopolis, Michigan. 

PEACOCKS. ALL KINDS OF PHEASANTS, WHITE 
African Guineas, for sale, pure blooded, non-related. I 
will buy Amherst, Reeves and Pea fowls. JOHN TAL- 
BOT, South Bend. Indiana. 9-i4-6m. 

FOR SALE — PEACOCK, each $6.00; MAMMOTH 
Flemish Rabbit $4.0o a pair at six months. Angora 
rabbit *.'i.00 a pair. Pigeons: silvered pouters $6.00 a 
pair, white fantails $2 00, white dragon $2 00, red homer 
$1 00. J. J. GAREaU, St. Roch I'Achigan. Quebec, Can. 

PHEASANTS OF NINE VARIETIES; STOCK AND 
eggs. Ringneckscontractableby the thousand. DAISY 
FARM, San Lorenzo, California. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, .Manchurian. Firebacks. Impeyans, 
etc. Kindly quote I rice A J MERLE, Alameda. Calif. 

PHEASANTS WANTED 
Two thousand English Ring Necked Pheasants. Kindly 
quote price and particulars. A, Roslyn, Long Island, 
New York 

FOR SALE-ONE PET DEER, ONE YEAR OLD. 
Address ROY CLEWITT. Kerrick, Minnesota. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breader or sign your letters: "'Yours for Mote Ganse." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



157 



WE HAVE A FINE LOT OF PINIONED PHEAS- 
ants for sale. Prices on application. THURSTON 
COUNTY GAME FARM, Olympia, Wash. H. W. 
Myers, Supt., R. F. D. No. i. 

PHEASANTS— Having plenty of breeding stock, Golden, 
Silver and Ringneck Pheasants, I would take a position 
on a Private Estate or Club to raise game, commercial or 
otherwise. W. M., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR SUPERINTENDENT- 
wanted by e.tpericnctd man as above. 20 years' first-class 
character in England and America. Understand raising 
of all kinds of Game and Ducks, training and management 
of Dogs, trapping of all kinds of Vermin. B, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

SUPERINTENDENT.— Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 years, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3,000 pheasants have been penned and 
20,000 raised yearly. Understand the raising of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management o£ incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit warrens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs. Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER— LIFE EXPERIENCED REARING 
land and water fowl, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs, conditioning for shows. A-1 rearing pup- 
pies, well up in veterinary, competent manager of club or 
private estate. Distance immaterial. J. H. W., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

GAMEKEEPER—WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January ist. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH. WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly experienced in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; 26 years' experience. 
Can be highly recommended. R. J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder. 150 Nassau Street, New York 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F., care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street. New York. 

EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 

Private Es'ate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to 

T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 

York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly understands Pheasant and Wild Duck 
raising, (will rear Pheasants by contract). Incubators, 
management of deer, rearing and training of dogs, vermin 
trapping. Well recommended. Address W. S , care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

THREE GAMEKEEPERS WANTED 
At once. Head Gamekeeper, married, without family, 
thoroughly efficient in rearing game and wild fowl, and 
their management, to show sport Good vermin trapper, 
dog breaker, and all the other various duties of a practical 
keeper. Also want two experienced Underkeepers. single. 
Send copy of references, present and last employer. Apply 
stating age, etc.. A, Roslyn. Long Island, N. Y. 

GAME £GG£ 

BOOK YOUR ORDER NOW FOR CHINESE RING- 
neck pheasant eggs. Oregon's famous game bird. $3 00 
per dozen, 820.00 per hundred. OREGON BIRD & 
PHEASANT FARM, Beaverton, Oregon. 



FINEST STRAIN OF ENGLISH RING-NECKED 
PHEASANT EGGS for sale during June; $15.00 per 
hundred, in lots of not less than 100 eggs Apply to 
DUNCAN DUNN, Superintendent, State Game Farm, 
Forked River, N. J. 

MALLARD DRAKES AND EGGS FOR SALE. Eggs 
at the rate of $2.00 a setting. REDDEiN QUAIL CLUB, 
J'aoli, Pennsylvania. 

GOLDEN AND R(NG-NECK PHEASANT EGGS 
for sale, cheap. CONNECTICUT FARMS PHEAS- 
ANTRY, Union Union County, N. J. 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early delivery. $2.50 per setting 

of 15 eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthlngton, Minn. 

FOR SALE-PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
Golden and pure Lady Amherst. One pair year old 
hybrid birds for sale. E. R. ANDERSON, So. Hamilton,' 
P. O., Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS IN JUNE, $4.80 PER HUNDRED. 
THOS. COWLEY GAME FARM, Mawdesley, Orms- 
kirk, England. 

ENGLISH RING-NECK PHEASANTS' EGGS FOR 
HATCHING, from strong healthy stock. $3 a setting. 
$23 a hundred. Miss HOPE PICKERING, Hope Poultry 
Farm. Rumford, R.I. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR DELIVERY IN MAY AND 
JUNE. $15 per 110; |125 per UOO. Guaranteed H0% fer- 
tile. Packed in dry wood will keep good for a month. 
ARTHUR DAVIS. The Pheasantries. Denner Hill, Great 
Wissenden, Buck, England (Associate Game Guild) 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
$3.00 per setting. ERNEST WOODER, Oxford Jet., 
Iowa 



PIGEONS 



BEST HOMERS AND CARNEAUX PIGEONS TIME 
and money can produce. Pictures and description free. 
Write NATIONAL SQUAB FARM, Itasca, Texas. 



I AM IN THE MARKET FOR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. K. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

Practical Book on Duck Breeciing 
for Sport and Profit 

$1.50 

The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. 



M. G. and F. G. L. 

Can you guess it? 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



158 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Game Birds 

I am now offering for immediate 
delivery my own hand-reared birds 

RING-NECK Pheasants. . . .$ 5.50 per pair 

Golden Pheasants 15.00 " " 

Canadian Grouse 10.00 " 

I also offer Pintails, Black Ducks, Teal, 
etc., and several varieties of Wild Geese. 

Safe Delivery Guaranteed. 
John Heywood, Box b, Gardner, Mass. 



THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands nnequaled. 

Nem) Edition Just Out. Illustrated. 
A olain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird 6oa subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paper cover, f 1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, 11.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Eg^ Advertising 

to produce the best results, should 
begin in the Fall. 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties.'' 

Wood Ducks, Mandarins, Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Egts, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. Eor prices of other -wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 



SOME SHOOTING WITH THE 

Double Barrel Parker Gun 

At the Indian Tournainent, Sandusky, O. , June 29-July 2, S. A. Huntley 
won high general average and amateur average, 491 x 500. Woolfolk Henderson 
second, 488 x 500. 

Fred Gilbert won second professional average, 481 x 500. Arthur Killam 
third professional average, 475 x 500. 

All of these gentlemen were shooting DOUBLE barrel Parker guns. 

WONDERFUL SHOOTING. 
Send for catalogue and 20 bore booklet, free. 

PARKER BROTHERS - - MERIDEN, CONN. 

New York Salesrooms, 32 Warren Street 



THE GAME BREEDER 



159 





of practically all 
makes you can get 
Infallible. Ask for it 
the next time vou bu^ 
shells.B 

If you are interested 
in trapshooting, write 
for our booklet called 
"Trapshooting." it 
is worth re ad in g. 
Address : 

Hercules Powder Co. 

Wilmington, Del. 




HEUPULES yqPOWDEIlCO. 



The Propagation 
of Wild Birds 

By HERBERT K. JOB 



PRICE $2.00 



Wc pay dcMvcry charges 



THE GAME BREEDER 

1 50 NASSAU STREET NEW YORK 







THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring Ducks hundreds o£ miles— my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year — also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh from their native haunts — 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I have the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. Mallards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write for My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 



Eggs and Pheasants 
For Sale 

We offer for immediate delivery. 
Silver, Golden, Lady Amhurst, Reeves, 
Elliott, Ringnecks, Mongolian, Swinhoe 
Versicolor, Impeyan Pheasants. White 
and Blue Peafowls Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails. S. C. Buff and Blue Orping- 
tons, R. I. Reds. 

WANTED 

Peafowl, Pheasants and Ducks 

White Peafowls, Black-shouldered or 
Java. In Pheasants any of Tragopans, 
Firebacks. Cheer, Soemmering. Elliott, 
Kalij White-crested Linneatus. Also 
Canvasback ducks. In writing, quote 
number, sex, lowest cash price. 

We will on receipt of 20 cents in stamps 
send colortype catalogue of pheasants. 

CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



lel^ THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop — a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated dttcks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER; 

"'Our Wild FoA^l and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but httle attention from 
writers, especially m America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUNJ 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both. handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

" The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly — and live thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finis, 
and I waa;er anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume." 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the cc^nservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE" DEALER AND REPAIRER 

''^" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntmgton, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders* is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 





Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other w^ater fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of Sngrland. I iiave fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have flO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do bo. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 80 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA, 



REAL ESTATE 

FOR S ALE^ a Tract of land suitable 
for a game park or preserve* 
Contains 2500 acres^ two lakes^ trout 
streams^ part cleared, balance wood- 
land* Timber alone is worth the 
price asked for the land* 

This tract is well suited for a 
Game Breeding Association or Shoot- 
ing Club* It is located on the Dela- 
ware River, not far from Port Jervis* 

There are a number of buildings 
. suitable for Club purposes. 

We have other properties adapted 
for Game Breeding Associations and 
Shooting and Fishing Preserves* 

For Particulars address 

W* G* LYNCH 

The W* G* Lynch Realty Co* 

Long Acre Building - - New York 



mArt I^ 1921 





f>loo perYear 

i ii i i iii i iiiiii ii iii iii iiiiiii iii ii i i i i n in niTT 




Single Copies 10 'P 




THE- 



Q AN E Dfi 





II K--'Vj,!l 



VOL. VII. 



SEPTEMBER, 1915 





*>^ 



THE" OBJECT OP THIS IlACiAZlNE- IS 

TO Make- Noeth Ameeicathe 5iggdst 
Gahe producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — Good Appoinments — More Game in Minne- 
sota — A Low Estimate — Stock Birds and Eggs — Aviary Species 
— An Insular Preserve — The Maine Meeting — Legislative Gains 
and a Laughing Stock— The Convention Habit — A Game Breeders 
Law Needed — Proposed New Conservation Commission for New 
York — A Grand Prix — An Absent Minded Bostonian — Crows 
and Corn. 

The Prairie Grouse - - - - - D. W. Huntington 

The Grayling Hon. M. D. Baldwin 

The Mountain Quail . . . . Harold C. Bryant 

Eel Grass - - - - - - - W. L. McAtee 

Chinese Pheasants . - - . Professor W. H. Olin 

Fur Farming J. E. Briggs 

California Valley Quail ----- Geo. Neale 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves. 

Editorials — Correspondence. 

Outings and Innings — Trade Notes, Etc. 





No. 5 







PUBLISMED BY 



":'vik8< 



THe GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A rjl^jiv/j -/s 



iiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiHiiiiii(riiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiHHiiHiiiiiiiiiiiniitinniiiiiiiiiiiHiHiMiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiii(iiiiiiiiiiinnnnHniHHi 






% 



cy, 



SPRATT'S PRAIRIE MEAT 




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is rich in Protein and Carbohydrates, both of which are 



work in the field than those fed on any other foods. 
Send 10c. for "Poultry Culture" and 25c. for "Pheasant Culture." 



I SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

I Newark, N. J. San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal Boston 

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THE GAME BREEDER 161 



The Time To Advertise Game Birds Is NOW 

There will be a big demand for stock 
birds and those who send in their adver- 
tisements early will get the most business. 



Egg advertising should begin not later 
than October to get the best results 
next spring. 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, >i'ew York. 

Please send me THE GAME BREEDER, for one year. 

$1.00 enolosed. 

Name 

Street 

City. ; 

State ■ 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



162 THE GAME BREEDER 




WIRE - COOPS - TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all ApplianceSsfor Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. CAKES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or eggs 

In writinf to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



163 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 

Heating and Cooking Stpves for 
Clubs and Cottages 

The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 

Campg; will work just as well in 
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Construction Companies working 
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IRON.SIDE« 



A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



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Index Heating Stoves 
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Prompt Ranges 
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Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

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Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 

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No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves Victor Hotel Ranges 

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Laundry Stoves Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 

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Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
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In writing to advertisers plaase mantion The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



164 



THE GAME BREEDER 



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MEN took to Revolver and Pistol Shooting as a sport. Got to 
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Remington-UMC business in Revolver and Pistol Cartridges grew 
by leaps and bounds. 

It is growing faster than ever to-day. More men judging ammunition 
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in the estimation of Revolver and Pistol users all over the world, both the 
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Remington-UMC Cartridges are made for every standard make of 
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— the dealers who display the Red Ball Mark of Remington-UMC 

REMINGTON ARMS-UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 
WOOLWORTH BLDG. {233 Broadway) NEW YORK CITY 



T¥. Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July q, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, iSjg. 



VOLUME VII 



SEPTEMBER, I9J5 



NUMBER 6 



SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



Good Appointments. 

One of our Ohio readers writes that 
Dr. W. J. Kirgan, of Cincinnati, and 
Mr. I. S. Myers, of Akron, have been 
appointed by Governor Willis as mem- 
bers of the Agricultural Board to repre- 
sent the fish and game interests of Ohio. 
Our correspondent says : "I believe 
these men are both of progressive ideas 
and that the matter of game breeding in 
Ohio will receive much attention on their 
part." 

Ohio progressed slowly last winter. 
The laws were amended so as to permit 
the profitable breeding of pheasants only. 
The absurdity of permitting the profit- 
able breeding of foreign fowls, and at 
the same time preventing the profitable 
breeding of our native game will per- 
meate in Ohio, no doubt, before long, as 
it has in many other States which now 
have thousands of wild ducks, grouse, 
deer and other game to illustrate the 
rapid increase due to the work of indus- 
trious game breeders. 

We recommend to the Ohio officers 
that they memorize the good old law 
Latin maxim, which translated reads : 
"The laws should aid the vigilant and 
not the sleeping." 

More Game in Minnesota. 

A correspondent of the New York 
World says : 

More than 100 residents on the 65,000 acres 
of land within the Minnetonka game refuge 
will raise mallard ducks, pheasants and quail 
next season and if their ejiperiments prove as 
successful as those of people in other States, 
these three varieties of game birds may soon 
be as readily obtainable in the markets as 
chickens, turkeys and geese now are. From 
5,000 to 10,000 eggs are to be distributed 
among those who will encourage the propaga- 
tion of wild life and if the ratio of young 



birds to eggs holds true, the refuge will be 
heavily stocked, while outside of it by 1917 
there should be more birds as fair marks for 
sportsmen than are now under protection. 

We learned with regret sometime ago 
that the large area referred to would be 
added to the big lot of posted farms in 
Minnesota and closed to shooting. A 
large part of the shooting area is now 
posted and, since some sportsmen do not 
heed the warning signs and persist in 
shooting until driven off, it is no won- 
der that the farmers have been in favor 
of putting the quail and the grouse on 
the song bird list, and in favor of laws 
protecting them from the guns at all sea- 
sons. A license to shoot is not worth 
much in many States. 

A Low Estimate. 

The estimate of Mr. Frank B. Blair 
as to what will happen on the Minne- 
tonka reservation is very low, absurdly 
so, if any considerable number of the 
people go in for "more game" for profit. 
The increase would be still larger if the 
game could be produced for sport, also, 
because the sportsmen could furnish a 
good part of the money needed to pur- 
chase stock birds and eggs and to pay 
for gamekeepers. The combined area of 
a few places near New York very much 
smaller than the area of the Minnesota 
reservation will produce next season far 
more game than the amount named by 
Mr. Blair. 

We would be pleased to have Mr. 
Blair inspect some of these places and 
we can see that he does so if he ever 
comes to New York and would like to 
see the results of the "more game" move- 
ment in this vicinity. 

Mr. Blair's opinion is given in full but 



166 



THE GAME BREEDER 



we would like to know if the Minnesota 
laws permit the marketing of all species 
of game. 

It is estimated by Frank D. Blair, 
Field Superintendent of the Minnesota 
Game and Fish Protective League, that 
within the proscribed territory about 
1,000 mallards, from 5,000 to 10,000 
quail and no more than a dozen pheas- 
ants have been taking shelter. 

At the end of tv/o seasons he believes 
that there will be 30,000 or 40,000 birds, 
the most marked increase being among 
the pheasants — now very rare which 
should be 5,000 strong. 

"The rate of increase of these wild 
birds in captivity is remarkable," said 
Mr. Blair recently. "Mallards will lay 
an average of forty eggs a season, quail 
from thirty to fifty, and pheasants 
from thirty to forty. When they are 
living in a wild state, they usually "lay 
several batches of eggs and then hatch 
out only one batch, while in captivity all 
the eggs are saved. Birds hatched will 
average roughly about sixty per cent, of 
the eggs. 

"The most serious difiBculty confront- 
ing those who experiment in the propa- 
gation of wild birds is in keeping them 
separated from poultry. They are espe- 
cially susceptible to diseases that are 
communicated\ from coops and land 
where chickens have been. A bantam 
hen is most generally used to set on the 
eggs and frequently breeders make the 
mistake of turning the young birds loose 
in the chicken yards along with the hen. 
"The Minnetonka residents who ex- 
pect to raise mallards, pheasants and 
quail are actuated by a desire to increase 
the number of birds within the refuge. 
Though they will be put to some trouble, 
the returns eventually, they believe, will 
more than ofifset the tribulations." 

Stock Birds and Eggs. 

We are glad to know that a big lot of 
stock birds and eggs will be needed for 
the Minnetonka reservation. Our adver- 
tisers furnish the best. We shall spread 
The Game Breeder abundantly in the 
neighborhood so that all intending pur- 
chasers may know just where to get the 



best and the cheapest (for the best are 
the cheapest) stock birds and eggs. 

Aviary Species. 

Reports coming to our game census 
indicates that the number of pheasants 
which are bred for ornaments in the 
aviary is increasing rapidly. Some of 
these species are bred on foreign pre- 
serves for sport but they are nowhere 
as common as the ringnecked and dark- 
necked pheasants and the various hy- 
brids produced by these birds and by 
crosses with the Mongolian and Prince 
of Wales pheasants and some other spe- 
cies. One of our Kentucky breeders re- 
ports that he has 6 of the rare Impeyan 
pheasants ; 4 Manchurian eared pheas- 
ants; 2 Elliotts; 6 Swinhoe; 3 Mongol- 
ian; 8 Prince of Wales; 10 Versicolor; 
12 Amhersts ; 2 White Crested Calij ; 12 
Reeves; 9 Silvers and 7 Golden pheas- 
ants. 

An Insular Preserve. 

President Wilson has just issued an 
order authorizing the use of a small isl- 
and lying about three miles south of 
Lake Mille Lacs, Minn., as a federal 
game preserve and a breeding ground for 
native birds. The island is locally 
known as Spirit Island, and hereafter 
will be called Mille Lacs reservation. 

The Presidential order also provides 
that the Klamath Lake reservation in 
California and Oregon, which is used 
for the protection of native birds, be re- 
duced in area, by eliminating consider- 
able land on the east and west bound- 
aries. — The Globe, N. Y. 

The Maine Meeting. 

The 20th annual outing of the Maine 
Sportsman's Fish and Game Association 
was held at Kineo. President Robert 
J. Hodgson said, "The important mis- 
sion of this association is the preserva- 
tion of game and wild life and to aid in 
the enactment of such laws as will best 
protect all wild life and at the same time 
give the sportsmen from within and 
without our State the best fishing, the 
best hunting possible." He added that 
the members of the Legislature have 
given a great deal of honest thought upon 



THE GAME BREEDER 167 

this subject. -"They may not and did the other States." He referred to the 

not agree with this association when it 700 special laws which were wiped out 

came to passing all the laws that we two years ago and deplored the fact that 

asked for, but they did listen to us and many of them had found their way back 

passed some very helpful laws." into the statute books. 

After reading the long list of new Maine is not much, if any, ahead of a 
laws, printed in Maine Woods, the most number of other States which delight in 
ardent game law enthusiast should say the game law industry but we believe it 
the Legislature did very well indeed. We will not be long before the sportsmen 
doubt if there is a lawyer in Maine who become aware of the fact that it does 
could name one-half of the laws enacted, not pay to produce hundreds of game 
It would seem that after conferring for laws every year, and year after year to 
twenty years the sportsmen of Maine shorten the season, limit the bag and, 
should be able to formulate a simple law finally to prohibit field sports. Ohio ac- 
which might have some permanency. quired a resident license and laws pro- 
Mr. Hodgson well said that laws are hibiting quail shooting, dove shooting and 
not sufficient to stay to any great extent since there are no deer, wild turkeys, 
the sure diminution of game. He pointed prairie grouse, and only a very few 
out the importance of seeing the laws ruffed grouse and wild ducks' in the 
executed. The two things needed in the State it became evident that it was hardly 
opinion of the orator are "more money; worth while to acquire a license to shoot 
more service." and the practical prohibition of shooting 
We read in a Maine State report long at the same time. It is now legal to have 
ago that the entire State militia would pheasants in Ohio, 
be inadequate to properly protect the = 
game, and this is undoubtedly true and xhe Convention Habit 
will remain so as long as all of the peo- The Maine sportsmen seem to have 
pie, resident and non-resident, destroy acquired the convention habit. They 
game, and no one is permitted to prop- nieet and have a good time ; a little trap 
erly look after it and produce it. A few shooting, dancing, dining and card play- 
noisy sanctuaries in Maine where thou- ing. They meet the politicians, candi- 
sands of game birds could be produced dates for governor and other offices; 
and shot annually would help matters j-^ey resolve opt tinkering the game laws ; 
much in that State just as they have in creating more officers, but it never seems 
other States which now have game breed- to occur to them that they should have 
ers' laws encouraging game production, "more game and fewer game laws." 
Game easily could be made abundant and ^Tq_ would suggest that they study the 
cheap in the Maine markets for six game breeders' enactments now on the 
months every year and all of the people, books in many States and that it would 
including the sportsmen, would be bene- ]-,£ -^jge for some of the Maine sports- 
fitted, men to investigate the shooting in places 

= where game always is abundant. 

Legislative Gains and A Laughing = 

Stock. A Game Breeders Lav*^ Needed. 
Hon. H. B. Austin, chairman of the The Lamar Democrat, under the head- 
Maine Inland Fish and Game Commis- ing, "Missouri Sportsmen's Extremity," 
sion, spoke of the large gains that had says : 
been made in fish and game legislation. About two more years will finish up the 

The closed season for moose and the squirrels. The quail 'lJ^\^l^f.^^^Zw 

1 • r 4.U -J <- r Ducks are getting scarce. About tne oniy 

lowermg of the non-resident license ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^e^l sportsman to do is to spit 

were referred to. A resident hunter's on his hands and get him a fly swatter. 

license was advocated. Mr. Austin well Missouri should at once enact a law 

said: "The mass of special and private encouraging the profitable breeding of 

laws is making us the laughing stock of game. The Oklahoma law would be a 



168 



THE GAME BREEDER 



good one to copy. Breeders' laws have 
resulted in a big lot of game being 
produced annually in many of the States. 
New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts 
rapidly are becoming game producing 
States. Much of the game is sold in the 
markets. 

Proposed New Conservation Commis- 
sion for New York, 

The committee on conservation of the 
Constitutional Convention has reported, 
or soon will report, to the convention a 
proposition for a commission to consist 
of nine unpaid members, each to serve a 
term of nine years, one to be appointed 
by the Governor from each of the judi- 
cial districts of the State. The nine 
members are to appoint a superintendent 
who will be the executive head. 

The idea of having a game commission 
to serve for a long term of years is good. 
Our State game officers, appointed for 
one or two years, never have been able 
to accomplish much. Some of them 
have found it necessary to devote much 
of their time to politics. The game com- 
mission in Massachusetts has done good 
work because various governors (elected 
for very short terms) have decided to 
let the commission carry on its good 
work. 

A Grand Prix "For Modern Arms and 
Ammunition." 

There is much interest among sports- 
men in the announcement, that the Su- 
perior Jury of the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition, have awarded the 
Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cart- 
ridge Company the Grand Prix^ — highest 
of honors — "for modern firearms and 
ammunition." This distinction is all the 
more creditable when it is considered 
that the exposition is international in 
character — exhibits being entered not 
only from the United States, but from 
many foreign countries. 

An Absent Minded Bostonian. 

We received in the mail the money for 
a subscription to The Game Breeder with 
nothing to indicate from whom it came 
excepting the postmark on the envelope 
— "Boston." Since we had sent a large 
mail to Boston it was impossible to de- 



termine who sent the money. It was 
wrapped up in our circular letter which 
simply was addressed "Dear Sir," being 
sent broadcast as such letters are, the 
writer evidently thought the return of the 
circular letter would indicate the sender 
of the money, but the best we can do is 
to enter "Dear Sir" on our subscription 
list and hold the magazine for a better 
address. 

Game Abundant in Massachusetts. 

We often wonder if the Massachu- 
setts game .commissioners realize the im- 
portance of the work they have accom- 
plished and if the people of the State 
realize how much excellent food has 
been produced. Where game is made so 
abundant that sentimentalists are horri- 
fied at the amount of food birds de- 
stroyed and eaten, when they complain 
in the newspapers, as they did last fall 
about the shooting, . the people should 
take notice that most capable officers 
have made it possible for those who wish 
to do so to have an abundance of a 
highly desirable food. We suggested at 
the time that the "mollycoddles" get 
after those who produced poultry and 
other foods and that they give the game 
breeders a rest. 

Oklahoma a Good Place. 

A clipping sent to The Game Breeder 
says that Hon. James W. Gerard, U. S. 
Ambassador to Germany, has written to 
a real estate dealer in Oklahoma that he 
wishes to purchase a large place for 
shooting. No better State could be se- 
lected. Oklahoma has just enacted one 
of the most liberal game breeders' laws 
and all species of game can now be 
profitably produced there. When a few 
good game farms and preserves are 
started the State should have a boom. 
Lands used for game can be made more 
profitable than lands used for cattle 
breeding or farming. The game, in fact, 
can be made to yield an additional rev- 
enue to the farms since many species 
are beneficial and the harm done by 
those which are harmful can be largely 
prevented by the use of scare boys and 
in other ways known to game farmers 
and preserve owners. 



THE GAME BREEDER 169 
THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 

Fourth Paper. 

BY D. W. HUNTINGTON. 

I have made excellent bags of prairie telephone poles as lookout places from 
grouse in many of the prairie states which they easily could see any moving 
when the birds were abundant. I had no object in the fields below. One can read- 
thoughts then of the necessity for pre- ily imagine that the grouse can not exist 
serving and paid very little attention to on wide areas planted with fall wheat 
the food habits of the birds, but, of since they have neither cover nor food 
course I observed that both the prairie at the time when they are most needed, 
grouse and the northern sharp-tailed It would be an easy and profitable 
grouse were more plentiful in certain matter to convert the great bonanza 
places where natural foods were abund- wheat farms into game preserves where 
ant and where the long grasses and the thousands of birds could be shot every 
wild roses offered protection from their season without danger of extermination, 
natural enemies. Wild sunflowers, wild Some of the land should be devoted to 
roses, sumac and the prairie grass were grass, wild roses, weeds, sumac and 
abundant in the places where the grouse other foods, and covers, and the better 
were most plentiful, aijd those who way would be to plant these foods and 
would restore the grouse and keep them covers in long strips between the fields 
plentiful should restore the prairie grass where the wheat is grown, 
and the other covers and foods men- The vast corn fields of Illinois, Kan- 
tioned, and still others referred to later, sas and other corn States have afforded 

When shooting in more recent years much protection to the grouse, but when 
on ground where corn and wheat were the corn is harvested the birds are ex- 
grown we found the birds in the stubbles posed to their natural enemies and the 
and corn fields and undoubtedly the grain introduction of prairie grass and rose 
constituted a large part of their autumn and other briars would result in saving 
and winter food. The birds easily could many birds. Their natural enemies 
be fed on grain in the winter and, hav- should be controlled, of course, to make 
ing proper cover including briars of the a place for the shooting. On the moors 
rose, blackberry and others, it should be of Scotland, since game keepers have 
an easy matter to preserve the game in been employed to exterminate the ver- 
cultivated regions, provided always they min, the grouse have increased in num- 
have grass for nesting sites. bers rapidly although thousands of birds 

The rose hips are a very important are shot every season, 

winter food since they can be procured Grouse should not be bred in captivity, 

above the snow and are said to be both They should be bred wild in protected 

grit and food. fields where the natural conditions have 

On many of the big wheat farms been restored, partly at least, 

where every sunflower and wild rose and Mr. Judd, in his excellent bulletin to 

every other cover and food including the which I have referred, has listed the 

prairie grass had been removed and foods of the prairie grouse and since 

where the grouse had no protection from the bulletin is out of print I shall quote 

their natural enemies, to which they from it at length. Those who would pre- 

were unduly exposed, they quickly dis- serve the grouse will find that if they 

appeared entirely throughout vast re- will restore some of the more important 

gions. I have tramped for miles over foods enumerated and if they will de- 

such ground without finding a single stroy some of the natural enemies of the 

grouse and I observed that the hawks grouse that it will be an easy matter to 

were plentiful, using the telegraph and. keep the birds plentiful and the shooting 



170 



THE GAME BREEDER 



good. Success surely will follow the 
restocking of thousands of miles of the 
former range of the grouse provided the 
work be undertaken in the proper way 
and competent game keepers be em- 
ployed to look after the game. 

Mr. Judd says for the purposes of his 
report the contents of 71 stomachs of 
prairie hens were examined. Fortun- 
ately this material represents not only 



the shooting season, but all other months 
except July. Most of the stomachs 
came from the Dakotas, Minnesota, 
Iowa, Wisconsin, Nebraska and Texas. 
Illinois and Ontario furnished the rest. 
The food consisted of 14.11 per cent, 
animal matter and 85.87 per cent, vege- 
table matter. The former was insects ; 
the latter seeds, fruit and grain, leaves, 
flowers and bud twigs. 

(To be continued.) 



ELEVEN IMPORTANT WILD DUCK FOODS. 

Fourth Paper. 
By W. L. McAtee. 



Eel-Grass. 

Value as Duck Food. 

Few who have written of the habits 
of sea brant have failed to mention its 
fondness for eel-grass. The relation be- 
tween this species of bird and plant 
seems to be as close as, if not closer 
than, that existing between the noted 
fresh-water pair, the canvasback duck 
and wild celery. So far as investiga- 
tions of the food of the brant are con- 
cerned the published record is thorough- 
ly substantiated. All normal stomach 
contents of the common brant thus far 
examined consisted exclusively of eel- 
grass. Other salt-water fowl also feed 
on eel-grass, as the surf and white- 
winged scoters. Six birds of the latter 
species collected at Netarts Bay, Oregon, 
had made 43 per cent, of their last meal 
of it. The list of other ducks feeding 
on the plant includes the golden-eye, old 
squaw, bufflehead, mallard and' black 
duck, the last-named species sometimes 
devouring the seeds of eel-grass in large 
numbers. The stomachs of 5 black ducks 
collected at Amityville, Long Island, N. 
Y., in October and November, contained 
on the average more than 66 per cent, 
of eel-grass seeds, the number of seeds 
per stomach varying from 700 to 4,000. 
Eleven birds taken at Scarboro, Me., 
during the same months had eaten 
enough eel-grass seeds to make up 51 
per cent, of their food. In three cases 
fully 2,000 seeds had been taken. Thir- 



teen ducks of the same species collected 
in Massachusetts in January and Febru- 
ary had taken eel-grass, including both 
seeds and leaves, to the extent of more 
than 11 per cent, of their food. The 
wigeon, a species which prefers foliage 
to the seeds and roots of aquatic plants, 
sometimes visits salt water to feed upon 
this plant. Five of these birds taken at 
South Island, Souh Carolina, in Febru- 
ary, had made one-fourth of their meal 
of the leaves of eel-grass. 

Description of Plcmt. 

Eel-grass (Zostera marina) consists 
of bunches of long tapelike leaves which 
rise from a jointed fibrous-rooted creep- 
ing stem (Fig. 13). The leaves bear a 
strong superficial resemblance to those of 
wild celery, but they are rarely more than 
a fourth of an inch wide, while those of 
wild celery are seldom as narrow. The 
leaf of eel-grass, furthermore, is tougher 
and more leathery than that of wild cel- 
ery. When a mature leaf is torn across, 
numerous white fibers may be seen at 
the broken ends. Wild celery lacks 
these. The color of eel-grass leaves is 
olive or dark green, that of wild celery 
clear light green.* 

The l eaves grow in small bundles 

*Unaer the microscope the leaves of these 
two plants are very unlike. The Chlorophyll 
granules of Zosteria are arranged in regular 
longitudinal rows, and the edge of the leaf is 
smooth. The Chlorophyll granules of Vallis- 
neria, on the contrary, are irregularly arranged 
and the edge of the leaf is sparingly beset with 
minute teeth. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



171 




from the end of the rootstock or its 
branches, and may reach a length of 6 
feet. The rootstocks, which usually are 
reddish, have joints about every half 
inch, at which they are easily broken. 
The numerous fibrous roots spring from 
these joints. Seeds of eel-grass are 
formed in sheaths alongside the leaves. 
They are about one-eighth of an inch in 
length, are placed end to end, and are 
barrel-shaped, with the surface conspic- 
uously longitudinally ribbed (Fig. 14). 
Eel-grass has numerous common names, 
among w;hich we may cite sea-wrack or 
grass-wrack, sea-, sweet-, barnacle-, 
turtle- and wigeon-grass. 

Distribution. 
Eel-grass is strictly a maritime spe- 
cies. In its natural habitat it is cosmo- 
politan. In North America it is found 
from Greenland to the Gulf of Mexico, 
and from Alaska to California. 

Propagation. 

This plant grows only in salt water. 
It is common along shores facing the 
open ocean, but also grows in bays and 



Fig. 14.— Seeds of Eel-grass. 

even lagoons where the water must be far 
less salt than the sea. The seeds are 
not well protected against drying and 
for that reason are unsuitable for trans- 
planting.^ Moreover, unless they can be 
^They undoubtedly can be preserved in cold 
storage in salt water, but considering the lim- 
ited use that can be made by seeds on account 
of the heavy wash along most shores, this 
probably would not be profitable, 
sown in a very quiet place the chances 
are against securing a catch. The root- 
stocks, however, are rather tough and 
resistant and, furthermroe, can be fas- 
tened to the bottom. They must not be 
allowed to dry, but should be shipped 
wet and handled as rapidly as possible. 
Bury or fasten to the bottom in water a 
few feet deep where there is little surf. 
Once established the plant will spread to 
more exposed areas. 



Fig. 13 —Eel-grass. 



More game and fewer game laws. 



172 



THE GAME BREEDER 



THE GRAYLING. 

By Hon. M. D. Baldwin, 
Game and Fish Commissioner of Montana. 



The game and fish commission having 
recently planted in the_ waters of Flat- 
head valley nearly a miflion grayling fry, 
it may be of some interest to the public 
to give a brief description of this beau- 
tiful fish known for its active and gamy 
qualities as well as for its delicious flavor. 
There are three species of the gray- 
ling found in American waters, the 
Michigan Arctic or Alaska, and Monta- 
na Grayling. The grayling agrees very 
closely with the Salmono idea in external 
character and habits, and they are re- 
garded by some as intermediate between 
the white fish and trout. Only the Mon- 
tana grayling receives the attention of 
fish culturists. Its technical name, "Thy- 
mallus tricolor montanus," is said to be 
due to the fact that it feeds on water- 
thyme — which it smells very strongly of 
when first taken out of the water. St. 
Ambrose, the bishop of Milan, calls the 
grayling "the flower of fishes," and the 
French call the grayling "ununble che- 
valier," and say he feeds on gold. 

There is no species of fish sought for 
by anglers that surpasses the grayling in 
beauty. They are more elegantly formed 
and more graceful than the trout. The 
caudal fin is strongly forked, its colora- 
tion is gorgeous and their great pluce- 
like dorsal fin is of remarkable beauty. 
The color of the back is dark grey, with 
purplish reflection ; the sides of the head 
and body are lighter, with purplish irri- 
discence; the belly is pure white, and 
there are a few v-shaped black spots on 
the anterior of the body; a dark heavy 
line, most distinct in males, extends 
along the upper border of the belly from 
ventral to pectoral fin. Its crowning 
glory, its immense plume-like dorsal fin, 
is dotted with large brilliant bluish pur- 
ple spots surrounded with splendid 
emerald green, which fade after death. 

The Montana grayling is native only 
in streams emptying into the Missouri 
river above the Great Falls, principally 



in Smith or Deep river and its tributaries 
in the Little Belt mountains, the Sun 
river, Jefferson, Gallatin and Madison 
rivers and their affluents. It prefers 
streams of clear cold water. The spawn- 
ing season of the Montana grayling is in 
April and May, depending upon the tem- 
perature of the water. In the North 
Fork of the Madison river the water is 
comparatively warm, and the grayling 
spawns a month earlier than in other 
waters of Montana. 

The artificial propagation of Montana 
grayling was begun at the United States 
Hatchery at Bozeman in 1898, and in 
1899 upwards of four and one-half mil- 
lion fry were distributed from this 
hatchery. The number of eggs varies 
from 2,000 to 4,000 to the fish. 

As to its game qualities, the Montana 
grayling is regarded as fully the equal of 
the brook trout and cut-throat trout. It 
puts up a good fight, and often leaps 
above the surface of the water when 
hooked. It takes the artificial fly, grass- 
hopper, angle worm and similar bait. 
The best artificial flies to use are those 
with bodies of peacock, or yellow-bodied 
flies, as Professor, Queen of the Water, 
brown and gray Hackle and the like. 
Small flies should be used on hooks Nos. 
10 and 12. Grayling may be taken from 
May to November, the best time being in 
the summer. The average size of this 
fish is from ten to fourteen inches in 
length, and from one-half to one pound 
in weight, although many attain a length 
of twenty inches and a weight of two 
pounds or more. 

The grayling is not native to the 
waters west of the Rocky mountains, but 
several years ago fry from the Bozeman 
hatchery were planted in Georgetown 
Lake, an artificial body of water about 
eighteen miles from Anaconda. This 
lake is nearly ten miles in length and 
about one mile in width, and the success 
of the grayling in this lake has been re- 



THE GAME BREEDER 173 

■maTkable. Georgetown Lake is now containing men like Judge Bickford and 

fairly alive with grayling, which afford E. P. Mathewson, who have so disin- 

rare sport to the Butte and Anaconda terestedly and zealously devoted their 

anglers. This lake is also well stocked time and best efforts towards making 

with cut-throat, rainbow and eastern Montana the best State in the Union for 

brook trout, and owing to the abundance those fond of the rod, gun and field 

of fresh water shrimp and other fish sports. 

food in the lake, there is no reason why Grayling fry have heretofore been 
its reputation as a fishing resort should planted in several of the streams of Flat- 
deteriorate, head county, but with what success we 

To Mr. E. P. Mathewson, chairman of are unable to say. Nearly three years 

the game and fish commission, more than ago. Grayling fry were planted in Bitter 

any other, is justly due the credit for Root Lake near Marion and to-day many 

the fish prosperity in Georgetown Lake, grayling are being caught in this lake. 

Hon. Walter M. Bickford, of Missou- Owing to the success of the grayling 
la, also a member of the fish and game in Georgetown as well as Bitter Root 
commission, has written a very interest- Lake, it is believed desirable to stock our 
ing article about the Montana grayling lakes with grayling as well as trout, 
which was published in the last annual hence the large consignment of grayling 
report of the American Fisheries society, just received from the Anaconda hatch- 
The anglers of Montana are indebted to ery will be planted in the lakes of Flat- 
Mr. Bickford for the good work he has head county, and it is the purpose of the 
accomplished in the matter of stocking game and fish commission to keep the 
the waters of Montana with trout and waters of Flathead county well stocked 
grayling, and it is with much gratifica- with grayling as well as other desirable 
tion to the writer to serve upon a board fish. 



THE MOUNTAIN QUAIL. 

By Harold C. Bryant. 

The mountain quail, sometimes known tain quail occurs about springs well out 

as the plumed quail or mountain part- on to the desert. 

ridge, is the largest and most beautiful From other quail found in California 
of all the members of the quail family the mountain quail may be distinguished 
found in North America. The bird is by its large size, rich chestnut throat and 
found throughout the mountainous dis- flanks, sides broadly banded with white, 
tricts of California from the Oregon line and by the long crest plume made up of 
to the Maxican line. Along the north- two jet black feathers. Whereas the 
west coast region this quail is of a darker crest of the valley quail hangs over the 
color and is, therefore, considered a dif- bill, that of the mountain quail is either 
ferent variety. This coast form is erect or pointed backward. The two 
usually called the mountain quail by sexes of the mountain quail are so near 
scientists, whereas the one found in the alike that the two are hard to separate 
Sierras is called the plume quail. As a unless a close view of the crest can be 
rule the mountain quail of the Sierras had. The crest of the female is con- 
dwells above 5,000 feet altitude, but dur- siderably shorter. 

ing the winter season it is found lower The mating season begins the latter 

down and sometimes even associated part of March or the first of April. By 

with valley quail. The coast form dwells May nests are to be found. They are 

at much lower altitudes. On the eastern constructed of leaves, pine needles or 

bases of the southern ranges the moun- grass placed in a small depression and 



174 



THE GAME BREEDER 



usually under the protection of an over- 
hanging rock, log, bush or tuft of grass. 
From six to fifteen eggs of a pale red- 
dish buff color are laid. The earliest 
date at which a complete set of eggs has 
been found is April 7, and the latest 
August 15. The usual statement that 
an egg is laid each day is probably not 
literally true, for, at least in one case, 
additional eggs were found in the nest 
every other day. 

During July and August young moun- 
tain quail are very much in evidence. 
They are cared for by one or both of 
the parents and some people believe that 
the male bird sometimes cares for a 
brood while the female is incubating a 
second set of eggs. The young, unlike 
adults, often take flight and seek cover 
in trees or brush. When well hidden 
one may almost step on the little fellows 
before they will fly. 

Mountain quail are noted for their al- 
titudinal migrations. Even before the 
snow begins to fall flocks of the birds 
may be seen traveling to lower altitudes. 
They travel almost wholly "on foot," 
usually following along the ridges. By 
October 1 most of them have abandoned 
elevations above 5,000 feet, and when 
the winter snows arrive they have found 
a habitat far more congenial. In the 
early spring and summer they begin their 
upward journey. At this time of year 
they are seldom seen in large flocks, but 
ascend singly or in pair and follow up 
the ridges as the snow melts from the 
ground. 

The food of the mountain quail con- 
sists very largely of vegetable matter — 
seeds, fruit and leaves. A very few 
grasshoppers, beetles and ants are taken. 
The mountain quail . is a vigorous 
scratcher and will jump a foot or more 
from the ground to nip off leaves. In 
the fall the service berry is a staple arti- 
cle of diet. 

The large size and exquisite coloring 
of the mountain quail make it an at- 



tractive bird to the hunter. Its flesh also 
is excellent, being declared juicier than 
that of the valley quail. The scarcity of 
birds and the difficulty attendant upon 
reaching their habitat alone deter many 
from hunting this quail. As a rule 
mountain quail when hunted in the brush 
run some distance before flying and then 
rise singly, so that only one can usually 
be killed at a shot. Hence a limit bag 
is hard to obtain. However, when these 
quail are numerous in the foothills dur- 
ing the winter they sometimes become 
so befuddled that they can be driven into 
a shed or cage and captured by hand. 

In former years mountain quail were 
very numerous and were commonly sold 
on the markets in San Francisco. They 
were trapped in the high Sierras and 
sent to the markets alive. 

Owing to the migratory movements of 
the mountain quail it is only just that 
the season open earlier in the foothills 
of the Sierras than in the coast region. 
Otherwise the birds are not available to 
the hunter on the western slope of the 
Sierra Nevada. In the coast region the 
migratory movements of this quail are 
not so noticeable and there is not the 
same necessity for an early season. 

The rapid diminution in the number 
of mountain quail has already given 
hunters and others considerable concern. 
A few years ago a close season of five 
years was given this bird. When the 
season was again opened an increase of 
birds was to be noted. Apparently the 
main thing needed with such a prolific 
species as the quail is proper protection. 
There should always be a home for the 
mountain quail, for it inhabits the uncul- 
tivated districts and is therefore not sub- 
ject to any great degree to the destruc- 
tive forces of encroaching civilization. 
A short season and small bag limit with 
an entire close season for a term of years 
when the species is too greatly reduced 
should be sufficient to ensure the per- 
manency of this beautiful game species. 



I 



'^^ 



THE GAME BREEDER 175 

CHINESE PHEASANTS. 

By Professor W. H. Olin, 

Industrial Commissioner D. L. & N. W. Ry. and Ex-Professor Agronomy, Colo- 
rado Agricultural College. 

The pheasant, especially the Chinese and doubtless many more will be found 

ring-neck and English varieties, are the to share in its menu, 

most valuable insectivorous birds, as well In addition to this it is especially fond 

as the most attractive and eagerly sought of small rodents, such as field mice, young 

game bird of all the species that can be gophers and small snakes. In England 

reared in captivity or in a semi-domestic a number of pheasants have been found 

way and be kept in the district in which choked to death in the attempt to swallow 

it is propagated. worms. larger or longer than they could 

The great majority in numbers and manage; also several pheasants have 

kinds of the insectivorous birds are mi- been found dead, choked on small 

gratory — are only with us a short time — rodents. 

while the pheasant, especially the kinds The keeper of most any large pheasan- 
above mentioned, become attached to try has seen his pheasants catch mice 
the locality and will breed and remain that were stealing the grain from the 
there as long as they are protected and birds. This is verified by Mr. Fred Bar- 
can secure food. nett, superintendent of the pheasantries 

Thousands of these gorgeously plumed at City Park, Denver, Colo. Mr. Barnett 

pheasants with a wealth of feathered says that a pheasant hen will catch and 

adornment, some of which shine in the destroy a mouse as quickly as a cock 

sunlight as burnished gold and bronze ol pheasant or cat, as he has frequently 

many shadings, with grace of form and watched them in the act. They usually 

carriage, (the private property of W. F. pick the head off first, then tear and eat 

Kendrick, in charge of his game keeper), the body or swallow the small ones 

are kept on exhibit at City Park, Denver, whole. 

for the education and entertainment of Among the insects destroyed by the 

the visitors. Thousands of tourists as pheasant are included smelling bugs, 

well as local people visit this exhibit and that most birds will not touch — this 

carry away many pleasant memories, makes these birds more valuable to the 

giving City Park an international reputa- farmer than any other, 

tion, yet few realize their economic Prominent among the pests ravenously 

value other than their beauty, which al- destroyed are the Colorado potato beetle, 

ways appeals to l^he finer sentiment and the squash bug, the cucumber beetle, the 

love of nature's inimitable handiwork, bean leaf beetle, tomato worms, cut 

Within another year the popularity of worms and the millers which deposit 

the pheasant because of its usefulness, the eggs for the wire worms. The pheas- 

which even exceeds its great beauty, will ant also digs for and eats the wire 

become extensively recognized through- worms, as it does all ground worms and 

out America. bugs, and practically all kinds of ground 

The pheasant is naturally an insectiv- beetles. Most birds avoid the potato 

orous bird, and where such food is ob- and other bad smelling bugs on account 

tainable he will eat comparatively little of their obnoxious odors, but the pheas- 

else. ant hunts and eats them. 

The variety of the insect food of the The Southern people are importing the 

pheasant is larger than any other bird, so pheasant to eat the cotton boll weevil 

far as known. Investigation showed that and its larvae, stating that one pheasant 

over 130 species of insects, including will eat as many of the destructive pest 

earthworms, are eaten by the pheasant, as a number of quail. Many of the in- 



176 



THE GAME BREEDER 



sects that are injurious to the corn crop 
are destroyed by the pheasant, and the 
pheasant will not attack the grain or ear 
of the corn until late in the season, after 
insect food is scarce. 

The professors of agronomy of our 
agricultural colleges state that the chinch 
bug, which destroys $100,000,000 worth 
of wheat annually, is hunted and eaten 
by the pheasant, both summer and win- 
ter; also the bugs and insects which de- 
stroy the foliage, especially of ground 
plants and crops of the farmer. 

The difference between the pheasant 
and the ordinary fowl in eating insects is 
largely that the pheasant is continually 
hunting for the eggs and larvae of in- 
sects. In the grain fields and meadows 
the insect eggs are usually laid on the 
under side of the leaves of the plants. 
The pheasant as it passes through the 
growing grain keeps its head near the 
ground and turns one eye up and the 
other down so it sees the larvae and 
eggs on the under side of the leaf. It 
takes hold of the leaf with its bill, throws 
its head up and clears the plant of the 
eggs and larvae without injuring the 
leaf ; thus in one stroke destroys four or 
five or possibly one hundred embryo in- 
sects and in a single meal often destroys 
many thousands of insects in the egg and 
larvae form, which, when matured, 
would have destroyed a large amount of 
crops, and furnish enough bug food for 
a turkey gobbler for several years. The 
pheasant destroys the pests before they 
do any damage to the farmer's crops ; the 
turkey and common poultry afterward. 

Pheasants are fond of grasshopper 
eggs, especially those of the locust, that 
deposit their eggs in the earth in dry 
places, and also larvae of any insect that 
may be found there. Pheasants in cap- 
tivity have been known to dig up light 
ground, where there were many larvae, 
so that they dug under the fence four 
inches in the ground. On examination 
this ground was found to contain insect 
eggs and larvae of insects. 

The pheasant chooses the dandeHon 
and the bulbs of buttercups as two of its 
greatest vegetable delicacies. He eats 
but comparatively few buds from bushes 
and trees, excepting in severe winters. 



In this way he is quite different from the 
grouse. Of the grasses he has liking for 
white and red clover, alfalfa and red and 
yellow sorrel, but when there are plenty 
of dandelions and buttercups he will 
make those his principal vegetable diet. 
In the winter time pheasants can be 
seen turning over forest leaves and ex- 
amining them and picking off the larvae 
of different tree insects deposited on the 
under side of the leaves ; also picking 
over the top soil around bushes and trees 
for the bugs and larvae. 

Along the streams and wet grounds 
the pheasant finds many snails and crus- 
tations for food. The pheasant being a 
terrestrial, it eats mostly from the 
'ground or within twelve inches of same 
when food is abundant, and seldom eats 
grain, such as wheat, oats and barley, 
until late in the season, after it has been 
harvested and threshed, when insect life 
is scarce. It cleans up the grain stubble 
fields, being especially fond of buck- 
wheat, millet and common ordinary 
wheat, and when hungry will eat most 
any kind of grain, including beans. 

Tegetmeier says: "The value of 
pheasants to the agriculturist is scarcely 
sufficiently appreciated ; the birds destroy 
enormous numbers of injurious insects — ■ 
upwards of 1,200 wire worms have been 
taken out of the crop of a pheasant; if 
this number was consumed in a single 
meal the total destroyed must be almost 
incredible. 

"There is no doubt that insects are 
preferred to grain. One pheasant shot 
at the close of the shooting season had 
in his crop 726 wire worms, one acorn, 
one snail, 9 berries and 3 grains of wheat. 
From the crop of another pheasant 440 
grubs of the crane fly and the daddy- 
longlegs — these larvae are exceedingly 
destructive to luscous vegetables. From 
the crop of another pheasant 48 snail 
shells were taken. Eight young vipers, 
weighing about one-fourth of an ounce 
each, were taken from the crop of a nen 
pheasant. 

"An instance is reported in the Lon- 
don field of a pheasant which, when 
found, had swallowed about six inches 
of a viper, whilst about eight inches of 
the tail part of the reptile was protrud- 



THE GAME BREEDER 177 

ing from the mouth of the bird ; both The Feathered World, London ; Frank 
the bird and the viper were dead. Finn, F. Z. S., says : "The Chinese 
"Another instance is recorded of a pheasant, Hke his human fellow country- 
pheasant which, on being killed, had no men, is very hardy, and will thrive any- 
less than 1,225 leather jackets — a most where, bearing the cold of a northern 
destructive larvae — in its crop. United States winter and the heat of a 
It is fond of carrots, potatoes, beets, Bengal summer quite well. It is also a 
cabbage and turnips in the winter time good breeder and bears confinement 
although if dandelions are fed to caged well.'' 

pheasants they will eat them in prefer- The government statistics show that 

ence to most any vegetable food, roots the damages done to. the growing crops 

and all. by insect pests, largely owing to the de- 

The pheasant is also very fond of struction of insectivorous birds, is esti- 

many of the wild weed seeds, such as mated at something like $800,000,000 per 

legumes, thistles, especially the burr this- annum. This amount would feed and 

tie, wild carrots, sunflowers, wild lettuce, care for many millions of pheasants and 

mayweed, marsh elder and mustard other insectivorous birds, 

seeds. At the last annual meeting of the New 

As a table food, and also as a game York Zoological Society $60,000 was 

bird, the pheasant has been held as the given to be used entirely for the study of 

leading bird for these two qualities by pheasants and the best methods to be 

the kings, royalty, wealth and educated adopted for the introduction and distrib- 

people of the world for more than two uting of these birds into the United 

thousand years "as being of the greatest States. 

sport and richest delicacy. No other In a number of States the next Legis- 
bird has held such a position, and it will lature will be asked to pass liberal ap- 
be a long time before any other bird can propriations for propagating the pheas- 
gain such distinction. ant and other insectivorous and game 
The home of the Chinese ring-neck is birds and the distribution of literature to 
largely in the mountains, as well as in instruct and aid the people in the hatch- 
the valleys of China, and they are ac- ing of the eggs and rearing of the birds 
customed to very severe weather, as it about their country homes, 
inhabits the high altitudes, and yet If every farmer, landowner and bird- 
adapts itself to the lower altitudes, as lover in the country would either secure 
low as sea level. It is a thoroughbred a setting of pheasant eggs and hatch 
bird and has been imported into England them under a common hen and rear them 
in considerable numbers to breed up the like young chickens, or buy a pair of 
English pheasant. these birds, the problem of how to de- 
Chinese ring-neck pheasants are doing stroy insects would soon be solved, and 
well, liberated in the mountains of Colo- I would recommend that farmers avail 
rado up to 9,000 feet altitude. themselves of this economic opportunity. 



FUR FARMING. 

J. E. Briggs. 

Fur farming for profit, or the success- and, and now this industry alone has 
ful raising of fur-bearing animals in cap- extended to the country adjacent thereto 
tivity has now passed the experimental and grown to large proportions, hence 
stage ; the average well-informed man we find that fur farming is rapidly corn- 
has heard of the fabulous fortunes made ing to its own, and will in the future 
during the past decade in the raising of form a splendid field of labor for many 
silver black foxes on Prince Edward Isl- intelligent young men who possess a 



178 



THE GAME BREEDER 



fondness for healthful country life and 
a warm place in their hearts for the 
most beautiful and interesting of our 
country's fast disappearing wild animal 
life. 

In years gone by our sturdy pioneers 
depended largely upon the furs of wild 
animals for clothing for themselves and 
families and also for the furnishing of 
their homes. While the march of prog- 
ress has made these same furs largely 
articles of adornment, the advent of the 
automobile and its general use together 
with the increasing custom and desire 
for out of door Hfe adds an ever-grow- 
ing demand for fine, warm furs. 

The ever onward rush of our civiliza- 



tion, the converting of nature's "silent 
places" into the haunts of. men has nat- 
urally crowded our fur bearers back like 
"Lo the poor Indian" almost to their 
extinction, therefore it becomes impera- 
tive that man come to their assistance if 
this and future generations are to wear 
furs. 

Surely the practical fur farmer has a 
golden opportunity before him. 

[The propagation of fur bearing animals 
requires the same amount of industry which is 
needed to save the game and make it plentiful 
and cheap in the markets. Since the fur 
bearers are destructive to game many of them 
should be bred in captivity. Where the fox is 
preserved as a sporting proposition he should 
be bred wild. — The Editor.! 



THE CALIFORNIA VALLEY QUAIL AND INTRODUCED 

GAME BIRDS. 

By George Neale, 

Assistant, California Fish and Game Commission. 



Civilization and population forcing it- 
self westward and into communities 
where game is or was once abundant, 
make new measures necessary in order 
to protect the existing game fauna of 
California. When these measures are 
not taken, history shows that certain 
species, those most easily killed or cap- 
tured and those whose -reproduction is 
less prolific, will be eventually extermi- 
nated. 

The band-tailed pigeon is a good ex- 
ample of a species nearing extinction. 
This bird was once almost as numerous 
in California as the passenger pigeon 
was in the eastern and middle states. 
Only a remnant of the former numbers 
now remains. The records of the cloud- 
obscuring flights of the passenger pigeon 
seem like a fable, except to those who 
have seen and know. The few remain- 
ing mourning doves, once so numerous 
in California, furnish another example of 
the passing of species. The western 
mourning dove, sometimes called Caro- 
lina dove, is nearly as strictly migratory 
as waterfowl. Especially in northern 
California is the dove a resident species. 
It nests throughout the State but its win- 



ter home is the southwestern portion of 
the United States as far as Mexico. The 
writer has seen the fall migration through 
New Mexico and along the line, of the 
Mexican Central Railroad from the Rio 
Grande nearly to Mexico City. It is 
true that some doves remain in the south- 
ern valley portion of the State the whole 
year, as do a few migratory ducks and 
other birds. 

Our laws have not given the dove 
proper protection. We have permitted 
them to be killed in the nesting season 
and on the nesting grounds, in what we 
term the open season. If this killing 
were permitted on the northern breeding 
grounds of the ducks and other water- 
fowl, what a protest would be made 
from California ! From my own obser- 
vation it is a conservative statement to 
say that the dove and band-tailed pigeon 
have decreased eighty per cent, in north- 
ern and central California in the last 
twenty-five years. 

The most flagrant cause of the near 
extermination of species is to be found 
in the unthinking or uncaring attitude of 
the people of the State. An added fac- 
tor to be considered is the fact that cer- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



179 



tain species are not prolific in their repro- 
duction, rarely having more than one or 
two eggs. Hence, in many seasons the 
whole, or at least part of the total in- 
crease of these birds may be destroyed 
by predatory animals or by human beings. 
This is true not only of the family Co- 
lumbidas to which the dove and pigeon 
belong but of the family Ardeidse (egrets, 
herons, etc.) which are so much sought 
for by plume hunters, especially in the 
mating season. These birds are of a 
confiding nature, easily approached on the 
nest, and so make an easy prey to the 
gunner or netter. Consequently, our ef- 
forts should be .centered in protecting 
those birds which are under natural dis- 
advantages. But this is not enough : all 
of our game birds need to be intelligently 
conserved. 

The protection now given many spe- 
cies of migratory birds by the United 
States Department of Agriculture have a 
beneficial effect in perpetuating those 
birds not entirely exterminated. 

The only game bird that has proved 
itself able to survive in the face of all 
the obstacles presented by encroaching 
civilization is the California valley quail 
(Lophortyx calif ornica). This bird is 
able to care for himself under any and 
all existing conditions if given a square 
deal. It adapts itself readily to all con- 
ditions, and is the peer of any game bird 
in the world. This bird is also capable 
of taking the conceit out of any cham- 
pion at the traps, and makes a dog well- 
trained on other game look like a tyro. 
It uses judgment in flight, when flushed, 
which a military expert would call mas- 
terly ; and even when wounded it shows 
all the qualities of a strategist. Always 
willing to match its brains against those 
of the gunner, it, in most instances, 
meets with success. In egg production 
the valley quail excels all other game 
birds, not excepting the pheasant, part- 
ridge, grouse or sage hen, scarcely ever 
laying less than eighteen eggs at one year 
old, and at three years frequently laying 
twenty-two or more eggs. Furthermore, 
it usually succeeds in hatching and rais- 
ing all or a very large percentage, and 
frequently hatches a second brood. This 
is nearly always the case if the first nest 



is destroyed. Quail eat almost any seed 
or wild berry. Noxious weed seeds are 
destroyed in great numbers ; hence they 
are most useful birds to the farmer, 
orchardist or vineyardist. I believe the 
quail ranks highest as an insectivorous 
game bird. 

The quail is one of the only game 
birds which is attracted by civilization, 
and if not molested this bird will make 
its home near a farm cottage. The val- 
ley quail is king of all he surveys, pug- 
nacious to a high degree, and will hold 
his own against any other bird encroach- 
ing on his domain. He is always true to 
his mate, is invariable non-polygamous 
and always chooses his own mate in 
captivity or freedom. This bird 
has survived a four months' open 
season with a bag limit of twenty per 
day, or 140 per week. It has been 
hunted with the best dogs in the world, 
chased with something like 121,664 au- 
tomobiles fully armed, and rapid fire 
automatic and. pump guns in the hands 
of 159,164 hunters. It is surely a mar- 
vel that any of these birds still remain. 

The range of the valley quail in north- 
ern California is from sea level to 3,000 
feet above, rarely ever being found above 
this elevation. The valley quail is not 
migratory, except under adverse food 
conditions. Only at times do they wan- 
der far from their feeding grounds, and 
they invariably return each season to the 
place where they were raised. 

In over thirty years' experience in the 
field with this bird, from the south line 
of its range to its northern limits, I 
have never seen a sick or diseased valley 
quail. They are strong moulters, and 
this perhaps insures their being practi- 
cally immune from disease. Of all the 
gallinaceous birds, Lophortyx calif ornica 
is the fittest representative of the game 
bird family. Hence he will continue to 
prove the survival of the fittest. If the 
time ever arrives in California when all 
our game is on the verge of extermina- 
tion, this grand game bird will be one of 
the last to disappear. 

Our efforts to aveft this rapid exter- 
mination of bird life by the introduction 
of new species of game birds into Cali- 
fornia has not met with success commen- 



180 



THE GAME BREEDER 



surate with the expenditures of money. 
One reason for this may be the pugnacity 
of native game species. Wherever other 
varieties of game birds not native to 
California have been introduced on 
lands where California valley quail live, 
failure has always followed. This bird 
will always fight against the usurpation 
of his territory by other birds. It will 
attack a cock pheasant as readily as a 
small bird.- Hence there are good rea- 
sons why it should be the one dominant 
game bird. 

The following instance of pugnacity 
on the part of the valley quail has come 
to my notice. Mr. Hollenbeck, of Ryei 
Island, California, who is a great lover 
of birds and animals, encouraged a large 
band of quail to remain on his land by 
prohibiting shooting. He fed the birds 
every few days, and they became so ' 
tame that they even came inside the 
house when called. In fact, they were 
so tame as to almost be a nuisance. 
Knowing Mr. Hollenbeck's fondness for 
birds, I obtained for him some ring- 
necked pheasants. The quail, however, 
have driven away these pheasants, so 
that they are now to be found only in 
localities where quail are not found. 

There may still be another reason why 
introduced game has not increased. Many 
people believe that all that is necessary 
in the introduction of a game bird into 
any locality is just a matter of securing 
the species to be introduced, giving the 
birds their liberty and awaiting favor- 
able results. But the fact that a Master 



Hand has not only distributed game 
birds and animals, but has adjusted the 
flora and fauna of the universe to cer- 
tain life zones most suited to their ex- 
istence, is often overlooked. We must 
know the conditions and seek to intro- 
duce such birds as will thrive under 
them. No game bird has as yet been 
introduced into California which has 
proven to be adapted to the geographical 
and climatic conditions obtaining here. 

One of the principal reasons for our 
failure in the introduction of game 
birds in the past has been that none but 
ground-roosting birds have been selected. 
As a result they have been attacked^ by 
predatory animals. These latter are 
possibly of a larger variety and more 
numerous in California than in any other 
State. The valley quail has at some 
time had to adapt itself to these condi- 
tions. This bird is now a tree or bush- 
roosting bird, and this makes it practi- 
cally immune from the depredations of 
these numerous animals. On the other 
hand the Hungarian partridge, bobwhite, 
pheasant and other quails are ground- 
roosting birds. Therefore these birds 
are subject to depredations from the 
many animals which roam and feed at 
night and cannot obtain the foothold 
which they should in CaHfornia. 

Let us keep in mind our experiences 
of the past and see that birds more 
suited to our conditions are introduced 
— or, better still, that such hardy birds 
as the California valley quail are sufifi- 
ciently protected to make stocking with 
foreign game birds unnecessary. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



One of our New York wild duck 
breeders writes : "1 have a great deal of 
trouble with the wire enclosures which 
I had for my ducks as the wire rots out 
in one season when it is in the water. 
Can you tell me where we can get the 
best wire for this purpose? I have the 
regular one-inch galvanized mesh wire 
but it does not seem to be much good." 

The letter was referred to the supply 



department. There seems to be two 
methods of galvanizing wire one of 
which is much better than the other. 
It has been said that none of the galvan- 
ized wire made recently is as good as 
the wire made a few years ago, and that 
most of it rusts quickly. We should 
know what wire is the best and we shall 
be glad to hear from our readers if any 
of them have found a wire which will 



THE GAME BREEDER 181 

stand moisture for several seasons with- the breeders are not eager to have it 
out rusting. Our idea is that readers known how much game they own. They 
of The Game Breeder should have the do not care to have game officers visit 
best of everything from guns and am- them and arrest them or threaten them 
munition to pole traps, coops and wire as has been done in some instances. Al- 
and other appliances. We are quite sure though they believe, as we do, that they 
they are getting the best game birds and own the food they produce, they are 
eggs from our advertisers and we shall aware that some ignorant game officers 
be glad to know what wire is the best, are still inclined to make trouble. Un- 
This only can be determined by those der these circumstances it is highly im- 
who use wire. portant that we should not publish the 

— names of hundreds of breeders and we 

A member of the Fishers Island Club have decided to only pubUsh the total 

says : "Our pheasants at the club were amount of game owned by breeders in 

doing very well indeed and we had over ^^e different States 

2,800 young birds growing well, but a j^ -^ gratifying to observe that there 

few days ago the same disease struck j^ ^ |^^j^/^ %^ ^f sentiment 

?1T1^^ 1 '^ ^^^l' ^u'^^uJ'" throughout the country and that outside 
sect that they pick up on the shrubbery ^^ ^ %^ benighted regions where old- 
cleans them out at the rate of about a f^g^ioned gami officers still hold office, 
hundred a day and there seems to be no ^^ objection is made to the game breed- 
cT/find 5^^^'^^'"^ ^^'' '"'^'^ *^^ '""^ ing industry. In many places it has be- 
rp, ■ ■ ,, u u 1, • J.- J. J t. come popular and is favored not onlv 

ihis matter should be investigated by , ^t, u „„<. ^^^^ <-^ ^.,+ u^■,^■ \^\r 

.u T3 r A • 1 T J ^ r ^1- by those who get game to eat but by 

the Bureau of Animal Industry of the . „ u f^^A t-u^ "^„^^fl^„." o,,/ 

TTCA-ii. 1-nv .. ^ sportsmen who nnd the overflow sur- 

U. b. Agricultural Department. • • i ^.4. *.• 

*' _ ^ prismgly attractive. 

Notes for our game census are com- ^ , _ ,. ~ . , 

ing in more rapidly than they did at O^^ of our Califorma readers writes 

first. We are surprised at many of the that he purchased several thousand wild 

returns. People we believe had only a ^uck eggs last spring ivom our adver- 

few birds report a few hundred. There ^^^ers m three Eastern States. He says 

are far more in the thousand class than o^^ large lot of eggs froni a New Eng- 

we thought there were. Anv one who ^^nd State came through m good condi- 

visits the game breeders and club pre- tion and that sixty-five per cen-t. of the 

serves where there were a few birds last ^SS^ hatched. Another lot of eggs did 

year will often be surprised at the big ^^'^^Y well but one lot of a few hundred 

numbers this season if he visits the e?gs purchased from a third dealer did 

breeding grounds. This is especially "o* produce a single duck. He thinks 

true of the small breeders who are breed- the eggs were held too long before being 

ing for commercial purposes. It also is shipped and that they were shipped too 

true of many small clubs and individual ^^te m the season. As he says m his 

preserves. The number of these is increas- ^^tter Eastern breeders when they receive 

ing rapidly. Our readers are again re- orders from California and other distant 

quested to send in their reports of the States should ship their eggs quickly 

amount of game they own. A post-card after they are laid and they should also 

will do. We are sending out thousands send eggs laid early. 

of letters and thousands of extra copies Contracts for eggs should specify the 

of The Game Breeder but the truth of date of dehvery. It is certainly unfair 

the matter is the work is much bigger, to accept an order for eggs early in the 

more difficult and expensive than we be- season and to not deliver the eggs until 

lieved it would be. June. We had a complaint about such a 

= late shipment of a few thousand pheas- 

In many States which have not yet ant eggs which went to one of the Cen- 

enacted our game breeders' laws we find tral States. 



182 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^f Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER, 1915 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

OUR GAME CENSUS. 

Work on the game census is proceed- 
ing rapidly and we are more and more 
surprised as the returns come in at the 
amount of game now owned by indi- 
vidual breeders, game farms and shoot- 
ing clubs. When Charles Hallock, the 
dean of sportsmen, wrote us stating that 
in his opinion our long fight for more 
game and fewer game laws had been 
won we could hardly believe that this 
keen old observer was right. The game 
law industry in many States which re- 
sulted in* the enactment of hundreds of 
new restrictions appeared to be still 
flourishing and at times it seemed to 
offset the game breeders'enactments. We 
were not fully aware how many breeders 
there were in some States where the in- 
dustry had been legalized and we were 
not as fully posted as we now are about 
hundreds of game breeders in States 
where they appear to be conducting their 
industry without waiting for the enact- 
ment of breeders' laws. 

It appears that hundreds of thousands 
of game eggs were sold by breeders last 
spring and since the increase of game is 
geometrical when it is properly looked 
after it is safe to say that in two or three 
years at most America will be the biggest 
game producing country in the world. 

The pheasants and wild ducks appear 
to be the most abundant according to re- 



turns thus far received but this is quite 
natural since in some States it still is 
criminal to look after quail and grouse 
profitably. 

There are, however, hundreds of thou- 
sands of quail on the game farms and 
preserves conducted by our readers and 
the bags run over a thousand birds at 
many places. 

Enough elk and deer are now owiied 
by breeders to quickly supply the New 
York markets with venison as soon as 
the law permits the sale of this desirable 
food. 

The figures of our census will prove 
a valuable aid to those interested in se- 
curing permissive legislation. They 
should disarm the pessimists who lament 
the loss of the game and seek large ap- 
propriations in order to secure more re- 
strictions. 



MORE GAME IN MINNESOTA. 

No good reason can be assigned why 
Minnesota, the land of sky-tinted waters, 
with its thousands of lakes and ponds 
which reflect the image of the sky, should 
not have wild fowl, grouse, quail and 
other game birds and venison cheap and 
plentiful in the markets during six 
months every year. There is an abund- 
ance of land and water suitable to the 
game which was abundant and if a very 
small part of the vast area of the State 
can be utilized to profitably produce the 
desirable food the State game depart- 
ment can be made of great economic im- 
portance, the people can have plenty 
of game to eat at moderate prices and 
the sportsmen of all classes will be tre- 
mendously benefited as they have been 
in other States which have enacted game 
breeders' laws and which are already be- 
ginning to have game for sale in their 
markets. 

There is no reason why the sportsmen 
should continually face an impending 
prohibition of sport. They should get 
busy and go in for "more game and 
fewer game laws." 

We refer especially to Minnesota be- 
cause it appears just now there is a 
movement in that State for the profitable 
production of game. The other States 



THE GAME BREEDER 



183 



which do not permit and encourage game 
breeding should of course enact a game 
breeders' law as many of the States have. 



FAITH AND WORKS. 

We are gratified at the increasing 
number of letters endorsing the maga- 
zine which come in the rnail from new 
readers. 

We print in this issue part of a long 
letter received from a Virginia reader 
who says The Game Breeder is the best 
magazine he has ever read. 

It always occurs to us when we read 
these voluntary testimonials that the 
magazine is by no means what it should 
be and what it can be made provided 
our readers will back up their faith with 
works. Many of them are doing this. 
They not only tell their friends about 
the magazine but they take their money 
and send it, with the request that we add 
the new names to our subscription list. 
Not a week passes without our receiving 
such orders and they are most encourag- 
ing. 

We hope our readers will always bear 
in mind the fact that the magazine can 
be made far better, far more influential 
than it is when the number of our read- 
ers is increased and we have the money 
to do the necessary work. 

Our advertisers write often to say the 
magazine is "it," or words to that ef- 
fect. We are always glad to learn that 
they are getting good returns. If they 
did not we should not want them and 
we are quite sure they would not want 
us. It is important, therefore, for those 
interested in the "more game" campaign 
to deal only with those who advertise. 
It is not a bad plan to sign all letters, 
"Yours for more game." 



United States has attempted to empha- 
size the fact that we all are people of 
one country and that we should exercise 
common sense and the spirit of fair play 
in dealing with each other. Those who 
make a business of tinkering with game 
laws, however, have arranged to have 
pheasants and other wild foods shipped 
to the New York markets from foreign 
countries but they say no American 
farmer can ship such food to this mar- 
ket unless he lives within the State. He 
can buy the eggs and hatch the birds 
but he must keep them and not ship 
them. 

A budding young statesman once said 
to the writer, "This is protection, good 
Republican doctrine, you know." Good 
Republican damned nonsense, we ob- 
served (in an undertone, however), be- 
cause at the time we hoped to convert 
the bud who had a vote on a pending 
measure intended to put an end to the 
absurdity. To state that the law is in- 
tended to be a protection to the New 
York farmers, who now sell their food 
in New York, is to point out the fact 
that the law is clearly unconstitutional, 
because the Constitution says citizens 
of the several States shall enjoy equal 
rights and immunities. The only way 
such laws are ever held to be constitu- 
tional is to do a little lying about them 
and say they are not intended as dis- 
criminations, protecting residents, but 
that they are purely police regulations 
intended to save wild food birds which 
might be stolen or eaten. 



TOO BAD! TOO BAD! 

The game keeper of one of the game 
breeding associations in Pennsylvania 
writes to know if they can send game to 
the New York market. We believe the 
courts would say yes to this inquiry, but 
the New York laws say no, and absurd 
as "the fool" law seems, it might be 
e.xecuted. The Constitution of the 



MORE LAWS OR MORE GAME? 

We are strongly of the opinion that 
the sportsmen who gather at State con- 
ventions are likely to succeed in getting 
what they want. If, for example, they 
decide to get more game laws restricting 
or prohibiting field sports they may ac- 
quire a vast number of these laws. At 
the Maine convention one of the orators 
deplored the fact that they seemed likely 
to restore the 700 local laws which were 
repealed a short time .ago. 

Of course the game politicians are in- 
terested in seeing that the sportsmen get 
what they want provided they are will- 






184 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ing to stand for increased revenues, and 
more wardens to see that the laws are 
executed. When the sportsmen become 
aware, as they have in some States, that 
a great variety of restrictive laws 
does not result in an increase of game ; 
when they become aware that so long as 
any good shooting is permitted such 
legislation can not produce good re- 
sults but that it must result in extermi- 
nation, they no doubt will decide to 
go in for fewer laws and for "more 
game." In many places where the 
profitable production of game has been 
encouraged by legislation the sports- 
men who look after the game shoot big 
bags during long open seasons and they 
sell some of the game to help pay ex- 
penses. The result is that much of the 
game on the "noisy sanctuaries" departs 
to restock the surrounding country and 
the producers being fair minded and lib- 
eral are glad to see the game shot on 
unprotected areas, and they are glad to 
see the laws restricting sport repealed 
so that the shooting seasons can be long 
for every one. The shooting on Long 
Island, quite near New York, is improv- 
ing because a number of clubs keep up 
the stock of game. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I promised to let you know how the 
experiment with duck eggs from the 
East turned out. 

One lot, shipped here fairly early, 
hatched fairly well — sixty-five per cent, 
of the total number. The next lot, two 
weeks later and not carefully packed, 
hatched only fifteen per cent. Still later 
we hatched twenty-five per cent. These 
eggs were from Connecticut. 

The best results were with an incu- 
bator, and quail eggs in the machine at 
the same time made an eighty per cent, 
hatch. 

A lot of eggs from Wisconsin pro- 
duced only eight per cent. 

A lot of 300, shipped from New York 
on June 30th, and all placed in an incu- 
bator, failed to show life in a single egg. 
A few quail eggs in the machine for the 



same period all hatched to-day. Do you 
think I should pay for this lot of eggs? 

My conclusions from the experiment 
are that if the eggs are shipped from the 
East while still fresh, and early in the 
season, with some care on the part of 
the express company, they can be 
hatched here and produce good birds. 

I certainly wish to try it another year 
on a large scale, if I can have any as- 
surance of obtaining the eggs early, and 
that they will be sent as fast as gathered 
instead of being held there a couple of 
weeks to accumulate a large number. It 
is a long way to send them and the deal- 
ers ought to give special consideration 
to a customer at this distance, instead of 
leaving him till the last. There is a great 
field for this business here as the wild 
ducks have greatly diminished in number. 
It is the lack of a home-breeding stock 
which has made the mallard a scarce 
bird here although it furnished a large 
part of the shooting ten years ago. 
Very truly, 
California. C. H. Shaw. 

The Best. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

The July and August numbers of The 
Game Breeder came duly to hand. Al- 
low me to state it is the best magazine 
of its kind I have ever read, and my 
hope is that it will reach all the good 
sportsmen in the country, and that even 
those who are not sportsmen will read it 
and become interested and that it will 
open their eyes to the vanishing game of 
our country and they will talk the subject 
up with their neighbors and co-operate 
to save what is left by propagation and 
protection. D. H. Selden. 

Richmond, Va. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I have just renewed my subscription 
to The Game Breeder. 

I have not forgotten that you asked 
me to write something of my experience 
with American green-wing teal ducks in 
captivity. I have a female teal duck in- 
cubating now on 6 or 7 eggs and barring 
accidents I shall be successful I think 
this year. Last year I got fertile eggs 



THE GAME BREEDER 



185 



but so thin-shelled nothing short of an 
incubator could hatch them, but this 
year I solved that problem and my eggs 
look to have good shells. I will write an 
article for The Game Breeder in a few 
weeks and I think I have learned some 
things about teal, at least, that are not 
found in any of the books on the breed- 
ing and rearing of wild ducks. 

A. F. Warren. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I am interested in anything pertaining 
to bird or wild animal life, and I pre- 
dict for you great success, both for your 
paper and the Game Conservation So- 
ciety. 

Denver, Colo. W. F. Kendric. 

A DEER TROUBLE. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

In reply to your inquiry as to how I 
keep and feed my deer I will say that I 
keep them in a four-acre lot of natural 
timber of several different kinds of 
trees, such as oak, elm, ash, basswood 
and box elder, but the trees are large so 
the deer cannot reach very many of their 
leaves. And the ground is covered with 
all kinds of weeds that would grow in 
natural timber, also wild gooseberries 
and buck bushes. It seems to me it 
would be an ideal place for them. They 
have plenty of salt and fresh water. 

In winter I give them clover hay and 
cornmeal and bran mixed with a little 
condition powder that is recommended 
for horses, cattle and sheep. The lot 
they run in also contains blue grass, tim- 
othy and white clover. They show no 
symptoms of sickness and will eat well 
until they get so weak that they cannot 
stand up. The season of the year don't 
seem to make any difference. 

My deer are the North American 
white-tailed deer or natives of this part 
of the country. My idea of the matter 
is that they get too much blue grass and 
timothy and would do better in a dry 
lot the whole year round. 

When I bought these deer they were 
kept in a small lot that did not contain 
any green vegetation and they were fed 
alfalfa hay and bran and meal. They 



were sleek and fat but when I turned 
them in my lot they just seemed to go 
downward until I have lost about half 
of them. 

I also have a herd of buffalo and would 
like to know if they require salt or not. 
My buffalo are in very fine condition at 
present. 

John Reinhart. 

[We believe the trouble must be with the 
food (possibly with the condition ponder). 
The fact that the place is overgrown with 
weeds and gooseberries indicates that the deer 
do not eat these. If they did they would 
soon clear the lot. Evidently they can not 
reach the trees and they certainly would do 
better in a brush lot full of small trees. Mr. 
James W. Greggs, a successful Iowa breeder, 
says "blue grass and timothy are useless." He 
plants red clover, mustard, rape and seeds of 
different kinds of weeds and says corn is the 
principal grain he feeds. A number of deer 
breeders say that pure running water is highly 
desirable for deer. Mr. Reinhart's letter has 
been submitted to a number of successful deer 
breeders and we hope to print their opinions 
as to the cause of the trouble. — Editor.] 

[We hope to print the article referred to in 
our October number. — Editor.] 



What do you know about this? At 
the Minnesota State Fair we understand 
$250 will be given in prizes for wool 
and $900 for dog prizes. — Rural New- 
Yorker. 

Quite a sporting affair. — Game 
Breeder. 

• 

Lady (at the telephone) — I want my 
husband, please. 

Voice from the Exchange — What 
number, please? 

Lady — He's my third, if you wish to 
know, you impudent thing. — Australa- 
sian. 

♦ 

"Why do you think he has a family 
tree?" 

"Because he's a nut." 



"Is that dog of yours intelligent?" 
"Yessuh," replied Erastus Pinkley. 
"He kin do everything but talk, an' 
sometimes when he's heen out late wif 
me in de evenin' I's kind o' skeered dat 
he might take a sudden notion to do 
dat." — Washington Star. 



186 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Our Game Census. 

Returns for the game census are com- 
ing steadily but not as rapidly as we 
would like to see them. Some days only 
three or four breeders report. The spe- 
cial reporters at work in several States 
soon will bring up the number and we" 
hope to publish the result in our special 
fall number, October. 

One of the reports which came to-day 
from California is especially interesting 
because of the variety of birds owned 
by the breeder. We are quite sure Mr. 
A. J. Merle will not object to our pub- 
lishing his list. We hope it will result 
in stirring up the more tardy breeders 
who can save us hundreds of dollars if 
they will send their reports in response 
to our printed notices without waiting 
to hear from our special enumerators. 
Mr. A. J. Merle (and not the State) 
owns the following: 

Mountain Quail 4 

Valley Quail 4 

Ringnecked Pheasants .... 3 
Prince of Wales Pheasants 3 

Versicolor Pheasants 4 

Silver Pheasants 5 

Reeves Pheasants 2 

Milanotos Pheasants 3 

Impeyan Pheasants 2 

Tragopan Pheasants 2 

Manchurian Pheasants .... 3 

Golden Pheasants 3 

Swinhoe Pheasants ........ 3 

Amherst Pheasants 2 

Siamese Fireback Pheasants 2 
Peacock Pheasants ....... 3 

Mongolian Pheasants .... 4 

Hungarian Partridges .... 2 

White Peafowl 2 

California Wild Doves 100 

White-winged Doves 8 

Other doves, including 

Crowned Pigeons 60 



reported hundreds. The figures in all 
of the btates are running higher than we 
thought they would. The number of 
new breeders owning farms who jomed 
the Conservation Society in July was 74. 
Many new members will start game 
breeding this year as the letters seeking 
information indicate. 



223 



The largest number of game birds re- 
ported by an owner is a little over 900. 
A number of the clubs, no doubt, will 
beat this figure. We have been surprised 
at many of the returns. Some experi- 
menters whom we thought had only a 
few pairs of ducks and pheasants have 



Beg Pardon; Three Kinds. 

California Fish and Game says "there 
are two kinds of conservationists: the 
conservationists of the folded hands and 
the conservationists of the clenched fist," 
If a "folded-hander" can be consid- 
ered a conservationist at all (we do not 
so regard him) there certainly are to- 
day three species of conservationists. 
The "clenched-fisters" are usually loud 
shouters, who, like the fat girl in the 
side tent, undoubtedly often take in a 
good deal of money, but we have failed 
to observe where they have saved any 
game. It has vanished so rapidly that it 
seemed to us it might have been scared 
by the noise of the "clenched-fisters" out 
hollering for "stuff." 

The third class of conservationists, the 
game breeders, go quietly about their 
work of production and restoration. Al- 
ready they have produced hundreds of 
thousands of elk, deer and wild food 
birds and they are beginning to supply 
the dear people (who have been told 
that they own the game) with good big 
consignments for the table. 

The advice given by California Fish 
and Game that those who have the wel- 
fare of our resources at heart join some 
society is good. The list is not so good ; 
it gives the Humane Society and local 
Audubon associations as desirable socie- 
ties. The National Association of Audu- 
bon Societies should have been men- 
tioned first of all. It is of more im- 
portance than all the others put together. 
The Game Conservation Society and all 
of the game breeding associations in the 
country now are aware that the National 
Association of Audubon Associations 
favors their industry and there can be 
no doubt whatsoever that America soon 
will be the biggest game producing coun- 
try in the world. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



187 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 

The codfish lays a million eggs, 

While the helpful hen lays one; 
But the codfish does not cackle, 

To inform us what she's done ; 
And so we scorn the codfish coy, 

But the helpful hen we prize ; 
Which indicates to thoughtful minds 

It pays to advertise. 

— Credit Lost. 



The Butcher — I have some fine can- 
vasbacks to-day, ma'am. 

Mrs. Newlywed — Do you sell them by 
the yard? 

Puns as He Pays $140 Fine. 

"A dear deer," commented Elmer 
Dinge of Bulls Bridge to-day when fined 
$140 for shooting a deer.— The World. 



Teacher-^Now then, all together, once 
more: "Little drops of water" — and for 
goodness sake put a little more spirit 
into it ! — Melbourne Leader. 



Judge — Where have I seen your face 
before ? 

Prisoner — I am the dentist who pulled 
your tooth last week. 

Judge — Fifteen years ! — Credit Lost. 



"My boy has the whooping cough." 

"That must worry you." 

"Well, maybe it's all for the best. 
When he's whooping he can't ask ques- 
tions, and I get time to read up on the 
inquiries he has already made." — Wash- 
ington Star. 

.* 

A Prize Contest. 

What State has the most "fool game 
laws ?" The Game Breeder offers a fully 
paid up life membership in the Game 
Conservation Society and a year's sub- 
scription to the magazine to the first one 
who answers this question correctly. 
Three noted game law experts, each one 
of whom is said to know 5,000 more 
game laws than any lawyer now living, 
will be asked to judge this contest. 




This is the Hunter's Practice 
Month 



The game season will soon be here. 
Prepare for it now. Make sure of a full 
bag. Be ready to drop your bird when the 
fun starts. Get out your gun. Go out to 
the gun club and true up your aim. Get 
your arms— your eyes — and your mind — 
in alignment. Practice makes perfect and 

TRAPSHOOTING 

is perfect practice. Learn to hit the flying 
clays. Combine training, pleasure, recrea- 
tion and sport. If a gun club's not handy 
get a 

(STPDNt) Hand Trap 

— a simple, practical, portable device that 
throws all kinds of targets from easy 
gliders to " birds '.' that tax the skill of 
an expert. 

JOHN D. BURNHAM 

President of the American Game Protective and Propagation Assn. 
says: 

"The hand trap gives a shooter the kind 
of practice that he can get in no other way 
except on the birds themselves. I have 
seen some great improvement in field 
shooting in cover as a result of a moderate 
amount of hand trap practice." 

$4.00 at your dealer's. Sent direct 
postpaid, if he can't supply you. 

Write for Booklet 554S 

DuPont Powder Company 

WILMINGTON - DELAWARE 

Established 1802 



In writing to advortiaer spleaae mention The G«me Breeder oc sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



188 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

THE GAME BREEDER 



150 Nassau Street 



New 3fork City 



DOGS 



BEARHOUNDS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, BLOOD- 
HOUNDS. Fox, deer cat and lion hounds. Trained 
and young stock. 50-page illustrated catalogue. 5-cent 
stamp. ROOKWQi'D KENNELS. Lexington, Ky. 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS. IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
Engi'shi bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 

orler for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial purchaser to 
iurtge the quality, satisfaction guaraneed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALES — THE GREAT ALL 'ROUND DOG. 

Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent ; 
have puppies, grown dogs and brood matrons Send for 
large list. W. R. WATSON, Box 711, Oakland, Iowa. 

DOGS TRAINED AND BOARDED. BEST AR- 

ranged kennels in the South, located on 10.000 acres 
leased hunting grounds ; forced retrieving taught dogs of 
any age ; my methods never fail ; thirty years experience 
JESS M. WHAITE, Cyrene, Decatur Co., Ga 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS— THOR- 

oughbred Stock — Bred and raised on the James River 
and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost every day of the 
Duck Shooting Season. Dogs and puppies for sale Just 
right to break this Fall. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS from 
broken and thorough breed stock raised on the Chesa- 
peake Bay. Two dogs ana two bitches for sale. $25 00 
each 8 months old, broken to retrieve from land and 
water; just right to use this fall JOHN SLOAN, Lee 
Hall, Virginia. 

FOX, COON. SKUNK AND RABBIT HOUNDS 
broke to gun and neld and guaranteed. The kind that 
are bred and trained for hunting by experienced hunters. 
Fox, coon and rabbit hound i>uds from pedigreed stock, 
and extra tine ones, price 95 00 each. Stamp for photo. 
H. C. LYTLE. Fredericksburg. Ohio. 

MISC£I<LA.Ni:OUS 

RUFFED GROUSE WANTED, STATE PRICE. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WANTED-ACORNS. STATE PRICE PER BUSHEL 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS— RAISED AND REGIS- 

tered in old Wisconsin Eggs $1.25 per 12; birds $1.50 
each. Excellent decoys. Order now. E. G. SHOWERS, 
Onala-ka, Wisconsin. 

WHITE S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 



WANTED— COPIES OF THE GAME BREEDER FOR 
June, 1Q13: September, 1913; April, 1914 ; June, 1914;. 
December, 1914 We will pay 20 cents per copy for a 
few copies of the issues named in good condition, ihb- 
GAME BREEDER. 150 Nassau S treet. N. Y. 

WANTED— ACORNS. State price per bushel M TAN- 
EN BAUM, 149 Broadway, New York City. 



SPECKLED TROUT OIL PAINTINGS, 
"ARTIST MARTIN," Girard. Pa 



I 00 EACH. 



GUARANTEED GERMINABLE WILD RICE SEED. 
Shipment in September for fall sowing Shipped wet as 
recommended by the Department of Agriculture Supply 
limited. Order at once. ROBERT CAMPBELL. Keene, 
Ontario. 



LflVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 

Eggs for sale; several varieties. S V. KEEV£,s, 114 

E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 

GET WISE-RAISE PHEASANTS FOR PASTIME. 
Profitable and fascinating Send for prices. CON- 
NECTICUT FARMS PHEASANTRY, Union, Union, 
County. N. J. . 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement m this issue. 

WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 

antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now— the surest way to start 
breeding this species We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this csuntry. Black and White 
Swans.Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va^ 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J MACKENSEN. Yardley. Bucks 

County. Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family Pamphlet wiin order free. BLCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES.Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. <12ll 

CASH PAID FOR PEA FOWLS. State age and sex. 
Will buy SCO Ring Necks, 100 Amherst. 100 Goldens, 100 
Reeves. State your best price. HELEN BARlLEi 1 , 
Cassopolis, Michigan. 

PEACOCKS. ALL KINDS OF PHEASANTS, WHITE- 
African Guineas, for sale, pure blooded, non-relat^. I 
will buy Amherst, Reeves and Pea fowls. JOHN TAL- 
BOT, South Bend. Indiana. 9-i4-6m. 



FOR SALE — PEACOCK, each «6.00 ; MAMMOTH 
Flemish Rabbit $4.00 a pair at six months. Angora 
rabbit $S.OO a pair. Pigeons: silvered pouters $5 00 a 
pair, white fantails $2.00, white dragon $i 00. red homer 
$1.06. J. J. GAREAU, St. Roch I'Achig an. Quebec Can. 

PHEASANTS OF NINE VARIETIES; STOCK AND 
eggs. Ringneckscontractableby the thousand. DAISY 
FARM, San Lorenzo, California. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIhS 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc.. Kindly quote trice. A.J MERLE, Alameda. Calif . 



FOR SALE— ONE PET DEER, ONE YEAR OLD. 
Address ROY CLEWITT, Kerrlck, Minnesota. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breader or sign your letters: "Yours for Mote Game.* 



THE GAME BREEDER 



189 



PHEASANTS WANTED 
Two thousand English Ring Necked Pheasants. Kindly 
•quote price and particulars. "A", Roslyn, Long Island, 
N. Y. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS— DECOYS ; GOOD FLY- 

ing strain. 100 birds, $110.00; 12 birds, $15.00; (less, 
-$1.»7!4 each), no limit. Order now and from this adver- 
tisement. Send draft. Shipped Mondays. Eggs in sea- 
son. $10.00 hundred, March i to July 15. C. E. BREMAN 
CO., Danville, 111. 

WE HAVE A FINE LOT OF PINIONED PHEAS- 
ants for sale. Prices on application. THURSTON 
COUNTY GAME FARM, Olympia, Wash. H. W. 
Myers, Supt., R. F. D. No i 

PHEA>AN rS— Having pltnty of breeding stock. Golden. 
Silver and Kingneck Pheasants, I would take a position 
on a Private Estate or Club ta raise game, commercial 01 
otherwise. W. M., care ot The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York City. 

YOUNG GOLDEN PHEASANTS FOR SALE at 
reasonable prices. C. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wis. 



GA.M£ EGGS 

BOOK YOUR ORDER NOW FOR CHI.VESE RING- 

neck pheasant eggs, Oregon s famous game bird. $8 00 
per dozen, S'^O.OO per hundred. OREGON BIRD & 
PHEASANT FARM. Beaverton, Oregon. 

GOLDEN AND RtNG-NECK PHEASANT EGGS 
for sale, cheap. CONNECTICUT FARMS PHEAS- 
ANTRY, Union Union County, N. J. 

FOR SALE -PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
Golden and pure Lady Amherst. One pair year old 
hybrid birds for sale. E. R. ANDERSON, So. Hamilton, 
P. O., Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS IN JUNE, $4.80 PER HUNDRED. 
THOS. COWLEY GAME FARM, Mawdesley, Orms- 
kirk, England 



GAMKKCEPERS 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR SUPERINTENDENT- 
wanted by experienced man as above, 20 years' first-class 
character in England and America Understand raising 
of all kinds of Game and Ducks, training and management 
of Dogs, trapping of all kinds of Vermin. B, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St.. New York. 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs. Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 15c Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPEK— LIFE EXPERIENCED REARING 
land and water fowl, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs, conditioning lor shows A-l rearing pup- 
pies, well up in veterinary, competent manager of club or 
private estate. Distance immaterial J. H. W., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St.. N. Y City. 

GAMEKEEPER— WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January tst. Reason tor changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E JAMEb, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St.. 
New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoro ghly experieneed in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; a6 years' experieo e 
Can be highly recommended. R J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMKKEKPER REQUIRES SITUATION. UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F. care of The Game Breeder. 
150 Nassau Street New York. 



EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 
Private Estate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to 
T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 
York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly understands Pheasant and Wild Duck 
raising, (will rear Pheasants by contract). Incubators, 
management of deer, rearing and training of dogs, vermin 
trapping. Well recommended. Address W. s , care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

THREE GAMEKEEPERS WANTED 
At once. Head Gamekeeper, married, without family, 
thoroughly efficient in rearing game and wild fowl, and 
their management, to show sport. Good vermin trapper, 
dog breaker, and all the other various duties of a practical 
keeper. Also want two experienced Underkeepers, single. 
Send copy of references present and last employer. Apply 
stating age, etc., "A", Roslyn, Long Island, N. Y. 

SUPERINTENDENT.- Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 years, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3,000 pheasants have been penned and 
20 000 raised yearly. Understand the raising of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management ot incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit war rets W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St , N. Y. City. 



PIGEONS 

BEST HOMERS AND CARNEAUX PIGEONS TIME 
and money can produce. Pictures and description free. 
Write NATIONAL SQUAB FARM, Itasca, Texas. 



GAME BIR.D.S VTANTCD 

1 AM IN THE MARKET FOR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridjjes and masked Bob-whites. K. A., care of 
The Game Breeder. 150 Nassau Street, New York. 



"I always call a spade a spade," said 
the emphatic man. 

"That's right," replied Broncho Bob. 
"A fourflusher once lost his life in Crim-' 
son Gulch by callin' a spade a club." — 
Washington Star. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

Practical Book on Duck Breeding 
for Sport and Profit 

$1.50 

The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. 



M. G. and F. G. 1. 

Can you guess it? 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



190 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Game Birds 

I am now offering for immediate 
delivery my own hand-reared birds 

RING-NECK Pheasants. . . .$ 5.50 per pair 

Golden Pheasants 15.00 " " 

Canadian Geese 10.00 " " 

I also offer Pintails, Black Ducks, Teal, 
etc., and several varieties of Wild Geese. 

Safe Deliverg Guaranteed. 
John Heywood, Box b, Gardner, Mass. 



THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, who<e 
system is up to date and stands nneqnaled. 

Neti) Edition Just Oat. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird doe subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, 11.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Advertising 

to produce the best results, should 
begin in the Fall. 




4 



Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties/' 

Wood Ducks, Mandarins Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained EiJglish 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Egys, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 



Now Is The Time 



It is a ixiistake to delay ordering stock birds — 
prices will go up later and the birds will not lay well 
unless ordered early. We had a request for several 
thousand pheasants a few days ago and the demand 
for ducks is also good. 

Write to our advertisers NOW. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



191 



GiaiME 



tmokeless ShotgunPowder 



I 




of practically all 
mzikes you can get 
Infallible. Ask for it 
the next time you buy 
shells. 

If you are interested 
in trapshooting, write 
for our booklet called 
"Trapshooting." It 
is wort h re ad in g. 
Address : 

Hercu/es Powder Co. 

Wilmington. Del. 



TEJiCULES ^POWJmiiSO. 



Thei Propagation 
of Wild Birds 

By HERBERT K. JOB 



PRICE $2.00 



We pay delivery charges 



THE QAME BREEDER 

1 50 NASSAU STREET NEW YORK 







THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring Ducks hundreds of miles— my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year— also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh from their native haunts — 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I have the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. M.allards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write for My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 



NOW IS THE TIME 

If you expect to have fertile eggs next 
spring, buy your birds now ; don't wait until 
midwinter or next spring ; if so you will be 
disappointed. 

We Offer, Immediate Delivery. 

Silver, Golden, Blueneck, Lady Amherst, 
Reeves, Elliotts, Ringneck, Mongolian, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan Manchurian 
Eared and Melanotus Pheasants. White 
and Blue Peafowl. Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails. S. C. Buff and Blue Orpington 
and R. I. Reds. Mexican Wild Turkeys and 
Gray Mallard Ducks. 

^WANTED 

White, Black-shoulders and Jave Pea- 
fowls. In Pheasants any of the Tragopans, 
Firebacks and Cheer, Soemmering, Elliott 
White Crested Kalij, Anderson's Linnea- 
tus. Also Canvasback Ducks. In writing 
quote number, sex and lowest cash price. 

We will on receipt of 20 cents in stamps 
send colortype catalog of pheasants. 

CHILES & CO., ML Sterling, Ky. 



In writing to advertiser! please mention The Game Breeder or vtgn your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



192 THE GAME BREEDER 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

THE NEW YORK TIMES 

"The subject is the development of a new crop — a flesh crop which has especial 
timeliness in view of the general exhaustion of our food supply. Mr. Huntington dis- 
cusses in the most practical manner the restoration of this crop of feathered game, 
and from the standpoint both of the sportsman and the market gunner, wild ducks, 
it seems, can be raised as easily and cheaply as domesticated ducks, and with 
equally excellent financial results. The way to do this is described with estimates 
of cost and citation of experience abroad, where the deficiency of food supply has 
led to the discovery and elaboration of many remedies to which we have not yet 
been forced. Mr. Huntington's book is illustrated with photographs, interesting 
alike to naturalists and breeders." 

WILLIAM BREWSTER 

"'Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is obviously an able, comprehensive and very 
interesting treatise on a subject which has hitherto received but little attention from 
writers, especially m America, and concerning which naturalists, as well as sports- 
men, will, I am sure, be glad to be thus credibly and pleasingly informed." 

THE LOCKPORT UNION-SUN 

" Mr. Huntington has given to the American people an admirable treatise on the 
practical methods of making these splendid and desirable birds profitably plentiful. 
Ponds, streams and waste lands which do not pay the meagre taxes upon them can 
be utilized and be made to yield both handsome profits and good sport. This 
American authority on wild game tells the farmers and land owners of this country 
how to do it." 

CHARLES HALLOCK 

"The wild fowl book is valuable, clearsighted and scholastic. It is a, direct 
appeal to sportsmen of common sense and generous behavior, and they will readily 
absorb its comprehensive pages and act accordingly — and Hve thereby." 

DR. R. W. SHUFELDT 

" I have enjoyed the treat in my reading of this book from frontispiece to finis, 
and I wager anybody else will enjoy it. . . . The author has placed every sports- 
man, every naturalist and a great many other citizens of other callings squarely under 
obligations to him. The book is a direct and logical argument setting forth the 
means for the preservation in the future of our wild fowl and waders. . . . The 
illustrations are judiciously selected, interesting and materially add to the value of 
the volume.' 

A. A. HILL 

" This is not only a readable book, but it is important in an economic sense, and 
it will especially appeal to all who are interested in the conservation of wild life, and 
especially our game birds." 

AUTOMOBILE DEALER AND REPAIRER 

" If the advice of Dwight W. Huntmgton, pioneer and apostle of the movement 
in this country for a rational game protection and conservation, be acted upon, the 
time is coming speedily when game will be as cheap as beef or mutton. At present, 
after fifty years of legal protection, we have no game to amount to anything save in 
the more remote sections. . . . The book is not only instructive in an economic 
sense, showing how to make wild duck preserves safe and attractive, how to get 
stock and eggs and the food required, but is delightful reading for all. The author 
of ' Our Wild Fowl and Waders' is doing a great public service in his campaign 
for more game." 

Our Wild Fowl and Waders will be sent to any address in the United States 
or Canada with The Game Breeder for one year upon receipt of $2.00. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY 

150 NASSAU STREET, N. Y. 





Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
;^ c^v~ ^<=*^'^" Partridges and Pheasants. 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 800 best 
Royal Swans of England. 1 have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
i thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have flO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere— it will pay you to do bo. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 80 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE; a Tract of land suitable 
for a game park or preserve. 
Contains 2500 acres^ two lakes^ trout 
streams^ part cleared^ balance wood- 
lands Timber alone is worth the 
price asked for the land. 

This tract is well suited for a 
Game Breeding Association or Shoot- 
ing Club, It is located on the Dela- 
ware River^ not far from Port Jervis, 

There are a number of buildings 
suitable for Club purposes. 

We have other properties adapted 
for Game Breeding Associations and 
Shooting and Fishing Preserves, 

For Particulars address 

W, G, LYNCH 

The W. G. Lynch Realty Co* 

Long Acre Building - - New York 



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